35th President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

35th President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Male 1917 - 1963  (46 years)    Has 43 ancestors and 7 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name John Fitzgerald Kennedy 
    Prefix 35th President 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 29 May 1917  Brookline, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 22 Nov 1963  Dallas, TX Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 25 Nov 1963  Arlington National, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I52360  Geneagraphie
    Links To This person is also John F. Kennedy at Wikipedia 
    Last Modified 15 Mar 2013 

    Father Joseph Patrick Kennedy,   b. 6 Sep 1888, East Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Nov 1969, Hyannis Port, Barnstable, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Mother Rose Elizabeth FitzGerald,   b. 22 Jul 1890, North End, Boston, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1995, Hyannis Port, MA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 104 years) 
    Married 7 Oct 1914  Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 8 siblings 
    Family ID F21296  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Arlene Dahl 
    Married 1948 
    Last Modified 15 Mar 2013 
    Family ID F1301515  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Jacqueline Bouvier,   b. 28 Jul 1929, Southampton, Long Island, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 May 1994, Nyc, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 12 Sep 1953  Newport, RI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. NN Kennedy,   b. 1955,   d. 1955  (Age 0 years)
     2. Living
     3. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.,   b. 25 Nov 1960, Washington, DC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jul 1999, waters off Martha's Vineyard Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
     4. Patrick Bouvier Kennedy,   b. 7 Aug 1963, Otis Air Force B, Mass Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1963, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F21308  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Judith Katherine Inmoor,   b. 11 Jan 1934, New York City, NY, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1999, City of Hope Cancer Center, Duarte, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Last Modified 5 Jul 2002 
    Family ID F151408  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Living 
    Last Modified 26 May 2006 
    Family ID F145300  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Marilyn Monroe,   b. 1 Jun 1926, Los Angeles Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1962  (Age 36 years) 
    Married 1961 
    Last Modified 26 May 2006 
    Family ID F67408  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Living 
    Last Modified 26 May 2006 
    Family ID F177542  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    52360.BMP
    52360.BMP

    Sound
    Happy birthday Mr. President
    Happy birthday Mr. President
    Marily Monroe sings for John Kennedy

  • Notes 
    • By the age of 30, he had grown wealthy through many business ventures including real estate, stock market speculation and shipbuilding. In 1935 he attended Princeton University Illness forced him to leave but he resumed his education at Harvard the next year and graduated in 1940. In 1956 "Profiles in Courage" was published and he received the Pulitzer Prize for it in 1957. John F. Kennedy was the youngest president of the United States. Elected U.S. president in 1960, he was the first Roman Catholic to hold that office, winning it by a wafer-thin margin He assumed office in 1961. He worked hard to invigorate the country and get it out of recession. He had to deal with the Cuban missile crisis. He was assassinated on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas by Lee Harvey Oswald. Oswald was then shot by Jack Ruby as he was being transferred to another jail.

      On November 22, 1963, when he was hardly past his first thousand days in office, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was
      killed by an assassin's bullets as his motorcade wound through Dallas, Texas. Kennedy was the youngest man elected President; he was the youngest to die.
      He entered the Navy. In 1943, when his PT boat was rammed and sunk by a Japanese destroyer, Kennedy, despite grave injuries, led the survivors through perilous waters to safety. Back from the war, he became a Democratic Congressman from the Boston area, advancing in 1953 to the Senate. In 1955, while recuperating from a back operation, he wrote Profiles in Courage, which won the Pulitzer Prize in history.
      In 1956 Kennedy almost gained the Democratic nomination for Vice President, and four years later was a first-ballot nominee for President. Millions watched his television debates with the Republican candidate, Richard M. Nixon. Winning by a narrow margin in the popular vote, Kennedy became the first Roman Catholic President. His Inaugural Address offered the memorable injunction: "Ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for
      your country." As President, he set out to redeem his campaign pledge to get America moving again. His economic programs launched the country on its longest sustained expansion since World War II; before his death, he laid plans for a massive assault on persisting pockets of privation and poverty.
      Responding to ever more urgent demands, he took vigorous action in the cause of equal rights, calling for new civil rights legislation. His vision of America extended to the quality of the national culture and the central role of the arts in a vital society.
      He wished America to resume its old mission as the first nation dedicated to the revolution of human rights. With the Alliance for Progress and the Peace Corps, he brought American idealism to the aid of developing nations. But the hard reality of the Communist challenge remained.
      Shortly after his inauguration, Kennedy permitted a band of Cuban exiles, already armed and trained, to invade their homeland. The attempt to overthrow the regime of Fidel Castro was a failure. Soon thereafter, the Soviet Union renewed its campaign against West Berlin. Kennedy replied by reinforcing the Berlin garrison and increasing the Nation's military strength, including new efforts in outer space. Confronted by this reaction, Moscow, after the erection of the Berlin Wall, relaxed its pressure in central Europe.
      Instead, the Russians now sought to install nuclear missiles in Cuba. When this was discovered by air reconnaissance in October 1962, Kennedy imposed a quarantine on all offensive weapons bound for Cuba. While the world trembled on the brink of nuclear war, the Russians backed down and agreed to take the missiles away. The American response to the Cuban crisis evidently persuaded Moscow of the futility of nuclear blackmail.
      Kennedy now contended that both sides had a vital interest in stopping the spread of nuclear weapons and slowing the arms race--a contention which led to the test ban treaty of 1963. The months after the Cuban crisis showed significant progress toward his goal of "a world of law and free choice, banishing the world of war and coercion." His administration thus saw the beginning of new hope for both the equal rights of Americans and the peace of the world.
    • (Medical):He had to have spinal-disk surgery less than a year after his marriage. Four months later he had to have another operation.
    • JFK SCANDAL PAGE

  • Sources 
    1. [S607] Joseph P. Kennedy, A Life and Times, by David E. Koskoff., pg 132 (Reliability: 3).


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