Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle

Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle

Male 1756 - 1834  (78 years)    Has 2 ancestors and 39 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 1756  Amsterdam, NH, NL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Jul 1834  Bledsoe County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I314724  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2001 

    Father Pieter Philipes Hoodenpijl,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Mother Willemina Frank van der Velden,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F125948  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Jane Roncenville,   b. 1767, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 1845, Bledsoe County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 1786  Buncomb County, NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Jane Hoodenpyle,   b. 12 Apr 1812, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1891, Bledsoe County, TN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    +2. Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle, Jr.,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +3. David M. Hoodenpyle,   b. 1801, Buncombe County, North Carolina. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1875  (Age 74 years)
     4. Sarah Hoodenpyle, Sallie,   b. 1787, Buncombe County, North Carolina. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1869  (Age 82 years)
     5. Peter Hoodenpyle,   b. 1789, Buncombe County, North Carolina. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Dec 1870, Burke County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2001 
    Family ID F125817  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Helena Key,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 11 Jun 1780 
    Children 
     1. Pieter Philipus Hoodenpyle,   b. 1781, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2001 
    Family ID F125818  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1756 - Amsterdam, NH, NL Link to Google Earth
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  • Notes 
    • hilip Gysberti Hoodenpyle came from Amsterdam, Holland to America in 1783 with his first wife and their son. This was after Washington's siege of Yorktown and Cornwallis's surrender on October 19, 1781, The War ended in 1783 and "...he (Phillip) resolved to cast his fortunes with the young Republic, the Revolutionary War having just closed and the independence of the infant colonies having been effected....".The young family with $75,000 in their pockets landed in Philadelphia to begin a new life in America. He became a merchant in that city, but his wife was dissatisfied with the frontier life. She was used to the culture and refinement of the old country and longed for the safety and security of those surroundings. The new world was not for her and she returned to Holland and divorced Philip. The son later returned to America to Holland, Michigan and his descendants have become bankers and financial people.
      Philip lost most of his fortune during the time of his divorce and which also was shortly after the time of the American Revolution. He sought a new venture and moved to what is now Buncomb County, North Carolina from Philadelphia prior to 1792. He met and married the second time to Jane Roncenville. They settled at Warm Springs, now Hot Springs, and purchased the resort and 400 acres.
      Philip grew up in the finest homes and was part of the wealthy families in Amsterdam, Holland. Philip was born and reared in the city of Amsterdam, Holland, and was a graduate of one of the leading universities of the same city. He was a member of a family of great respect, and a descendant of some royal family of the kingdom who had done distinguished service for the crown, both in the Army and Navy. "Gysberti Hoodenpyl, ancestor of Phillip, helped to build the original dykes in Holland and was knighted for this achievement." Evidences of these facts were known and perpetuated in the coat of arms or seal held by Philip at his death. One of the Characters represented on the seal was two single females of the family, who at some critical period of the nation singly and alone successfully held a fort during siege of the same, and for this patriotic success they were permitted, when marring, to retain the name of Hoodenpyl. One other device on the seal represented a brother in command of a fleet or ship, who had also performed meritorious acts on the sea. Philip treasured this seal as a memento of the illustrious family from which he descended, and always represented to his children and grandchildren that there was a large fortune at Amsterdam due his Naval brother from the crown for the distinguished service performed by him that his brother was supposed to have been lost on the seas and had died without issue, and the estate would be held for a period of years by the crown and then distributed to his brothers and sisters he would likely die before the time or limit expired, after which any of his children could, with the seal or coat of arms, recover his portion of this vast fortune. But in the eventful and destructive events of the Civil war this coat of arms was lost or destroyed. Searching and persistent efforts have failed to discover its existence.
      J. Hoodenpyle, the son of David and Sarah Hoodenpyle, was traveling Family tradition states that sometime after 1839 Andrew traveled West in Arkansas when he was waylaid by snipers and killed. He was carrying the family Coat of Arms at the time and his grandfather had told him it was the key to a family fortune in Holland that they could claim in time. With the loss of this arms, the family was never able to reclaim the inheritance of Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle. As a child, I heard this story told by my Aunt Creeda many times.
      Phillip was educated and received his degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Amsterdam. With this knowledge and background he began again in the frontier mountains of North Carolina. He migrated south to Burke Co. NC by April 1786,where he purchased his first acreage. Burke was created in 1777 from Rowan County and it later became Buncombe County. It was here fortune began to smile upon Phillip.
