Roy Louis de France, XIV

Roy Louis de France, XIV

Male 1638 - 1715  (76 years)    Has more than 250 ancestors and more than 250 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Louis de France 
    Prefix Roy 
    Suffix XIV 
    Born 5 Sep 1638  Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1 Sep 1715  Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6345  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 8 Oct 2002 

    Father Roy Louis de France, XIII, 'the Just',   b. 27 Sep 1601, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1643, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Yvelines, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years) 
    Mother Anne Maurice von Österreich,   b. 22 Sep 1601, Valladolid Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jan 1666, Le Louvre, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 24 Nov 1615  Bordeaux Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 1 sibling 
    Family ID F2833  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Maria Theresia d' Espana,   b. 1638,   d. 1683  (Age 45 years) 
    Married 9 Jun 1660  St-Jean-de-Luz Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Dauphin Louis de France,   b. 1 Nov 1661, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Apr 1711, Chateau of Meudon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
     2. Anne Élisabeth de France,   b. 18 Nov 1662, Le Louvre, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1662, Le Louvre, Paris Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     3. Marie Anne de France,   b. 1664,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Marie Thérèse de France,   b. 1667,   d. 1672  (Age 5 years)
     5. Philippe de France,   b. 1668,   d. 1671  (Age 3 years)
     6. Louis François de France,   b. 1672,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2834  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Marquise Françoise Athenais de Rochechouart-Mortemart,   b. 26 Apr 1641, Tonnay, Charente, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1707, Bourbon-L'archambaud, Alliers, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Married 28 Jan 1663 
    Children 
     1. NN de France,   b. 1669
     2. NN de France,   b. 1669,   d. 1672  (Age 3 years)
     3. Louis Auguste de Bourbon du Maine,   b. 31 Mar 1670,   d. 14 May 1736  (Age 66 years)
     4. Duc Louis César de Maine,   b. 1672,   d. 1683  (Age 11 years)
     5. Louise Françoise de Bourbon de Nantes,   b. 1 Jun 1673, Tournai Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jun 1743, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     6. Louise Marie Anne de France,   b. 1674,   d. 1681  (Age 7 years)
     7. Francoise Marie de Blois,   b. 4 May 1677, Chateau de Maintenon Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1749, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     8. Louis Alexandre de Toulouse,   b. 1678,   d. 1737  (Age 59 years)
    Last Modified 5 Apr 2008 
    Family ID F2835  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Françoise d' Aubigné,   b. 27 Nov 1635, Niort Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1719, St.Cyr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 12 Jun 1684  Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 5 Apr 2008 
    Family ID F22128  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Duchesse Louise Francoise de la Baume le Blanc,   b. 1644,   d. 1710  (Age 66 years) 
    Children 
     1. Charles de France,   b. 1663
     2. Philippe de France,   b. 1665,   d. 1666  (Age 1 years)
     3. Louis de France,   b. 1665,   d. 1666  (Age 1 years)
     4. NN de France
     5. Marie-Anne de Bourbon,   b. 1666,   d. 1739  (Age 73 years)
     6. Comte Louis de Vermandois,   b. 1667,   d. 1683  (Age 16 years)
    Last Modified 5 Apr 2008 
    Family ID F21480  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Claude de Vin de Eillets,   d. 1687 
    Children 
     1. Louise de Maisonblanche,   b. Abt 1676,   d. 1718  (Age ~ 42 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F154340  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Duchess Marie Angélique de Scoraille de Roussille,   b. 1661,   d. Jun 1681  (Age 20 years) 
    Children 
     1. NN de France,   b. 1681,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2002 
    Family ID F154341  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 12 Jun 1684 - Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1 Sep 1715 - Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    6345.jpg
    6345.jpg

