Roy Louis de France, XVI

Roy Louis de France, XVI

Male 1754 - 1793  (38 years)    Has more than 250 ancestors and 4 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Louis de France 
    Prefix Roy 
    Suffix XVI 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 23 Aug 1754  Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 21 Jan 1793  Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I5886  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2002 

    Father Dauphin Louis de France,   b. 4 Sep 1729, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1765, Fontainebleau Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Mother Marie Josephe Caroline von Sachsen,   b. 4 Nov 1731, Dresden, Sachsen, DE Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Mar 1767, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years) 
    Married 9 Feb 1747  Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 7 siblings 
    Family ID F2580  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Marie Antoinette von Österreich,   b. 2 Nov 1755, Vienna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Oct 1793, Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years) 
    Married 16 May 1770  Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Marie Therese Charlotte de France,   b. 19 Dec 1778, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Oct 1851, Frohsdorf Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     2. Dauphin Louis Joseph de France,   b. 22 Oct 1781, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jun 1789, Meudon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 7 years)
     3. Dauphin Louis Charles de France, XVII,   b. 27 Mar 1785, Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jun 1795, Temple Prison Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 10 years)
     4. Sophie de France,   b. 1786,   d. 1787  (Age 1 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F2582  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Aug 1754 - Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 May 1770 - Versailles, Yvelines, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 21 Jan 1793 - Paris, Île-de-France, Fr Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    The execution of Ludvig XVI
    The execution of Ludvig XVI
    The executioner Charles-Henri Sanson let the blade fall, and one of his executioner helpers did hold up the severed head.

  • Notes 
    • King of France (1774-1792).
      Louis XVI, the third son of the Dauphin, Louis, and his wife Marie-Josephe of Saxony and grandson of Louis XV, fell heir to the throne when his father died in 1765, since his two elder brothers had already died. Louis XVI married MarieAntoinette of Austria in 1770 and succeeded his grandfather in 1774. He inherited a difficult financial situation and a badly impaired image of the monarchy. Filled with the very best of intentions and a will to do his utmost for his people, he was a cultured, educated man who was open to the ideas of the Age of Enlightenment. Louis XVI, however, was not the man for the job. He lacked authority, had a weak, irresolute character and was easily influenced, sometimes with disastrous results. His indecision and contradictory behaviour were his undoing. From the beginning of his reign, he realised that there was a need for reform. He therefore recalled the parliaments and brought in reformist ministers to assist him. Turgot attempted to implement a major reform including the creation of a tax payable by all and free trade in cereals. However, faced with strong opposition from parliaments and court alike, and with the resultant increase in the price of cereals (known as the "flour war"), Louis XVI dismissed Turgot in 1776. Thereafter, no more reforms were possible. Neither Necker nor Calonne were able to change the course of history. Louis XVI's decision to involve France in the War of American Independence on the side of the Insurgents (1780-1783) led to a further worsening of the financial situation because of the use of loans. In 1787, Lomenie de Brienne submitted a new fiscal reform policy to the Parliament, but in vain. Eventually faced with the hostility of Parliamentarians (unrest in Rennes and Grenoble), Louis XVI gave in and convened the States General in 1788.

      Their meeting, at Versailles on 5th May 1789, was considered as the start of the French Revolution.

      The conflict regarding the voting procedure opposing the king and the Third Estate from the outset led to a breakdown of the system and the States General became a National Assembly in June 1789. The Assembly soon gave itself constituent powers. This was the monarchy's first defeat and the end of absolutism. Louis XVI's ambiguous attitu­de (dismissal of Necker, arrival of Coops in Paris) led to the popular uprising on 14th July and the fall of the Bastille then, in October 1789, to the days of unrest which resulted in the Parisian people bringing the royal family back to Paris. The Constituent Assembly gradually set up a constitutional monarchy and ended the old social order known as the Ancien Regime (abolition of privileges on 4th August 1789, acceptance of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen on 26th August 1789). Louis XVI appeared to accept these changes but, in fact, found it difficult to cope with the loss of his absolute power. The vote on the Civil Constitution for the clergy (July 1790) reinforced his mistrust of the new regime. Counting on the assistance of loyal foreign troops and emigrant aristocrats, the king decided to flee in June 1791. He was caught in Varennes, set back on the thro­ne by a moderate assembly careful to preserve the constitutional monarchy, but gradually lost his last supporters, even though he swore an oath of fidelity to the Constitution in September 1791. Once the Constitution became operational, it merely led to repeated conflicts between the legislative assembly and the monarch who held a right of veto. The outbreak of war against Austria (April 1792), which the king had ardently desired in the hope that a French defeat would give him back his power, discredited him once and for all.

      The defeats of the revolutionary armies and the sending of the threatening Brunswick Manifesto to the Parisian people revealing the king's secret negotiations with foreign sovereigns led to an uprising in Paris on 10th August 1792 and the end of the constitutional monarchy. Louis XVI was suspended from his functions, deposed and imprisoned in the Temple with his family.
      The National Convention, which met in September 1792, abolis­hed royalty, proclaimed a Republic, and decided to send the king to trial. He was found guilty of conspiracy and treason, sentenced to death and guillotined on 21 st January 1793. The monarchy ceased to exist but Louis XVI left a son, Louis XVII, who was imprisoned in the Temple and two brothers, the Counts of Provence and Artois, who had fled abroad.
    • (Medical):Under the Guillotine


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