      When Phillip Hoodenpyl migrated to North Carolina from Philadelphia, the route was the Old Wagon Road to Salisbury, Rowan Co. This road extended southward from Philadelphia through the Shenandoah Valley into Rowan County and Salisbury on the Yadkin River. Here he met and married Jane Rouncevill (Rounsaval), in all probability the daughter of Josiah and Sarah Rounsaval. The Rounsaval are of Huguenot descent .Benjamin Rounsaval (Sr.) operated a ferry on the Yadkin River for many years. Phillip Hoodenpyl operated the same type business on the French Broad River.
      Jane was born about 1767 and she and Phillip had nine children: Sarah, Peter, Mary "Polly", Phillip Gysbeti (jr.),Dorcus A.,Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, David and Jane who married John Billingsley. A deed dated 20 April 1786 states "Phillip Hoodenpyle Entry of an hundred and fifty acres of land in Burke County adjoining land of George Settles Entry and up both sides of Toms Creek...". Phillip is listed with 2 males 16 years and upward, 3 white males under 16, and 5 white females on the 1790 Burke Co. NC Census. He, Jane, son Peter and daughter Sarah "Sallie" were born by this time. He also cared for orphans serving their apprenticeships. Having established an inn, tavern and ferry on the French Broad River at Warm Springs, he would have needed much help, so some of these account for the additional persons in his household.
      When Buncombe Co. was formed from Burke in 1791-92, Phillip was one of the first seven justices and served in that capacity until 1801.From Civil Action Papers file of Burke Co. at the North Carolina Archives comes the following account, "Ph. Hoodenpyl maketh oath that his reason for not attending in the first of this Court as a Juror for Buncombe County is that he the Depon't. was hindered by reason of the delay of a person he had sent over into the Territorys to execute some business for him the Depon't, who did not return until Monday 2nd day and that said person did bring tidings that depradation was commited by the Indians about four miles below Cole Robinsons and that two men came into the Settlement and made oath that they counted 400 Indians well equipt for war making on toward Little Pidgeon & French Broad and that the peoples in the Territorys sent the inhabitants on this side the Bald Woods to be on their guards that the Depon'ts family was uneasy at the Intelligence and that the Depon't stayed at home a few days for the ease of his familys mind in hopes your Honors would Excuse him for so doing in consideration of his attending last Sep't Court as a Juror and willing to cover the remaining part of this Court. " (Signed) Ph. Hoodenpyl (original signature). Sworn to in Open Court Sept. 11th 1793 _____ Clk.
      Early records show Philip as one of the first commissioners, or Justice of the Peace, of the new Buncombe County created April 16, 1792. .
      James & William Brittain & Philip Hoodenpyle were members of the House of Commons (Representatives) in 1796. Senators comprised the Legislature's other governing body. "There is a tradition that in 1796, he (Thomas Love) had been a candidate against Philip Hodenpile who represented Buncombe in the commons that year, but was defeated. For Hoodenpile could play the violin, and all of Love's wiles were powerless to keep the political Eurydices from following after this fiddling Orpheus. But Love bided his time, and when the campaign of 1797 began, he charged Hoodenpile with showing contempt for the common herd by playing the violin before them with his left hand; whereas, when he played before 'the quality,' as Love declared, Hoodenpile always performed with his right hand. This charge was repeated at all the voting places of the county, which bore such significant names as Upper and Lower Hog Thief, Hardscrabble, Pinch Stomach, etc. Hoodenpile, who of course, could play only with his left hand, protested and denied; but the virus of class-feeling had been aroused, and Hoodenpile went down in defeat, never to rise again, while Love remained in Buncombe." On December 17,1799 the North Carolina Journal of the House of Commons states that Philip was appointed as one the commissioners to design and erect a courthouse, prison and stock in a central location which is now Asheville,North Carolina.Sometime prior to the fall of 1809, Philip had built the Hoodenpyle or Hopewell Turnpike which leaves the eastern or northern side of the French Broad River just below Marshall, North Carolina (Madison County) and through the hills in the direction of Warm Springs. Commenting on the rustic conditions of the roads, the Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury wrote in his journal October 25, 1809, on coming into North Carolina from Knoxville "... We crossed the French Broad, and fed our horses at the gate of Mr. Hoodenpyle; He would accept no pay but prayer." Philip also operated a ferry at the river near Warm Springs.
      In December 1812, Bishop Asbury asks "Why should we climb over the desperate Spring and Paint mountains when there is sudh a fine new road? We came on Tuesday a straight course to Barrett's (Barnett's) dining in the woods on our way." This must have been the Hoodenpyle road from Warm Springs to Newport, Tenn., which he was under contract to keep in order from Hopewell Hill to the Tennessee line.Phillip is shown on the 1810 Buncombe Co. NC Census (p. 287). The last of his land appears to have been sold by1813.
