Roy Henry de France, IV

Roy Henry de France, IV

Male 1553 - 1610  (56 years)    Has more than 250 ancestors and more than 250 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Henry de France 
    Prefix Roy 
    Suffix IV 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 13 Dec 1553  Pau, Béarn, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 14 May 1610  Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried St. Denis Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I7234  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2002 

    Father Rey Antoine de Bourbon de Vendôme,   b. 1518,   d. 1562  (Age 44 years) 
    Mother Reine Jeanne d' Albret, III,   b. 1528,   d. 2 Jul 1572  (Age 44 years) 
    Married 1548 
    Siblings 5 siblings 
    Family ID F3042  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Marguerite de Valois,   b. 14 May 1553, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1615, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 18 Aug 1572  Notre-Dame, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F3256  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Maria di Medici,   b. 26 Apr 1573, Firenze, Toscana, Italia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jul 1642, Cologne Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 27 Dec 1600  Lyons Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Roy Louis de France, XIII, 'the Just',   b. 27 Sep 1601, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1643, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
     2. Elisabeth (Isabel) de Bourbon,   b. 22 Nov 1602, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Oct 1644, Madrid, España Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
     3. Christine Marie de Bourbon,   b. 10 Feb 1606, Le Louvre, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1663, Turino, Italia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     4. Nicolas de France,   b. 1607,   d. 1611  (Age 4 years)
     5. Duc Gaston Jean Baptiste de France,   b. 25 Apr 1608, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1660, Blois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
     6. Henriette Maria de Bourbon,   b. 25 Nov 1609,   d. 31 Aug 1669  (Age 59 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2846  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Gabrielle d' Estrées,   b. 1571,   d. 10 Apr 1599, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 28 years) 
    Children 
     1. Cesar de Bourbon,   b. 3 Jun 1594, Chateau de Coucy Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1665, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     2. Catherine Henriette de Bourbon,   b. 11 Sep 1596,   d. 20 Jun 1663  (Age 66 years)
     3. Alexandre de Bourbon,   b. 14 Apr 1598,   d. 8 Feb 1629  (Age 30 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F7131  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Marquise Catharine Henriette de Balzac d' Entragues,   b. 1579,   d. 1633  (Age 54 years) 
    Children 
     1. NN de France,   b. 1600,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Bishop Henri de Metz,   b. 1601,   d. 1682  (Age 81 years)
     3. Gabrielle Angélique de France,   b. 1603,   d. 1627  (Age 24 years)
     4. Marquise Gabrielle-Angelique de Bourbon,   b. 1603,   d. 1627  (Age 24 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F154336  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Jacqueline de Bueil,   d. 1651 
    Children 
     1. Comte Antoine de Bourbon,   b. 1607,   d. 1632  (Age 25 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F154337  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Charlotte de Essart,   d. 1651 
    Children 
     1. Jeanne Baptiste de Bourbon,   b. 1608,   d. 1671  (Age 63 years)
     2. Marie Henriette de Bourbon,   b. 1608,   d. 1629  (Age 21 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F154338  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 13 Dec 1553 - Pau, Béarn, Fr Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 14 May 1610 - Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    7234.jpg
    7234.jpg

  • Notes 
    • THE BOURBONS
      The Bourbon kings came from one line of the Capetian dynasty. They first acceded to the throne of France in 1589 through Henri IV, King of Navarre, who had a claim to the throne through his father, Antoine de Bourbon, an eighth-generation descendent of Robert, the son of St. Louis.
      The Bourbons reigned from 1589 to 1792 and again from 1814 to 1830, giving France seven of its kings. Louis XIII and Louis XIV set up a system of government based on absolute monarchy but this was swept away by the French Revolution in 1789 during which Louis XVI was overthrown and sent to the guillotine.
      Yet the dynasty survived through the brothers of the deceased monarch and, during the Restoration of the monarchy in 1814 (after the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods), Louis XVIII and Charles X reigned in their turns.
      After the 1830 Revolution and the abdication of Charles X, the crown passed to the Orleans line. The French Bourbon line died out in 1883 with the death of the Comte de Chambord, grandson of the last king, Charles X. However the Bourbon dynasty had many branches and has continued to exist in other countries e.g. Spain where its descendants still form the royal family.

