Herakles

Herakles[1]

Male - Yes, date unknown    Has 54 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

Warning: Use of undefined constant husband - assumed 'husband' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /customers/7/0/c/geneagraphie.com/httpd.www/familyprevlib101.php on line 137
Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All

  • Name Herakles  
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Gender Male 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Person ID I423849  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 

    Father Zeus,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Alkmene,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F228720  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Megara,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292898  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Abderos,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292902  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Omphale,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Lamos,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Agelaos,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Tyrsenos,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292900  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Deianeira,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Hyllos,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F228767  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 5 Auge,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Telephos,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292829  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 6 Aeschreis,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Leukones,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292752  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 7 Anthea,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Eurypylus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292754  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 8 Anthippe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Menippides,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292755  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 9 Archedice,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Dynastes,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292758  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 10 Argele,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Nikodromus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292759  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 11 Asybia,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Alopius,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292760  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 12 Atrome,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Celeustanor,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292761  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 13 Chryseis,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Oreias,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292762  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 14 Eleuchea,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Euryops,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292763  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 15 Eone,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Mentor,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292764  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 16 Epilais,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Astyanax,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292765  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 17 Erasippe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Lykurgus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292766  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 18 Erato,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Asopides,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292767  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 19 Eurybia,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Polylaus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292770  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 20 Euryce,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Pylus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292771  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 21 Exole,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Kleolaus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292772  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 22 Halokrate,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Lynceus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292773  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 23 Helikones,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Olympuses,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292774  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 24 Hesychea,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Phalias,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292775  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 25 Hippodrome,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Teleutagoras,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292776  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 26 Hippokrate,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Hippozygus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292777  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 27 Klytippa,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Eurykapes,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292778  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 28 Krathe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Jobes,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292779  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 29 Lanomene,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Teles,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292780  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 30 Laothoe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Iphis,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292781  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 31 Leucippe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Euryteles,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292782  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 32 Lyse,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Eumedas,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Kreon,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292783  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 33 Lysidice,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Entredides,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292784  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 34 Marse,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Bukolous,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292785  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 35 Meline,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Laomedon,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292786  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 36 Metis,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Kales,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292787  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 37 Nice,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Olympus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292788  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 38 Nicippe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Patroklus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292789  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 39 Panope,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Thrisippas,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292790  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 40 Patro,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Archemachus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292791  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 41 Phyleis,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Tigasis,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292792  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 42 Praxithea,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Lysippus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292793  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 43 Prokris,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Antileon,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Hippeus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292794  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 44 Pyrippe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Nephus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292795  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 45 Stratonice,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Homolypus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292796  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 46 Terpsikrate,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Oestrebeles,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292797  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 47 Toxikrate,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Lycius,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292798  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 48 Typhise,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Amestrius,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292799  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 49 Xanthis,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Eurythras,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292800  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 50 Hebe,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292429  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 51 Aglaia,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Antiades,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292753  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 52 Euboea,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Hippotus,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292768  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 53 Eubote,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Eurypylos,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292769  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 54 Chalkiope,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. Thessalos,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Presbon,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Helle,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 19 Oct 2009 
    Family ID F292918  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Stärkster Held der griechischen Sage, wurde nach Vollendung seiner 12 Arbeiten, die ihm von Eurystheus aufgetragen worden waren, zum Gott erhoben, römischer Name: Hercules