      July Court 1812 "Ordered by Court that John Welsh have privileges of erecting a ferry across French Broad River below the Warm Springs at the same place PHILIP HOODENPYL formerly had and to land on the opposite side...."Philip and his family migrated to Knox County Tenessee in the French Broad River area and built an Inn. Here he began to lay out various highways which still bear his names. He moved to Huntsville Landing on the Tennessee river in "the territory of Mississippi" (Huntsville, Tn is a small comunity below Knoxville on the Tennessee River), where John Welch of Haywood, agreed to deliver to him on or before the first of May, 1813, 2,667 gallons of "good proof whiskey"; and on or before 14 of August, 1814, 1,500 gallons of the same gloom-dispelling elixir, for value received. No wonder Philip Hoodenpile could play the fiddle with his left hand! About 1817 he moved to Sequatchie Valley in Grassy Cove on the advice of a friend, John Billingsley, from North Carolina. His daughter Jane was later to become the second wife of his friend. Philip was not able to use his methods of farming which entailed the use of ditching for draining the soil as in his native Holland, so he settled in the valley on land on the Sequatchie River. He lived in a cabin which was very different from his fine home in Amsterdam. He petitioned the General Assembly to go into sheep raising on the Cumberland Plateau on 3000 acres . . . "He claims its no good except for sheep raising" Philip designed the plans for the little town that was to become Pikeville and the County seat of Bledsoe County. He was again prosperous in Bledsoe where he purchased land on Glade Creek in Sequatchie Valley. In 1817 he purchased 364 acres on Sequoyah Creek. (Deed Bk. B, p. 235) .In 1819, he purchased Lot 46 in the Town of Pikeville (Deed Bk. C, p. 305) . In 1820 there are entries for slaves. Many deeds from 1817 - 1832 are found in Deed Books for Bledsoe Co. or in Tennessee Land Grants. It's said he laid out the Town of Pikeville but there is no documented proof.
      He had an educated mind and wrote a treatise on Mathematics with an emphasis on surveying, This treatise, along with several other writings were donated to the Tennessee State Library & Archives. In a letter dated August 26, 1983 from John H. Thweatt, Senior Archivist, "After going through our acquisition records and minutes for the Tennessee Historical Society, we find that the commentary was officially received by the Society as noted in the minutes of September 13, 1881 from George W. Hoodenpyle, McMinnville, through Robert T. Quarles, Esq. - a number of manuscripts, written from 1823 - 1832, by his grandfather, Phillip Hoodenpyle, Senior, of Sequatchie Valley, when he was 76 to 85 years of age. The writings consist of a work on Trigonometry and several religious disquisitions, and one remarkable for their fine penmanship, as well as the substantial truths enunciated."
      "Phillip, having an educated and cultivated mind, was an omnivorous reader and as his life declined...determined to spend the remainder of his years in writing a commentary on the bible for each of his children, giving his views on what he termed the errors of the theologians in teaching and preaching. So intent did he become on this task he set for himself, that he devoted several years prior to his death, to it to the exclusion of everything else. Even the approach of the grim destroyer found him at work and the pen was taken from his trembling fingers a few hours before his death...." Phillip C. Hoodenpyle died in July 28,1834 and his wife, Jane, followed November 2, 1845. They are buried in one of the early graves of Pikeville.Philip Gysberti Hoodenpyle came from Amsterdam, Holland to America in 1783 with his first wife and their son. This was after Washington's siege of Yorktown and Cornwallis's surrender on October 19, 1781, The War ended in 1783 and "...he (Phillip) resolved to cast his fortunes with the young Republic, the Revolutionary War having just closed and the independence of the infant colonies having been effected....".The young family with $75,000 in their pockets landed in Philadelphia to begin a new life in America. He became a merchant in that city, but his wife was dissatisfied with the frontier life. She was used to the culture and refinement of the old country and longed for the safety and security of those surroundings. The new world was not for her and she returned to Holland and divorced Philip. The son later returned to America to Holland, Michigan and his descendants have become bankers and financial people.
      Philip lost most of his fortune during the time of his divorce and which also was shortly after the time of the American Revolution. He sought a new venture and moved to what is now Buncomb County, North Carolina from Philadelphia prior to 1792. He met and married the second time to Jane Roncenville. They settled at Warm Springs, now Hot Springs, and purchased the resort and 400 acres.
