Emperor Charlemagne

Emperor Charlemagne

Male 742 - 814  (71 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Charlemagne  
    Prefix Emperor 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 4 Feb 742  Ingolheim Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Jan 814  Aachen, Nrh-Wf, D Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6511  Geneagraphie | Voorouders HW, Ahnen BvS
    Links To This person is also Charlemagne at Wikipedia 
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 

    Father King Pepin der Franken, III, "the Short",   b. 715, Jupille Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 768, St. Denis Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Mother Bertrada de Laon, 'au Grand Pied',   b. 720,   d. 12 Jul 783, Choisy-au-Bac Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years) 
    Married 740 
    Siblings 10 siblings 
    Family ID F2974  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Himiltrud,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Abt 768 
    Children 
     1. Pippin "the Hunchback" der Karolingen,   b. 769,   d. 811  (Age 42 years)
     2. Alpais,   b. 765,   d. Abt 852  (Age 87 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F2939  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Desiree Desiderata Langobarde,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 770 
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F2938  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Hildegarde von Vinzgau,   b. 758,   d. 30 Apr 783  (Age 25 years) 
    Married 30 Apr 771  Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen) Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Karl der Karolingen,   b. 772,   d. 4 Dec 811  (Age 39 years)
     2. King Pepin I Carloman of Italy,   b. Apr 773,   d. 8 Jul 810  (Age ~ 37 years)
     3. Adelheid der Karolingen,   b. 774,   d. Aug 774  (Age 0 years)
     4. Rotrude der Karolingen,   b. 775,   d. 8 Jun 810  (Age 35 years)
     5. Emperor Louis der Karolingen, I, "le Pieux",   b. 16 Apr 778, Chasseneuil, Vienna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jun 840, Ingelheim Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     6. Lothar der Karolingen,   b. 16 Apr 778,   d. Aug 780, Chasseneuil Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     7. Bertha der Karolingen,   b. 780,   d. 829  (Age 49 years)
     8. Gisele der Karolingen,   b. May 781,   d. 814  (Age ~ 32 years)
     9. Hildegard der Karolingen,   b. 782,   d. 9 Jun 783  (Age 1 years)
     10. Kunigunde,   b. Abt 772,   d. 15 Jun 835  (Age ~ 63 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F2937  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 NN 1,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Hruodhaid der Karolingen,   b. 784,   d. Aft 800  (Age 17 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F17309  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Fastrada de Franconia,   d. 10 Aug 794 
    Married Oct 783 
    Children 
     1. Theodrata der Karolingen,   b. 785,   d. 853  (Age 68 years)
     2. Hiltrud der Karolingen,   b. 787,   d. Aft 814  (Age 28 years)
     3. Graf Charles von Ingelheim,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F2936  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Liutgard von Alemania,   d. 800 
    Married 796 
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2935  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 7 Madelgard,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Rothilde der Karolingen,   b. Abt 784,   d. 24 Mar 852  (Age ~ 68 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F2941  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 8 Gerswinda von Sachsen,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Adalthrud der Karolingen,   b. Abt 790,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F2944  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 9 Regina,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Bishop Drogo de Metz,   b. 17 Jun 801,   d. 8 Dec 855, Metz Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     2. Hugo der Karolingen, "l' Abbe",   b. 794-802,   d. 7 Jun 844, Angoulême, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F2943  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 10 Adelinde,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Theodoric der Karolingen,   b. 807,   d. Aft 818  (Age 12 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F2942  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 11 Sigrada,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Rothaid der Karolingen,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2940  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 12 NN 2,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. NN der Karolingen,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F17310  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 13 NN 3,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. NN der Karolingen,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F17311  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 14 NN 4,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Aupais France der Karolingen,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Richbod der Karolingen,   b. 800,   d. 844  (Age 44 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F7552  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 30 Apr 771 - Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen) Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Jan 814 - Aachen, Nrh-Wf, D Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Charlemagne
    Charlemagne

    Maps
    Europe in 814
    Europe in 814

  • Notes 
    • THE CAROLINGIANS
      This dynasty of kings and emperors reigned over part of Western Europe from the middle of the 8th century to the 10th century. It gets its name from its most illustrious member, Charlemagne.
      The founder of the dynasty was Pepin the Short who put an end to the Merovingian dynasty in 751 A.D. by removing Childeric III from the throne and having himself proclaimed King of the Franks.
      His son, Charlemagne, continued to conquer territories and unified much of Western Europe before having himself crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 800 A.D. However, in 843 A.D, the empire was divided between Charlemagne's three grandsons and its western part produced the first French territory,Francia occidentalis. It was this country which was ruled by a succession of Carolingian kings from Charles the Bald to Louis V, over a period of 150 years.
      The 10th century saw the weakening of the Carolingian monarchy which was incapable of combating the division of the kingdom of France into principalities and unable to fight off foreign invasions. On several occasions, the kingdom's leading noblemen elected a king from the Robertian family (888 to 898 A.D. and 922 to 936 A.D). The death of King Louis V the Lazy in 987 A.D. marked the end of the French branch of the Carolingian dynasty.