      Der, der sich an Hera Ruhm erwarb", lateinisch Hercules) ist ein für seine Stärke berühmter altgriechischer Nationalheros , dem göttliche Ehren zukamen und der in den Olymp aufgenommen wurde. Er war Heil- und Orakelgott, Beschirmer der Gymnasia (Sportstätten) und Paläste. Er war ein Schützling der Athene .
      Seine Attribute sind das Fell des Nemëischen Löwen , Keule, Bogen und Köcher.
      Herakles war der Sohn des Zeus und der Alkmene , Zwillingsbruder des Iphikles , erster Gatte der Megara , zweiter Gatte der Omphale , Gatte der Deianeira , nach einigen Gatte der Auge und nach seinem Tode Gatte der Göttin Hebe ; außerdem Geliebter der Iole und des Abderos ; Vater zahlreicher Kinder, siehe Herakleiden . Herakles war Vetter und Freund des Oionos , Urgroßvater des Hippotes und des Deiphontes und Vorfahre des Polyphontes . Sein Ziehvater ist Amphitryon . Über die Genealogie seiner Mutter gehört er zum Geschlecht der Persiden .
      Zeus verliebte sich einst in die schöne Alkmene (und kam zu ihr in Gestalt ihres Ehemannes). Als ihr Gemahl Amphitryon zurückkehrte, fiel der Schwindel auf. Er verzieh seiner unwissenden Frau und zeugte mit ihr Iphikles , Herakles' Zwillingsbruder. Alkmene gebar also zwei Söhne - Herakles und Iphikles (letzterer als Sohn zweier Sterblicher ohne außergewöhnliche Kräfte). Weil Amphitryon seinen Onkel und Schwiegervater Elektryon erschlagen hatte, war er aus Mykene geflohen. So wurde Herakles in Theben geboren ( Homers Ilias . 19,97ff.).
      Hera , die Gemahlin des Zeus, wurde aus Eifersucht zur lebenslangen Verfolgerin des Herakles. Als die Geburt von Herakles und seinem Zwillings-Halbbruder Iphikles (Sohn des Amphitryon) bevorstand, verkündete Zeus, dass das erstgeborene Kind aus dem Hause des Perseus der Herr über Mykene werden solle. Darum hatte ihn Hera gebeten, um ihn zu überlisten. Sie verzögerte die Wehen von Alkmene und ließ zunächst Eurystheus , den Sohn des Sthenelus , eines Onkels Amphitryons, zur Welt kommen und erst dann Herakles, der somit diesem nun untertan war.
      Alkmene setzte den Säugling aus Angst vor Heras Rache aus. Seine Halbschwester Athene , die auch später als Schutzgöttin eine wichtige Rolle spielt, nahm ihn und brachte ihn zu Hera. Diese erkannte Herakles nicht und säugte ihn aus Mitleid. Dabei sog Herakles jedoch so stark, dass er Hera Schmerzen zufügte und diese ihn von sich stieß. Die Milch spritzte über den Himmel und bildete dort die Milchstraße . Doch mit der göttlichen Milch erhielt Herakles seine übernatürlichen Kräfte. Athene brachte das Kind zu seiner Mutter zurück. Herakles wuchs bei seinen Eltern auf. Er war gerade acht Monate alt, als Hera zwei riesige Schlangen in das Gemach der Kinder schickte. Iphikles weinte vor Angst, doch da ergriff sein Bruder die beiden Schlangen und erwürgte sie. Der Seher Teiresias , den der erstaunte Amphitryon kommen ließ, prophezeite dem Kind eine ungewöhnliche Zukunft. Zahlreiche Ungetüme werde er besiegen.

