9th President William Henry Harrison

9th President William Henry Harrison

Male 1773 - 1841  (68 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and 35 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name William Henry Harrison 
    Prefix 9th President 
    Born 9 Feb 1773  Berkeley, Charles City Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 4 Apr 1841  White House, Washington, DC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Harrison Tomb, North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I74237  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 

    Father Gov. Benjamin Harrison,   b. 5 Apr 1726, Berkeley, Charles City Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1791, City Point, Charles City, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Bassett,   b. 13 Dec 1730, Eltham, Charles City, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1792, Berkeley, Charles City Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 1748 
    Siblings 8 siblings 
    Family ID F30162  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Anna Tuthill Symmes,   b. 25 Jul 1775, Flatbrook, Sussex Co., New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Feb 1864, North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 22 Nov 1795  North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Elizabeth Bassett Harrison,   b. 29 Sep 1796, Fort Washington, (Now Cincinnati), Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1846  (Age 49 years)
     2. John Cleves Symmes Harrison,   b. 28 Oct 1798, Fort Washington, (Now Cincinnati), Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Oct 1830  (Age 32 years)
     3. Lucy Singleton Harrison,   b. 5 Sep 1800, Richmond, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Apr 1826, Cincinnati, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years)
     4. William Henry Harrison, Jr.,   b. 3 Sep 1802, Vincennes, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Feb 1838, North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)
     5. John Scott Harrison,   b. 4 Oct 1804, Vincennes, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 May 1878, Point Farm, Nr North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     6. Benjamin Harrison,   b. 5 May 1806, Vincennes, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jun 1840  (Age 34 years)
     7. Mary Symmes Harrison,   b. 28 Jan 1809, Vincennes, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Nov 1842  (Age 33 years)
     8. Carter Bassett Harrison,   b. 26 Oct 1811, Vincennes, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Aug 1839  (Age 27 years)
     9. Anna Tuthill Harrison,   b. 28 Oct 1813, North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jul 1865  (Age 51 years)
     10. James Findlay Harrison,   b. 15 May 1814, North Bend, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Apr 1819  (Age 4 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F30161  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    74237.gif
    74237.gif

  • Notes 
    • - US President No. 9

      Was elected in 1840 over his predecessor Martin Van Buren by a popular vote of 1,274,624 to 1,127,781 and an electoral vote of 234 to 60. Chose as vice- president John Tyler, who succeeded him after a single month in office. Was the oldest man to be elected president, the first to die in office, and served the shortest time as president.
      "Give him a barrel of hard cider and settle a pension of two thousand a year on him, and my word for it," a
      Democratic newspaper foolishly gibed, "he will sit ... by the side of a 'sea coal' fire, and study moral philosophy. " The Whigs, seizing on this political misstep, in 1840 presented their candidate William Henry Harrison as a simple frontier Indian fighter, living in a log cabin and drinking cider, in sharp contrast to an aristocratic champagne-sipping Van Buren. Harrison was in fact a scion of the Virginia planter aristocracy. He was born at Berkeley in 1773. He studied classics and history at Hampden-Sydney College, then began the study of medicine in Richmond. Suddenly, that same year, 1791, Harrison switched interests. He obtained a commission as ensign in the First Infantry of the
      Regular Army, and headed to the Northwest, where he spent much of his life. In the campaign against the Indians, Harrison served as aide-de-camp to General "Mad Anthony" Wayne at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, which opened most of the Ohio area to settlement. After resigning from the Army in 1798, he became Secretary of the Northwest Territory, was its first delegate to Congress, and helped obtain legislation dividing the Territory into the Northwest and Indiana Territories. In 1801 he became Governor of the Indiana Territory, serving 12 years. His prime task as governor was to obtain title to Indian lands so settlers could press forward into the wilderness. When the Indians retaliated, Harrison was responsible for defending the settlements. The threat against settlers became serious in 1809. An eloquent and energetic chieftain, Tecumseh, with his religious brother, the Prophet, began to strengthen an Indian confederation to prevent further encroachment. In 1811 Harrison received permission to attack the confederacy. While Tecumseh was away seeking more allies, Harrison led about a thousand men toward the Prophet's town. Suddenly, before dawn on November 7, the Indians attacked his camp on Tippecanoe River. After heavy fighting, Harrison repulsed them, but suffered 190 dead and wounded. The Battle of Tippecanoe, upon which Harrison's fame was to rest, disrupted Tecumseh's confederacy but failed to diminish Indian raids. By the spring of 1812, they were again terrorizing the frontier. In the War of 1812 Harrison won more military laurels when he was given the command of the Army in the Northwest with the rank of brigadier general. At the Battle of the Thames, north of Lake Erie, on October 5, 1813, he defeated the combined British and Indian forces, and killed Tecumseh. The Indians scattered, never again to offer serious resistance in what was then called the Northwest. Thereafter Harrison returned to civilian life; the Whigs, in need of a national hero, nominated him for President in 1840. He won by a majority of less than 150,000, but swept the Electoral College, 234 to 60. When he arrived in Washington in February 1841, Harrison let Daniel Webster edit his Inaugural Address, ornate with classical allusions. Webster obtained some deletions, boasting in a jolly fashion that he had killed "seventeen Roman proconsuls as dead as smelts, every one of them." Webster had reason to be pleased, for while Harrison was nationalistic in his outlook, he emphasized in his Inaugural that he would be obedient to the will of the people as expressed through Congress. But before he had been in office a month, he caught a cold that developed into pneumonia. On April 4, 1841, he died--the first President to die in office--and with him died the Whig program.


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