Anne Marbury, 60 Col.

Anne Marbury, 60 Col.[1, 2, 3, 4]

Female 1591 - 1643  (52 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Anne Marbury 
    Suffix 60 Col. 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 20 Jul 1591  Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 20 Jul 1591  Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 20 Aug 1643  Pelham Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 20 Aug 1643  Burial Mound, Hutchinson Farm, Near Westchester, (Present Newyork Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I34534  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 23 Dec 2007 

    Father Rev. Francis Marbury,   b. Jun 1555, Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 14 Feb 1611, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 55 years) 
    Mother Bridget Dryden,   b. Abt 1563, Canons, Ashby, Northampton, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1645, Berkhamsted, Hartford, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 82 years) 
    Married Abt 1587  Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 14 siblings 
    Family ID F14610  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family William Hutchinson,   b. Bef 14 May 1586, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1642, Portsmouth, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 55 years) 
    Married 9 Aug 1612  Chapel-Rectory, St. Martin Vintry, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Katherine Hutchinson,   b. Aft 1612,   d. 1654, Portsmouth, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 41 years)
     2. Edward Hutchinson,   c. 28 May 1613, Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Aug 1675, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 62 years)
     3. Richard Hutchinson,   b. 8 Dec 1615, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1670, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
    +4. Faith Hutchinson,   b. 14 Aug 1617, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1652, Newport, Newport Co, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)
     5. Bridget Hutchinson,   b. 15 Jan 1618, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1698, Saco, Maine, Or Boston, Mass. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     6. Francis Hutchinson,   b. 24 Dec 1620, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Hutchinson Farm, Pelham Bay, Nieuw Nederland, (Now Westchester Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years)
     7. Elizabeth Hutchinson,   b. 15 Feb 1621, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshireh, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. William Hutchinson,   b. 22 Jun 1623, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     9. Samuel Hutchinson,   b. 17 Dec 1624, Alford, Alford Parish, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Hutchinson Farm, Pelham Bay, Nieuw Nederland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)
     10. Anne Hutchinson,   b. 5 May 1626, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Pelham Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 17 years)
     11. Mary Hutchinson,   b. 22 Feb 1627, Alford, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Pelham Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 16 years)
     12. Mary Hutchinson,   c. 22 Feb 1628, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1643  (Age ~ 14 years)
     13. Katherine (Katherene) Hutchinson,   b. 7 Feb 1629, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 14 years)
     14. Katherina Mary Hutchinson,   c. 7 Feb 1630, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643  (Age ~ 13 years)
     15. William Hutchinson,   b. 28 Sep 1631, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1643, New Amsterdam Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 11 years)
     16. Susanna Hutchinson,   b. 15 Nov 1633, Alford, Lincoln, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1713  (Age 79 years)
     17. Zuriel (Zuryall) Hutchinson,   c. 13 Mar 1636, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     18. Zuriel Hutchinson,   b. 13 Mar 1636, Boston, Suffolk, MA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     19. NN Hutchinson,   b. Apr 1638, Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 23 Dec 2007 
    Family ID F14611  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • leader of the Antinomian Faction

      Anne Marbury Hutchinson came to be known as a religious troublemaker and, indeed, that was her heritage.
      At the time, her father was again in trouble over his quarrels with the Anglican leaders.
      They accused him of being a Puritan and, even though he won his trial, he was forbidden to preach again for several years. This was a benefit for Anne, for now her father could spend his time tending the fields near their home and teaching his young daughter. Anne learned to read through the Bible and an account of her father's first trial, which he had published.
      Anne was expected to help her mother care for her siblings. In addition to managing her household, Anne's mother spent much of her time helping others. She was a skilled midwife, and assisted the women of the community whenever they were giving birth. As she grew older, Anne accompanied her mother on these goodwill visits, and in time she herself became a midwife.

      Twenty-one was a late age for a woman of that time to still be single, but on August 9, 1612, Anne did marry. She knew William since her days in Alford.
      Establishing their home once more in Alford, the Hutchinsons lived there for twenty-two years and had thirteen children who lived to adulthood.