      Herakles wurde in den Künsten des Wagenlenkens , Bogenschießens , Fechtens , im Faustkampf und Ringen unterrichtet. Auch wurde ihm der Gesang und das Spielen auf der Leier beigebracht. Er war zwar sehr gelehrig, doch lebenslang bis zum Wahnsinn jähzornig . So erschlug er seinen Musiklehrer Linos mit der Leier, als dieser ihn zu Unrecht tadelte. Sein Pflegevater König Amphitryon schickte ihn daraufhin, wohl aus Furcht vor seiner ungebändigten Kraft, auf den Kithairon zu seinen Rinderherden. Hier wuchs er unter den Hirten zu einem Jüngling heran.
      In diese Zeit verlegt der Sophist Prodikos die sinnreiche Fabel von „Herakles am Scheideweg":
      Eines Tages kam der junge Herakles an eine Weggabel, wo dem einsam sinnenden Jüngling, zwei Frauen von hoher, aber sehr verschiedener Gestalt entgegentraten. An einem Weg stand eine Frau in kostbaren Gewändern, üppig geputzt, am anderen hingegen eine Frau in schlichter Kleidung, die bescheiden den Blick senkte. Zuerst sprach ihn die prächtige Frau (die Lust) an: „Wenn du meinem Weg folgst, Herakles, so wirst du ein Leben voller Genuss und Reichtum haben. Weder Not noch Leid werden dir hier begegnen, sondern nur die Glückseligkeit!" Dann die andere (die Tugend): „Die Liebe der Götter und deiner Mitmenschen lässt sich nicht ohne Mühsal erreichen. Auf dem Weg der Tugend (griechisch areté ) wird dir viel Leid widerfahren, doch dein Lohn wird Achtung, Verehrung und Liebe der Menschen sein. Nur du kannst entscheiden, welcher Weg der deinige sein soll." Herakles entschied sich, dem Pfad der Arete und Ehre zu folgen. (Daher die Redensart von Herakles am Scheideweg.)
      Aus jener Zeit des Hirtenlebens berichtet Apollodor noch folgendes Abenteuer:
      Auf dem Kithäron, an welchem die Herden des Amphitryon und des Thespios weideten, hauste ein Löwe, den Herakles zu bekämpfen unternahm. Thespios gab dem jungen Helden hierfür 50 Tage hindurch jede Nacht eine seiner 50 Töchter zur Umarmung, von denen darauf 50 Söhne geboren wurden. Nach langem Kampf erlegte sodann Herakles den Löwen und trug seitdem dessen Haut statt seines gewöhnlichen Gewandes, wozu später noch die einem Ölbaum bei Nemea entnommene Keule kam (daher sein römischer Beiname Claviger ).

      Bei seiner Rückkehr nach Theben begegnete Herakles den Gesandten des orchomenischen Königs Erginos , welche einen den Thebanern abgerungenen Tribut von 100 Ochsen holen wollten. Er schnitt ihnen Nasen und Ohren ab, schickte sie gefesselt nach Hause und zwang in dem darauf folgenden Krieg die Orchomenier, den empfangenen Tribut doppelt zurückzuerstatten. Schnell verbreitete sich der Ruhm seiner Taten. Kreon , der König von Theben, gab ihm zum Lohn seine Tochter Megara zur Frau, mit der er drei Söhne zeugte. Darauf rief Eurystheus ihn in seine Dienste, welchem er anfangs seine Dienstbarkeit verweigerte. Doch die rachsüchtige Hera schlug ihn mit Wahnsinn. Darin verfangen erschlug Herakles seine Frau Megara und seine mit ihr gezeugten drei Kinder.
      (Hiermit ist der Kult des phönikischen Sonnengottes, der mit Kinderopfern versöhnt wird, hinreichend bezeichnet.) In jenem Orakel soll er zuerst Herakles genannt worden sein, als der Held, welcher durch die Verfolgungen der Hera Ruhm erlange, während er bisher nach Amphitryons Vater Alkaios Alkaeos oder der Alkide geheißen hatte.
      Als der Anfall von ihm gewichen war und er seine schreckliche Tat vor Augen sah, ergriff ihn tiefe Bekümmernis. Schließlich fragte er das Orakel von Delphi um Rat. Da antwortete die Pythia : „Entsühnung für deine schreckliche Mordtat erlangst du nur, wenn du dich zwölf Jahre in den Dienst des Eurystheus stellst und die von ihm geforderten Taten erfüllst." Herakles tat, wie ihn das Orakel geheißen hatte. Bewaffnet mit einer Keule, die er selbst geschnitzt hatte, einem von Hermes geschenkten Schwert sowie Pfeil und Bogen, die er von Apollon erhalten hatte, ging er nach Argos zu König Eurystheus. Dieser gab ihm insgesamt zwölf Aufgaben, die Arbeiten des Herakles, die er allesamt bewältigte.