  • Notes 
    • King of France (1643-1715).
      Louis XIV, Louis XIII's son and his successor in l 643, was a mere 5 years old when he mounted the throne and his mother, Anne of Austria, became Regent until 1651. In fact, it was her right-hand man and adviser, Mazarin, who governed until his death in 1661. Mazarin's first aim was to continue the war against the imperial army that had begun during the reign of Louis XIII. The French army won the Battle of Rocroi (1643), conquered the left bank of the Rhine (1644) and was victorious in Nordlingen (1645). The Treaties of Westphalia signed in 1648 put an end to the war and France obtained a number of bases in Alsace. The conflict, however, had caused increasing economic and financial difficulties and Mazarin had been content to use expedients to bring money into the State's coffers. In 1648, his policies led to opposition; this was the beginning of the Fronde Revolt, the last brutal, disorganised manifestation of armed opposition to royal authority. Its failure resulted in the triumph of absolute monarchy. The Fronde was initially a rebellion on the part of the Parliamentarians in Paris, forcing the royal family to flee (January 1649) and Mazarin to negotiate (Peace of Saint-Germain). In 1650, however, it became a revolt on the part of the princes and a veritable civil war broke out. It was all the more serious because the Prince de Conde allied hirn­self with Spain which was still at war. Mazarin was forced into exile on two occa­sions, in 1651 and 1652, in order to pave the way for peace. However, the exces­ses of the princes and the terror instigated by Conde in Paris led to final victory for Mazarin and royal authority. The Cardinal returned to the capital in February 1653; this was the end of the Fronde. All that remained for Louis XIV and Mazarin to do was to end the war with Spain. It continued until l 659, marked by battles on the Spanish border and in the north of France, with successive victories and defeats. Eventually, the French victory at the Battle of the Dunes in 1658 led to the signa­ture of the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 under which France obtained the Roussillon, Cerdagne and Artois areas as well as numerous places in Flanders. It also provided for Louis XIV's marriage with Maria Theresa, Infanta of Spain; the wedding took place in 1660. Mazarin died in 1661, leaving the young king a coun­try at peace, healthy finances and stronger royal power. The political education that Louis XIV had received was to serve him in his efforts to instigate an absolu­te monarchy in France. His personal reign began in 1661 and lasted for an excep­tionally long time (54 years). During it, Louis XIV left his mark on France. He was aware of his royal prerogatives at a very early age and, when Mazarin died, Louis XIV announced that he would no longer be appointing a prime minister. He then removed the influential Fouquet from power. The king was aided by minis­ters in his search for grandeur, among them Colbert in charge of finances and the Navy, Le Tellier and Louvois at the Ministry of War and Lionne who dealt with foreign affairs, but all of them merely carried out the monarch's orders. The aris­tocracy lost all influence and power. It was excluded from political life, especial­ly after the court moved to Versailles (1682). The parliaments became no more than rubber stamps, the States General were never convened and administrative centralisation was strengthened through the use of intendants. Gradually, the cult of royal majesty developed. Louis became the "Sun King" in a system based on the theory of monarchy by divine right. Thanks to a major economic boom (within an authoritarian State-based regime), wealth for the country as a whole because of Colbert's ideas and the strongest army in Europe led by great generals such as Conde and Turenne, Louis XIV was able to impose his law on Europe. His aggres­sive foreign policy and territorial ambitions led to four wars during his reign for other European countries were worried by his attitude. The War of Devolution (1667-1668) against Spain led to the conquest of fortresses in Flanders, including Lille. The Dutch War (1672-1678), which was marked by the invasion of the Low Countries, produced an anti-French coalition but enabled the country to obtain Franche-Comte and Artois under the terms of the Treaty of Nijmegen and push back the northern and eastern borders. The policy of "reunions" implemented by Louis XIV during peace time, i.e. annexation of other territories including Strasburg (1681) led to a second coalition and the War of the League of Augsburg (1688-1697) in which France found it more difficult to stand up to its enemies. When the Peace of Rijswick was signed, Louis XIV was obliged to give back all the land he had obtained after 1679, with the exception of Strasburg. The question of the Spanish succession caused the last war since King Charles II, who had no heir, had designated as his successor the Duke of Anjou, Louis XIV's grandson. The War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714) was particularly difficult for France which suffered serious defeats. The northern part of France was invaded and the country seemed to be on the point of succumbing but the victory at the Battle of Denain (1712) gave it one final burst of energy and paved the way for the signature of a peace treaty which left Louis XIV with all his territories except for his lands in North America (Treaties of Utrecht and Rastadt). France emerged from these numerous wars impoverished and in ruins. As far as religion was concerned, Louis XIV behaved as the head of the Church of France, opposing the Pope's views in the royal prerogative concerning revenue from vacant sees and abbacies, persecuting the Jansenists and, more particularly, the Protestants. This latter poli­cy led to the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and the emigration of thousands of followers of the Reformed Religion. In cultural matters, Louis XIV was a patron of the arts and both letters and arts blossomed during his reign thanks to the pro­section afforded by the monarch to numerous people e.g. Moliere, Racine, Boileau or Lully, the creation of academies, and the numerous building projects launched (Versailles). He married Maria Theresa of Austria but soon tired of her. He had numerous mistresses including Mademoiselle de la Valliere and Madame de Montespan, and produced numerous children, all of whom were legitimised. After the queen's death in 1683, the king secretly remarried with Madame de Maintenon. By the end of his reign, he had lost all his children and grandchildren and he was succeeded on his death by his only living great-grandson, Louis XV, in 1715.


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