Elagabalus

Elagabalus

Male 204 - 222  (18 years)    Has 5 ancestors but no descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Elagabalus  
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 203-204  Rom Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Mar 222  Rom Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I668306  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 8 Nov 2009 

    Father Sextus Varius Marcellus,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Iulia Soaemias Bassiana,   b. 180,   d. 11 Mar 222  (Age 42 years) 
    Family ID F293961  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Julia Cornelia Paula,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2009 
    Family ID F294269  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Julia Aquilia Severa,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2009 
    Family ID F294268  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Annia Aurelia Faustina,   b. Abt 185,   d. Aft 222  (Age ~ 38 years) 
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2009 
    Family ID F293861  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Julia Aquilia Severa,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2009 
    Family ID F294270  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Hierocles,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2009 
    Family ID F294271  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Elagabalus
    Elagabalus

  • Notes 
    • von meuternden Soldaten ermordet und in den Tiber geworfen.
      Ks. 218

      In his early youth he served as a priest of the god El-Gabal at his hometown, Emesa . Upon becoming emperor he took the name Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus, and was called Elagabalus only a long time after his death.
      In 217, the emperor Caracalla was assasinated and replaced by his Praetorian prefect , Marcus Opellius Macrinus . Caracalla's maternal aunt, Julia Maesa , successfully instigated a revolt among the Third Legion to have her eldest grandson, Elagabalus, declared as emperor in his place. Macrinus was defeated on June 8, 218, at the Battle of Antioch , upon which Elagabalus, barely fourteen years old, ascended to the imperial power and began a reign that was marred by infamous controversies.
      During his rule, Elagabalus showed a disregard for Roman religious traditions and sexual taboos. He replaced Jupiter , head of the Roman pantheon , with a new god, Deus Sol Invictus , and forced leading members of Rome's government to participate in religious rites celebrating this deity, which he personally led. Elagabalus was married as many as five times, lavished favors on courtiers popularly assumed to have been his homosexual lovers, and was reported to have prostituted himself in the imperial palace. His reputed behaviour infuriated the Praetorian Guard, the Senate and the common people alike.
      Amidst growing opposition, Elagabalus, only 18 years old, was assassinated and replaced by his cousin Alexander Severus on March 11, 222, in a plot formed by his grandmother, Julia Maesa, and disgruntled members of the Praetorian Guard . Elagabalus developed a reputation among his contemporaries for extreme eccentricity, decadence, and zealotry which was likely exaggerated by his successors and political rivals. This likely propaganda was passed on and, as a result, he was one of the most reviled Roman emperors to early historians. For example, Edward Gibbon wrote that Elagabalus "abandoned himself to the grossest pleasures and ungoverned fury."


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