Roy Louis de France, XIII, 'the Just'

Roy Louis de France, XIII, 'the Just'

Male 1601 - 1643  (41 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Louis de France 
    Prefix Roy 
    Suffix XIII, 'the Just' 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 27 Sep 1601  Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 14 May 1643  Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6376  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2002 

    Father Roy Henry de France, IV,   b. 13 Dec 1553, Pau, Béarn, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1610, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Mother Maria di Medici,   b. 26 Apr 1573, Firenze, Toscana, Italia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jul 1642, Cologne Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 27 Dec 1600  Lyons Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 5 siblings 
    Family ID F2846  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Anne Maurice von Österreich,   b. 22 Sep 1601, Valladolid Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jan 1666, Le Louvre, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 24 Nov 1615  Bordeaux Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Roy Louis de France, XIV,   b. 5 Sep 1638, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Sep 1715, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     2. Duc Philippe d' Orléans, I,   b. 21 Sep 1640, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jun 1701, St Cloud Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2833  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    6376.jpg
    6376.jpg

  • Notes 
    • King of France (1610-1643).
      Louis, the elder son of Henri lV and Marie de Medici, succeeded his father in 1610 at the age of 9 and his mother acted as Regent. Although he was declared to have come of age in l 614, Louis XIII continued to be strongly influenced by her and by her favourite, Concini, until 1617. The policy implemented by the Regent was contested by the kingdom's leading aristocrats, among them Conde, and they fomented an uprising in 1614-1616. In 1617, Louis XIII showed his authority by having Concini murdered and removing his mother from power. From 1617 to 1621, he left government in the hands of his favourite, Luynes, and after warring against his mother in 1619-1620, the king was reconciled with her. The year 1624 marked the beginning of cooperation between Louis XIII and Richelieu; it was to last until 1642. Although the king was particularly carefully to maintain royal authority and although all decisions were made with his approval, he let the Cardinal govern the country. Richelieu had three major aims - within France, he wanted to ruin the Huguenot party and subject the seditious nobility to the power of the absolute monarchy once and for all; his foreign policy was designed to fight the House of Austria. In religious matters, Richelieu wanted to overturn the privi­leged political position granted to the Protestants by the Edict of Nantes. The Peace of Montpellier (1622), signed after initial rebellion on the part of the Protestants, placed restrictions on their military potential. The struggle started again in 1625. The most symbolic act was the siege and capture of La Rochelle in 1627-1628, since this was the place through which Protestants received assistance from foreign powers, in particular England. The struggle ended with the Treaty of Ales (1629) confirming the Protestants' right of worship but leading to the des­truction of their strongholds and fortresses. As far as the kingdom's leading nobi­lity was concerned, Richelieu repressed any attempt at revolt and punished any obvious failure to comply with royal edicts e.g. after the Chalais plot in 1626, the Montmorency rebellion in 1632 or the conspiracy instigated by Louis XIII's bro­ther, Gaston d'Orleans, in 1642. Richelieu's position came under attack on seve­ral occasions but the king never lost his trust in the Cardinal, as was evident in the Day of the Dupes (November 1630). His reign was marked by the institution of a strong, centralised, all-powedul State which intervened in every possible field (promulgation of the Michau Code in 1629, founding of the Academiefrangaise in 1635). In foreign policy areas, the Cardinal re-opened the hostilities against Austria, the country's traditional enemy since the reign of Francis I. Richelieu began by signing an alliance with England against Spain (1625) but domestic dif­ficulties and the threat from Protestants forced him to reverse the alliances in 1627. The problems inherent to the succession in the Duchyof Mantua led to French military intervention in the north of Italy in 1629-1630 and the occupation of Savoy. The Thirty Years' War provided Richelieu with an opportunity to take direct action against the imperial army. France entered the fray in 1635. Although the war began with a string of defeats (Corbie, 1636) and with anti-fiscality revolts in a France crushed by the burden of taxation, it later enabled France to occupy the Artois and Roussillon areas. The war was not quite over when Richelieu died, in 1642, and Louis XIII in 1643. Louis XIII's reign was also marked by the building of a colonial empire in Canada, Africa and the West Indies. He married Anne of Austria in 1615 and had a heir, the future Louis XIV who was born in 1638.

      succeeded his father, King Henri IV, as king 14 May 1610; he reigned until his death.


Home Page |  What's New |  Most Wanted |  Surnames |  Photos |  Histories |  Documents |  Cemeteries |  Places |  Dates |  Reports |  Sources