      Philip grew up in the finest homes and was part of the wealthy families in Amsterdam, Holland. Philip was born and reared in the city of Amsterdam, Holland, and was a graduate of one of the leading universities of the same city. He was a member of a family of great respect, and a descendant of some royal family of the kingdom who had done distinguished service for the crown, both in the Army and Navy. "Gysberti Hoodenpyl, ancestor of Phillip, helped to build the original dykes in Holland and was knighted for this achievement." Evidences of these facts were known and perpetuated in the coat of arms or seal held by Philip at his death. One of the Characters represented on the seal was two single females of the family, who at some critical period of the nation singly and alone successfully held a fort during siege of the same, and for this patriotic success they were permitted, when marring, to retain the name of Hoodenpyl. One other device on the seal represented a brother in command of a fleet or ship, who had also performed meritorious acts on the sea. Philip treasured this seal as a memento of the illustrious family from which he descended, and always represented to his children and grandchildren that there was a large fortune at Amsterdam due his Naval brother from the crown for the distinguished service performed by him that his brother was supposed to have been lost on the seas and had died without issue, and the estate would be held for a period of years by the crown and then distributed to his brothers and sisters he would likely die before the time or limit expired, after which any of his children could, with the seal or coat of arms, recover his portion of this vast fortune. But in the eventful and destructive events of the Civil war this coat of arms was lost or destroyed. Searching and persistent efforts have failed to discover its existence.
      J. Hoodenpyle, the son of David and Sarah Hoodenpyle, was traveling Family tradition states that sometime after 1839 Andrew traveled West in Arkansas when he was waylaid by snipers and killed. He was carrying the family Coat of Arms at the time and his grandfather had told him it was the key to a family fortune in Holland that they could claim in time. With the loss of this arms, the family was never able to reclaim the inheritance of Phillip Gysberti Hoodenpyle. As a child, I heard this story told by my Aunt Creeda many times.
      Phillip was educated and received his degree in Civil Engineering at the University of Amsterdam. With this knowledge and background he began again in the frontier mountains of North Carolina. He migrated south to Burke Co. NC by April 1786,where he purchased his first acreage. Burke was created in 1777 from Rowan County and it later became Buncombe County. It was here fortune began to smile upon Phillip.
      When Phillip Hoodenpyl migrated to North Carolina from Philadelphia, the route was the Old Wagon Road to Salisbury, Rowan Co. This road extended southward from Philadelphia through the Shenandoah Valley into Rowan County and Salisbury on the Yadkin River. Here he met and married Jane Rouncevill (Rounsaval), in all probability the daughter of Josiah and Sarah Rounsaval. The Rounsaval are of Huguenot descent .Benjamin Rounsaval (Sr.) operated a ferry on the Yadkin River for many years. Phillip Hoodenpyl operated the same type business on the French Broad River.
      Jane was born about 1767 and she and Phillip had nine children: Sarah, Peter, Mary "Polly", Phillip Gysbeti (jr.),Dorcus A.,Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, David and Jane who married John Billingsley. A deed dated 20 April 1786 states "Phillip Hoodenpyle Entry of an hundred and fifty acres of land in Burke County adjoining land of George Settles Entry and up both sides of Toms Creek...". Phillip is listed with 2 males 16 years and upward, 3 white males under 16, and 5 white females on the 1790 Burke Co. NC Census. He, Jane, son Peter and daughter Sarah "Sallie" were born by this time. He also cared for orphans serving their apprenticeships. Having established an inn, tavern and ferry on the French Broad River at Warm Springs, he would have needed much help, so some of these account for the additional persons in his household.
      When Buncombe Co. was formed from Burke in 1791-92, Phillip was one of the first seven justices and served in that capacity until 1801.From Civil Action Papers file of Burke Co. at the North Carolina Archives comes the following account, "Ph. Hoodenpyl maketh oath that his reason for not attending in the first of this Court as a Juror for Buncombe County is that he the Depon't. was hindered by reason of the delay of a person he had sent over into the Territorys to execute some business for him the Depon't, who did not return until Monday 2nd day and that said person did bring tidings that depradation was commited by the Indians about four miles below Cole Robinsons and that two men came into the Settlement and made oath that they counted 400 Indians well equipt for war making on toward Little Pidgeon & French Broad and that the peoples in the Territorys sent the inhabitants on this side the Bald Woods to be on their guards that the Depon'ts family was uneasy at the Intelligence and that the Depon't stayed at home a few days for the ease of his familys mind in hopes your Honors would Excuse him for so doing in consideration of his attending last Sep't Court as a Juror and willing to cover the remaining part of this Court. " (Signed) Ph. Hoodenpyl (original signature). Sworn to in Open Court Sept. 11th 1793 _____ Clk.