      King of Navarre (1572-1610), King of France (1589-1610). Henri IV, the son of Antoine de Bourbon and Jeanne d'Albret, became the lea­der of the Calvinist party at the age of 16, after the death of Conde. When his mother died, he became King of Navarre (1572) and was married, that same year, to Marguerite de Valois, the sister of Charles IX, as a sign of reconciliation bet­ween Catholics and Protestants. Six days later, he escaped death and injury during the St. Bartolomew's Day massacre by tardily converting to the Roman Catholic faith. In 1576, Henri of Navarre fled the court, abjured Catholicism, and took over the leadership of the Protestant army. He then fought the Catholics for several years. When Henri II's last son died in 1584, leaving Henri III on the throne but childless, Henri of Navarre became Heir Presumptive and this led to another war. After Henri III's murder on the outskirts of Paris in 1589, Henri IV became King of France but his first aim was to conquer his kingdom, where some of the popu­lation had rejected him because of his Protestant religion. He fought the Leaguers and their ally, Philip II of Spain. Henri IV defeated Mayenne, the head of the League, in Argues in 1589 and again in Ivry in 1590 but was unable to take either Paris or Rouen. Realising that religion prevented his acceptance by the entire population of France, he eventually abjured Protestantism one last time in July 1593 and had himself anointed king in Chartres in February 1594. This enabled him to make an official entry into Paris (March 1594). He had, however, to fight the last Leaguers for some considerable time before obtaining their submission. He also fought Philip II of Spain. Henry IV was victorious in Fontaine-Frangaise (1595) but fighting continued in the north of France until 1598. The two monarchs then signed the Treaty of Vervins which confirmed the conditions laid down in Cateau-Cambresis and restored peace between Spain and France. In the same year, Henri IV brought religious peace to a country tired of fighting, through the Edict of Nantes (April) which gave Protestants freedom of conscience and freedom of worship. From 1598 onwards, royal authority was gradually restored, after being seriously called into question during 36 years of civil war. The king showed his authority by refraining from convening the States General, reducing claims from Parliaments and putting down, with great severity, any attempted revolt on the part of the nobility (Marechal de Biron was executed in 1602). In order to ensure Hat he had the loyalty of his public servants, he promulgated the Edict of La Paulette which required them to pay for what then became hereditary offices (1604). His work to redress the situation in France also affected the economic and financial sectors. Thanks to Sully, the situation rapidly improved through a policy aimed at limiting expenditure, encouraging agriculture, developing industries and introdu­cing a mercantile system that would enrich the country. Henri IV also worked to develop maritime trade and signed a treaty with England. Finally, he encouraged the colonial conquest of Canada where Champlain founded the town of Quebec (1608). As far as foreign policy was concerned, the second part of his reign was marked only by one short war against the Duke of Savoy (1600). France was vic­torious and acquired the Bresse, Bugey, Valromey and Gex areas. In 1610, Henri IV intended to launch a new war against the imperial army but he was assassina­ted by a fanatic, Ravaillac. In lS99, he had obtained the annulment of his marria­ge to Marguerite de Valois; he married Marie de Medici in the following year. This marriage produced Louis XIII and Gaston d'Orleans. The `'gay old spark" also had a number of mistresses including Gabrielle d'Estrees and Henriette d'Entragues, and a large number of illegitimate children whom he legitimised. Henri IV has remained the most popular of the French monarchs.
      **************************************************
      first Bourbon king of France, was the son of Antoine de Bourbon and Jeanne d'Albret. On her death he succeeded to the kingdom of Navarre (1572). He took leadership of the Huguenot (Protestant) party in 1569. His marriage
      in 1572 with Marguerite de Valois was the occasion for the massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day. Henri saved his life by abjuring Protestantism, but in 1576 he escaped from his virtual imprisonment at court and returned to Protestantism. When in 1584 Henri III named him heir presumptive, the Catholic League, headed by Henri 3rd Duc de Guise refused to recognize him and persuaded Henri III to send an army to force his conversion. In the resulting "War of the Three Henries," Henry de Navarre defeated Henri III at Coutras (1587) but came to the king's support in the troubles of 1588, and after Henri III's death (1589) defeated the League forces at Arques (1589) and Ivrey (1590); he was unable to enter Paris until 1594, after he had abjured Protestantism -- allegedly with the remark, "Paris is well worth a Mass." His war with Spain, the ally of the League, ended in 1598 with the Treaty of Vervins. In 1598 he also established religious toleration through the Edict of Nantes. With his minister Sully he spent the rest of his reign restoring order, industry, and trade. His slogan, "A chicken in every peasant's pot every Sunday," has remained famous. In 1600 he married Marie de' Medici, having had his earlier marriage annulled. His gallantry and wit, his concern for the common people, and his exploits with the ladies have become legendary.
      --Columbia-Viking desk encyclopedia, 1953
      ****************************************************
      Under Henry IV's reign, the Court was no longer to reach the matchless heights which the last of the Valois had wanted to give it. The king being too busy in reest­tablishing harmony between his subjects, forsook the luxury res­idences of the Val de Loire which no longer seemed to match tastes of that period. His son, Louis XIII, was still to come to Amboise or Chambord from time to time, but only to satisfy his liking for both hunting and solitude.
      In Blois, he was to exile his mother who succeeded in escaping, then he offered the estate to his brother Gaston so that he was no threat to his power. At the time of the Fronde, organised grand celebrations in Chambord. In the guard room, Moliere and his troupe staged " Monsieur de Pourceaugnac". Yet the young king, mortally offended by Fouquet's luxury - his financial secretary, castellan of Vaux le Vicomte, was soon only to be concerned with building Versailles in order to give proof of an absolute monarchy.


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