Pope Ioannes, XI

Pope Ioannes, XI

Male 909 - 936  (27 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Ioannes  
    Prefix Pope 
    Suffix XI 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 909 
    Gender Male 
    Died 936 
    Person ID I434175  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 

    Father Pope Sergius, III,   b. 864,   d. 14 Apr 911, Rom Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Mother Princess Marozia di Spoleto,   b. Bef 924, Rom Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 932, Rom Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 9 years) 
    Family ID F200453  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Princess Alda (Hilda) de Vienne,   b. 911,   d. 967  (Age 56 years) 
    Children 
     1. Johannes d' Albon,   b. 935,   d. 987  (Age 52 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F239188  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Pope Ioannes, XI
    Pope Ioannes, XI

  • Notes 
    • Pope mrt 931-dec 935

      son of Marozia and Alberic I of Spoleto , Count of Tusculum . According to Liutprand of Cremona and the " Liber Pontificalis ", he was the natural son of Pope Sergius III (904-911), ("Johannes, natione Romanus ex patre Sergio papa", "Liber Pont." ed. Duchesne , II, 243).
      His mother was the Roman ruler at the time, resulting in his appointment to the Chair of Peter . Marozia was thus allegedly able to exert complete control over the Pope.
      At the overthrow of Marozia, John XI reportedly became subject to the control of Alberic II (932-954), his younger brother. The only control left to the Pope was the exercise of his purely spiritual duties. All other jurisdiction was exercised through Alberic II. This was not only the case in secular, but also in ecclesiastical affairs.
      It was at the insistence of Alberic II that the pallium was given to Theophylactus , Patriarch of Constantinople (935), and also to Artold , Archbishop of Reims (933). It was John XI who sat in the Chair of Peter during what some traditional Catholic sources consider its deepest humiliation, but it was also he who granted many privileges to the Congregation of Cluny , which was later on a powerful agent of Church reform.


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