Edward Montgomery  Clift

Edward Montgomery Clift

Male 1920 - 1966  (45 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors but no descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Edward Montgomery Clift 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 17 Oct 1920  Omaha, Nebraska Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 Jul 1966  California Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I323217  Geneagraphie
    Links To This person is also Montgomery Clift at Wikipedia 
    Last Modified 3 Apr 2002 

    Father William Brooks Clift,   b. Abt 1890,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Ethel Anderson Blair,   b. Abt 1895,   d. Aft 1966  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Siblings 2 siblings 
    Family ID F128818  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Living 
    Last Modified 7 Feb 2003 
    Family ID F147571  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    323217.jpg
    323217.jpg

  • Notes 
    • http://www.reelclassics.com/Actors/Clift/clift.htm

      Homosexual ???
      At thirteen Monty appeared on Broadway (Fly Away Home), remaining in New York theatre for over ten years before coming to Hollywood. By that time he was an accomplished actor, notable for the intensity with which he researched and entered into his roles.
      He was also by that time exclusively homosexual, though he maintained a number of close friendships with theatre women (heavily promoted by studio publicists). His film debut was Red River (1948) with John Wayne quickly followed by his early
      personal success The Search (1948) (Oscar nominations for this, A Place in the Sun (1951), From Here to Eternity (1953) and Judgment at Nuremberg (1961). By 1950 he was troubled with allergies and colitis (the army had rejected him in WWII for chronic diarrhea) and, along with pill problems he was alcoholic. He spent a great deal of time and money on psychiatry.
      In 1956 during filming of Raintree County (1957) he ran his car into a tree after leaving a party at Elizabeth Taylor's, it was she who saved him from choking by pulling out two teeth lodged in his throat. His smashed face was rebuilt, he reconciled with his estranged father, but he continued bedeviled by dependency on drugs and guilt over homosexuality. Monty managed to slowly develop a more sensible lifestyle back in his New York brownstone, and he was set to play in Taylor's Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967), when his companion Lorenzo James found him lying on top of his bed, dead from what the autopsy called "occlusive coronary artery disease"


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