      Alford was far enough removed from London for religious differences to develop. Several women in the communities around Alford became preachers even though women preachers were not recognized by the Anglican Church. In Boston, only twenty-four miles away, a young and powerful minister, John Cotton, preached more and more often on Puritan themes. Anne Hutchinson had plenty of opportunity to hear about Cotton since Alford was a market town. Every Tuesday, people would come from far and near to shop at the market and to gossip. Cotton had read about John Calvin, a religious leader of Geneva, Switzerland, and had adopted his beliefs.
      One of these beliefs greatly influenced Hutchinson. Anglican bishops of the day were setting rules of conduct for people and judging them for their actions if they broke the rules. This was known as salvation through good deeds, or the Covenant of Works. Cotton, on the other hand, taught that people were sinners and they could only be saved by complete faith in God; their faith was more important than their actions. This belief became known as the Covenant of Grace. Depending on people to judge themselves, the Covenant of Grace placed responsibility for a person's actions directly on the person himself or herself, rather than tying the person's actions to the demands of the church. The Hutchinsons began to visit Boston to hear Cotton preach.

      A new king of England, Charles I, brought heavy taxes and a poor economy to the land. Meanwhile, freedom to worship continued to be an issue for many. In 1622 Cotton was arrested for preaching ideas not approved by the Anglican Church. He was able to avoid punishment but, as conditions grew more desperate, he began thinking of leaving England. Meanwhile, another preacher, John Wheelwright, who thought much like Cotton, married William Hutchinson's sister. Before long, he, too, was in trouble with the leaders of the Anglican Church. In 1633 Cotton sailed for New England aboard the Griffin. One year later, the Hutchinson family followed on the same ship. Their two older children had gone to the Massachusetts Bay Colony earlier. A couple years later, Wheelwright and his wife, Mary, joined the group in Boston.

      Before the Griffin even landed, Hutchinson was already in trouble for her beliefs. On board the ship bringing them to the new country was a preacher, Zechariah Symmes. Arrogant and given to five-hour sermons, Symmes sometimes preached doctrine with which Hutchinson disagreed. Hutchinson was outspoken about her disagreements and vowed to prove him wrong when they landed. However, Symmes was able to strike the first blow.
      Note: Rev John Lathrop also on board - he disagreed with Anne, but was more tolerant.

      Shortly after arriving in Boston, the Hutchinsons applied for membership in the First Church of Boston. (In those days, people were strongly examined about their beliefs before being allowed church membership.) Any member of the church could object to the application and require an investigation. William Hutchinson was immediately accepted into membership, but Symmes objected to Anne Hutchinson's application. She was forced to wait a week and then endure a hearing held by Governor Thomas Dudley, Cotton, and Symmes. It was to be only the first of several times Hutchinson would find it necessary to defend herself from her foes.
      Soon, as she had done back in England, Hutchinson began to hold weekly meetings to discuss the Sunday sermons of the ministers. At first these were intended for women, and only a handful of women attended. However, Hutchinson's gentle, helping nature (she continued to call on those in need and act as a midwife), and ability as a speaker soon attracted greater crowds. Once she had heard a preacher tell about his revelation that England was about to be destroyed. She was excited that others received revelations, for Hutchinson maintained that whenever she had done anything of worth, an inner spirit had revealed it to her beforehand. After a time men joined the women to hear Hutchinson speak; she addressed them from a large chair overlooking her audience. By 1637 Hutchinson would be holding two meetings each week in her home, "wherto sixty or eighty persons did usually resort"
      (Winthrop, p. 284).
      {Note: these meetings were held across the street from Winthrop's home and included Margaret, his beloved wife!}

      Massachusetts Bay Colony was established in an atmosphere of religious freedom, but it had changed to a rigid Puritan way. The ministers and high lay officials of the churches were becoming the law of the colony -- both setting rules and trying those accused of breaking them. Hutchinson thought that they were preaching the Covenant of Works and disagreed with them. Her weekly meetings grew increasingly outspoken in favor of changing the government so that people--and not their ruling ministers--would be responsible for their own actions and that they would be admitted to heaven through belief in God (the Covenant of Grace).