      Erlegung des Nemëischen Löwen Er schnürte ihm die Kehle zu, bis der Löwe erstickte. Dessen Fell trug er von nun an - es machte ihn nahezu unverwundbar.
      2. Tötung der neunköpfigen Hydra (Lernäischen Schlange) Er brannte jeden der enthaupteten Hälse aus, so dass keine neuen Köpfe mehr nachwachsen konnten. Den Rumpf der Hydra spaltete er in zwei Teile; in ihr Gift tauchte er seine Pfeile, die seitdem unheilbare, tödliche Wunden schlugen.
      3. Einfangen der Kerynitischen Hirschkuh . Er jagte sie ein ganzes Jahr lang, bis er sie endlich zur Strecke brachte - entweder mit einem Netz, das er über die schlafende Hindin warf, oder indem er ihre beiden Vorderläufe mit einem Pfeil durchschoss und sie somit fesselte.
      4. Einfangen des Erymanthischen Ebers . Er trieb ihn aus dem Wald in ein Schneefeld hinein. Der Eber ermüdete rasch. 5. Ausmisten der Rinderställe des Augias Da dies eine entehrende Arbeit war, musste Herakles hier einen besonderen Weg wählen, nämlich zwei nahegelegene Flüsse (Alpheios und Peneios) durch den Stall leiten.
      6. Ausrottung der Stymphalischen Vögel . Er bekam von Athene zwei große metallene Klappern. Mit deren Hilfe konnte er die Vögel aufscheuchen und einzeln mit seinen vergifteten Pfeilen töten.
      7. Einfangen des Kretischen Stiers . Herakles bändigte den Stier und brachte ihn zu Eurystheus, zeigte ihn ihm und ließ den Stier sogleich frei.
      8. Zähmung der menschenfressenden Rosse des Diomedes . Er warf ihnen zuerst Diomedes selbst zum Fraß vor. Nachdem sie ihren Gebieter aufgefressen hatten, konnte Herakles sie gezähmt in Richtung Meer führen.
      9. Herbeischaffung des Wehrgehänges der Amazonenkönigin Hippolyte Hippolyte übergab ihm den Gürtel freiwillig. Aufgrund einer Intrige durch Hera kam es schließlich doch zum Kampf, Herakles tötete Hippolyte und kehrte nach Griechenland zurück.
      10. Raub der Rinderherde des Riesen Geryon . Geryon forderte Herakles zum Kampf heraus. Herakles tötete ihn mit einem Giftpfeil. Hera, die zur Unterstützung des Geryon gekommen war, wurde von Herakles ebenfalls verwundet und in die Flucht geschlagen.
      11. Pflücken der goldenen der Hesperiden Dafür musste er bis zu den Säulen des Herakles auf Gibraltar . Durch eine List bewog er Atlas , den Vater der Hesperiden, ihm die Äpfel zu pflücken.
      12. Heraufbringen des Wachhundes der Unterwelt, Kerberos , an die Oberwelt. Hades erlaubt Herakles den Höllenhund zeitweise aus der Hölle zu entfernen. Herakles ringt ihn ohne Waffen nieder und bringt ihn zu Eurystheus
      bestimmt abgeschlossene Kreis derselben scheint nicht ohne Einfluss des Kultus des phönikischen Melkart , welcher die feindlichen Zeichen des Tierkreises zu überwinden hat, entstanden zu sein. Eine dichterische Verherrlichung haben diese Arbeiten, soweit wir sehen, zuerst durch Pisander von Kameiros (um 650 v. Chr.) erfahren. Die Zusammensetzung und Reihenfolge derselben wird verschieden angegeben.
      Ein andermal musste er als Buße für seinen Jähzorn der lydischen Königin Omphale drei Jahre als Sklave dienen. In diese Zeit der Knechtschaft verlegt Apollodor die Teilnahme des Herakles gemeinsam mit seinem Freund Hylas am Argonautenzug und an der Jagd des Kalydonischen Ebers sowie die Bestrafung des Syleus , Lytierses und der Kerkopen . Danach vollbrachte er zahlreiche weitere Taten.