      King of the Franks (768-­814), Holy Roman Emperor (800-814).
      Charlemagne, the elder son of Pepin the Short and Bertha, became King of the Franks upon the death of his father in 768 A.D. but had to share the kingdom with his brother Carloman. When he, in turn, died in 771 A.D, Charlemagne became sole monarch of the Franks at the head of a kingdom that he was to extend consi­derably, making him one of the most powerful sovereigns of his day. He was a sol­dier and conqueror, spending most of his life at war. In 773 A.D, he travelled to Italy at the behest of Pope Adrian I who was under threat from King Desiderius of Lombardy. The king was defeated and exiled and Charlemagne mounted the Lombard throne. This action renewed the alliance between the kingdom of the Franks and the papacy. In 778 A.D, Charlemagne led his first expedition into Spain but it failed (the campaign was marked by the death of Roland at Roncesvalles). Not until twenty years later did he succeed in crushing the regions to the north of the Ebro. In 781 A.D, in acknowledgement of certain regional particularities, he appointed his son Pepin King of Italy and his son Louis King of Aqutaine. Charlemagne waged war one last time in 788 A.D. against the rebel Duke Tassilo III of Bavaria, deposing him and annexing his territory. However, the longest and most difficult war of his reign was the struggle against the Saxons, a pagan Germanic tribe that was posing a threat to Austrasia. The conflict lasted from 722 to 803 A.D. It involved countless expeditions and Charlemagne was forced to have recourse to brutal methods in order to overcome them once and for all. An upri­sing led by Widukind broke out in 782, followed by a revolt in 793 A.D. These uprisings forced the Franks to wage war yet again. Eventually, Charlemagne had to implement large-scale deportations of Saxons, replacing them by Frankish sett­lers. In order to protect this border of his kingdom, he waged war against the Friesians and Avars. All around the Empire, he created "marches", quasi-military governments whose leaders, the `'margraves" were responsible for the defence of the territory. Through his conquests, Charlemagne became the master of an empi­re that covered much of Western Europe. No other sovereign had achieved such power since 476 A.D. In 800 A.D, Charlemagne travelled to Rome to set Leo Ill back on the papal throne after he had been removed by a revolt of noblemen. On 25th December that same year, Pope Leo Ill crowned him Emperor. This marked the restoration of an imperial title in Western Europe and gave Charlemagne even greater prestige. In domestic affairs, his reign was marked by an equally outstan­ding effort at administrative organisation. He divided the kingdom into counties (the `'counts" were then at the tip of the pyramidal feudal system), instituted regu­lar meetings with lay and ecclesiastical dignitaries, promulgated capitularies and sent 'missi dominici' out into the provinces to monitor the counts' administration. As regards currency, he confirmed the royal monopoly on the minting of coinage. The sovereign was surrounded by a large number of civil servants and advisers who constituted, with their monarch, central government. The Court followed Charlemagne everywhere he went and it was not until 807 A.D. that he decided on Aachen (Aix-la-Chapelle) as his capital. Finally, his reign was remarkable for its intellectual and artistic revival, with the opening of schools, the presence at Court of educated men such as Alcuin, Eginhard and Paul Diacre, and the construction of religious buildings. Charlemagne had four legally-recognised wives and at least six mistresses, and fathered eighteen children. In 806 A.D, again following the Frankish tradition, he provided for the division of his kingdom between his three sons but Pepin died in 810 A.D. and Charles in 811. On Charlemagne's death in 814 A.D, his grandson Bernard became King of Italy and his last surviving son, Louis, succeeded him at the head of the empire.

      Karel de Grote, werd Kerstmis 800 door paus Leo II tot keizer gekroond. Koning vanaf 768, keizer 800-814.
      Koning der Franken, Langobarden, keizer en beschermheer van Rome.


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