      The years 1635 and 1636 were important years for Hutchinson. In 1635 the ship Defence arrived in Boston with 200 new settlers. Among them was a young man of wealth and possibly influence at the British court, Henry Vane, and a new minister for the First Church of Boston, John Wilson. Vane was soon attending Hutchinson's meetings and agreeing with her ideas. Reverend Wilson, on the other hand, was a strong opponent. In 1635 he, John Winthrop, a fanatical Puritan and one of the founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and other leaders succeeded in expelling another free thinker from the colony, Roger Williams. Given six weeks to leave the colony, Williams went into the wilderness and established the community of Providence in present-day Rhode Island.
      Hutchinson had been telling her listeners that only two ministers, Wheelright and Cotton, besides her were teaching the right doctrine, a doctrine that meant that people could have freedom of religious belief. In 1636 her message grew stronger. She began to compare John Cotton and Wilson in a way that was unfavorable to Wilson. Her future grew brighter for a moment in the summer of 1636 when Vane was elected governor. But the colony had begun to take sides for and against Hutchinson. On her side were Vane, Cotton, and Wheelwright, as well as most of the people of Boston, who would have defended her right to speak.
      John Winthrop, the governor of the colony, had organized its founding in 1630. As he did so, he aimed to fulfill his dream of creating a "city on a hill," or a city in which people of one belief lived without religious prejudice. Differences of opinion among the people of the city disturbed him. One disturbance was removed when Roger Williams was banished. Now Winthrop turned his attention to Hutchinson. Joining him in opposition to her was Wilson and many of the ministers of churches outside Boston.
      During the winter of 1636 letters began to be sent among the leaders of both sides. At one time, Wilson and Winthrop persuaded Cotton to eavesdrop on Hutchinson's meetings to see if there were any unacceptable messages. Cotton reported none. Still, the letters were written and pressure grew to rid the colony of Hutchinson and her, according to Winthrop, "dangerous errors." The arguments grew more heated and focused on more and more trivial issues. The bickering grew too much for the twenty-four-year-old governor, Vane, who threatened to return to England but was persuaded to finish his year as governor. However, Vane was criticized by a second minister, Hugh Peter, who joined Wilson in his attacks. Wilson was forced to explain these accusations against the governor and was unable to do so, which made him more bitter toward Hutchinson.
      Still, the parties to the controversy gathered at Cotton's home and invited Hutchinson to join them. Hutchinson responded to their questions so satisfactorily that the meeting eventually broke up with everyone seemingly satisfied. Meanwhile, a foreshadowing of coming events occurred in March 1637. Hutchinson's brother-in-law, Wheelwright, was called to court to defend one of his earlier sermons. Led by Winthrop, the court found him guilty of sedition (or rebellion and contempt for disobeying the government). Most people of Boston, however, disagreed with this verdict, so the members of the court delayed sentencing until after the 1637 summer election of a new governor.
      The atmosphere in Boston was so heated that Winthrop successfully led an action moving the government across the Charles River to Cambridge. In the May elections, Hutchinson and her followers supported Vane, but their support meant little, for women were not allowed to vote. Winthrop was elected governor. Shortly thereafter Vane left for England and Wheelwright was banished from the colony. Finally, in November 1637, Hutchinson was brought to trial before a court headed by Winthrop. Winthrop had made himself the attorney general, foreman of the jury, and chief justice in this trial. According to John Winthrop, Anne Hutchinson "infected" other members of her family with her beliefs. Called before the governor in Boston, her son-in-law, a Mr. Collins, was charged with a letter he had written accusing the colony's churches and ministers of being anti-Christian. Collins and Hutchinson's son Francis were both thrown into prison.
      Although she had traveled five miles through the snow to reach the trial and was pregnant with her fifteenth child, Hutchinson ably responded to the challenge. "I am called here to answer before you, but I hear no things laid to my charge" (Adams, p. 236).