      Herakles heiratete ein zweites Mal, die Königstochter Deïaneira . Mit ihr musste er einen Fluss überqueren, der Hochwasser führte. Der Zentaur Nessos erbot sich, die junge Frau trockenen Fußes auf seinem Rücken hinüberzutragen, galoppierte aber dann mit ihr davon. Herakles schoss ihm einen seiner tödlichen Pfeile nach und traf ihn. Als Nessos im Sterben lag, gab er, bevor Herakles herangekommen war, der Frau einen tückischen Rat: „Fange ein wenig von meinem Blut auf und bewahre es. Wenn du fürchtest, die Liebe des Herakles zu verlieren, tränke damit sein Gewand und er wird nie wieder eine andere Frau als dich ansehen." Sein Blut aber war durch den Todespfeil vergiftet.
      Jahre später schien sich Herakles einer erbeuteten Schönen ( Iole ) zuzuwenden. Da legte die eifersüchtige Deïanira ihm das von ihr blutgetränkte Untergewand hin (als „Nessoshemd" zur stehenden Redensart geworden). Gleich nach dem Anziehen befielen den Helden entsetzliche Schmerzen. Er versuchte, das Hemd abzulegen, aber es hatte sich fest mit seiner Haut verbunden und er riss zugleich sein Fleisch mit ab. Deïaneira tötete sich aus Verzweiflung. Um seinen unerträglichen Qualen ein Ende zu bereiten, schichtete Herakles auf dem Berg Öta, welcher für das Ende des Herakles durch das Orakel von Delphi einst verkündet worden war, sich einen Scheiterhaufen und ließ sich durch Philoktetes darauf lebend verbrennen. So traf die Prophezeiung ein, dass er durch jemanden sterben sollte, der selbst nicht mehr am Leben war. Doch wurde er aus den Flammen zum Olymp entrückt, wo ihm - als Einzigem unter den Sterblichen - die Unsterblichkeit verliehen wurde. Seine Qualen begütigten endlich Hera, und Herakles wurde mit ihrer Tochter Hebe , der Göttin der Jugend vermählt.

      Sein Kult verbreitete sich um das Mittelmeer. Die Römer verehrten Herakles unter dem lateinischen Namen Hercules (welcher aus dem etruskischen Hercle und dem griechischen Namen per Synkope entstanden ist), wie die Griechen als Gott. Dieser unterscheidet sich jedoch in einer Reihe von Mythen zu seinem annektierten Pendant. An seinem Tempel auf dem Forum Boarium gelobten ihm Geschäftsleute bei Antritt ihrer Reisen den Zehnten ihres Gewinnes.

      In der Kultur des europäischen Mittelalters galt Herakles als Vorbild für tugendhaftes Verhalten und für vorbildliches Kriegertum. Darstellungen der Heldentaten des Herakles und vor allem auch das Motiv des Herakles am Scheideweg finden sich daher während des gesamten Mittelalters und wurden auch während der Renaissance und des Barock in großer Zahl geschaffen.
      Berühmte Darstellungen gibt es von Leonardo da Vinci , Baccio Bandinelli und Peter Paul Rubens . Auch Schriftsteller und Dichter von Pindar , Ovid , Giovanni Boccaccio , über William Shakespeare bis Christoph Martin Wieland , Johann Wolfgang von Goethe und Friedrich Hölderlin bis zu Autoren des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts, wie Frank Wedekind , Robert Walser , Friedrich Dürrenmatt , Heiner Müller und Peter Huchel , wurden immer wieder von dem Mythos inspiriert.

  • Sources 
    1. [S5915] Stammbaum der griechischen Mythologie, Thomas Felkel, e9326571@stud4.tuwien.ac.at, (http://stud4.tuwien.ac.at/~e9326571/stammbaum/).


Home Page |  What's New |  Most Wanted |  Surnames |  Photos |  Histories |  Documents |  Cemeteries |  Places |  Dates |  Reports |  Sources