      As the trial progressed through the testimony of five ministers and her witnesses -- including Thomas Leverett and Cotton--Hutchinson appeared to have won the day. But in the end she delivered a tirade against those who accused her. It turned the tide of opinion and Hutchinson was banished from the colony. Due to her pregnancy she was allowed to remain under house arrest until the spring.
      Held in the home of the reverend Thomas Welde, Hutchinson awaited another hearing. This time a church council heard about twenty-nine gross errors she was accused of making. At this hearing she was harshly scolded for nearly nine hours, defended only by her son Edward and a friend, Edward Savage. Even her long- time friend Cotton turned on her, accusing her supporters of encouraging Hutchinson in her evil ways and telling the women present that Hutchinson had led them astray. The real reason for her trial may have come from the reverend Peter, when he accused Hutchinson of being a husband rather than a wife, a preacher rather than a hearer, and a magistrate rather than a subject. He was accusing Hutchinson of behaving more like a man rather than a woman of his day.
      At the end of the questioning, Cotton was requested to expel Hutchinson from the church. Cotton, however, persuaded Wilson to do so. It was a task that Wilson undertook with pleasure: "The Church consenting to it we will proceed to excommunicate. Forasmuch as you, Mrs. Hutchinson, have highly transgressed and offended ... and troubled the Church with your Errors ... I do cast you out ... and deliver you up to Satan.... I command you in the name of Christ Jesus and of this Church as a Leper to withdraw yourselfe out of the Congregation." (Ilgenfritz, p. 100)
      Hutchinson's actions had led to a movement for religious freedom that would continue in the coming years. In hindsight, she also served as an early champion of the rights of women.
      Seventy-five men of Boston had protested the final verdict. Immediately after his victory, Winthrop ordered these men to surrender their weapons or to acknowledge that they had sinned in their protest. All surrendered their weapons, but only thirty-five acknowledged that they had erred in supporting Hutchinson.
      Hutchinson's husband had traveled to what was to become Rhode Island in search of a new home. With the help of Roger Williams, he received permission from the Narragansett Indians to build a home on an island called Aquidneck. In the spring of 1638 Hutchinson gathered the children still living with her and moved to Aquidneck. There she continued to teach and preach, and the Hutchinson family flourished. In 1642 William Hutchinson died. By this time Massachusetts Bay Colony had grown so large that it threatened to take in other colonies as far distant as New York. New York, however, was in Dutch hands. Fearing that Aquidneck Island would soon fall to Massachusetts, Hutchinson gathered her young children and moved to Long Island, New York. There she established a home near present-day New Rochelle, New York, which was claimed by the Dutch.
      The director-general of the Dutch colony at that time was William Kieft. He had taken charge of a poor but spreading colony in 1637 and had shown very little ability to deal on friendly terms with the nearby Indians. Kieft demanded tribute of the Indians and made war on them at the slightest cause. His poor dealings resulted in a large Indian uprising in 1643 against the Dutch living on the outskirts of the colony. Anne Hutchinson and five of her children were killed in these Indian raids.
      One of Hutchinson's daughters was carried away by the Indian people who killed her mother and others in her family. The child was about eight years old when taken and remained with the tribe for four years. By then she had forgotten her own language and all her friends. Much to her dismay, she was returned to the Dutch when the parties finally made peace.

      Ilgenfritz, Elizabeth, "Anne Hutchinson", New York: Chelsea House, (1991).

      Williams, Selma R.; "Divine Rebel: The Life of Anne Marbury Hutchinson", New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, (1981).

      Winthrop, John, "Winthrop's Journal, History of New England: 1630-1649", edited by James Kendall Hosmer, New York: Barnes and Noble, (1959).

      2. A statue of Anne is on the state house lawn in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.
    • (Medical):by an Indian

  • Sources 
    1. [S517] Genealogien van de presidenten van Amerika, Onbekend.

    2. [S559] Mormon Genealogies: The Smith,Pratt,Young,Richards, and Allied Families, Stanford J. Robison, Chart 6 (Reliability: 2).

    3. [S559] Mormon Genealogies: The Smith,Pratt,Young,Richards, and Allied Families, Stanford J. Robison.

    4. [S404] Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt, Parley P. Pratt, (Deseret Book Co. Salt Lake City, UT. 1938), Pg. 465 (Reliability: 2).


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