      Early records show Philip as one of the first commissioners, or Justice of the Peace, of the new Buncombe County created April 16, 1792. .
      James & William Brittain & Philip Hoodenpyle were members of the House of Commons (Representatives) in 1796. Senators comprised the Legislature's other governing body. "There is a tradition that in 1796, he (Thomas Love) had been a candidate against Philip Hodenpile who represented Buncombe in the commons that year, but was defeated. For Hoodenpile could play the violin, and all of Love's wiles were powerless to keep the political Eurydices from following after this fiddling Orpheus. But Love bided his time, and when the campaign of 1797 began, he charged Hoodenpile with showing contempt for the common herd by playing the violin before them with his left hand; whereas, when he played before 'the quality,' as Love declared, Hoodenpile always performed with his right hand. This charge was repeated at all the voting places of the county, which bore such significant names as Upper and Lower Hog Thief, Hardscrabble, Pinch Stomach, etc. Hoodenpile, who of course, could play only with his left hand, protested and denied; but the virus of class-feeling had been aroused, and Hoodenpile went down in defeat, never to rise again, while Love remained in Buncombe."
      On December 17,1799 the North Carolina Journal of the House of Commons states that Philip was appointed as one the commissioners to design and erect a courthouse, prison and stock in a central location which is now Asheville,North Carolina.Sometime prior to the fall of 1809, Philip had built the Hoodenpyle or Hopewell Turnpike which leaves the eastern or northern side of the French Broad River just below Marshall, North Carolina (Madison County) and through the hills in the direction of Warm Springs. Commenting on the rustic conditions of the roads, the Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury wrote in his journal October 25, 1809, on coming into North Carolina from Knoxville "... We crossed the French Broad, and fed our horses at the gate of Mr. Hoodenpyle; He would accept no pay but prayer." Philip also operated a ferry at the river near Warm Springs.
      In December 1812, Bishop Asbury asks "Why should we climb over the desperate Spring and Paint mountains when there is sudh a fine new road? We came on Tuesday a straight course to Barrett's (Barnett's) dining in the woods on our way." This must have been the Hoodenpyle road from Warm Springs to Newport, Tenn., which he was under contract to keep in order from Hopewell Hill to the Tennessee line.Phillip is shown on the 1810 Buncombe Co. NC Census (p. 287). The last of his land appears to have been sold by1813.
      July Court 1812 "Ordered by Court that John Welsh have privileges of erecting a ferry across French Broad River below the Warm Springs at the same place PHILIP HOODENPYL formerly had and to land on the opposite side...."Philip and his family migrated to Knox County Tenessee in the French Broad River area and built an Inn. Here he began to lay out various highways which still bear his names. He moved to Huntsville Landing on the Tennessee river in "the territory of Mississippi" (Huntsville, Tn is a small comunity below Knoxville on the Tennessee River), where John Welch of Haywood, agreed to deliver to him on or before the first of May, 1813, 2,667 gallons of "good proof whiskey"; and on or before 14 of August, 1814, 1,500 gallons of the same gloom-dispelling elixir, for value received. No wonder Philip Hoodenpile could play the fiddle with his left hand!
      About 1817 he moved to Sequatchie Valley in Grassy Cove on the advice of a friend, John Billingsley, from North Carolina. His daughter Jane was later to become the second wife of his friend. Philip was not able to use his methods of farming which entailed the use of ditching for draining the soil as in his native Holland, so he settled in the valley on land on the Sequatchie River. He lived in a cabin which was very different from his fine home in Amsterdam. He petitioned the General Assembly to go into sheep raising on the Cumberland Plateau on 3000 acres . . . "He claims its no good except for sheep raising" Philip designed the plans for the little town that was to become Pikeville and the County seat of Bledsoe County. He was again prosperous in Bledsoe where he purchased land on Glade Creek in Sequatchie Valley. In 1817 he purchased 364 acres on Sequoyah Creek. (Deed Bk. B, p. 235) .In 1819, he purchased Lot 46 in the Town of Pikeville (Deed Bk. C, p. 305) . In 1820 there are entries for slaves. Many deeds from 1817 - 1832 are found in Deed Books for Bledsoe Co. or in Tennessee Land Grants. It's said he laid out the Town of Pikeville but there is no documented proof.
      He had an educated mind and wrote a treatise on Mathematics with an emphasis on surveying, This treatise, along with several other writings were donated to the Tennessee State Library & Archives. In a letter dated August 26, 1983 from John H. Thweatt, Senior Archivist, "After going through our acquisition records and minutes for the Tennessee Historical Society, we find that the commentary was officially received by the Society as noted in the minutes of September 13, 1881 from George W. Hoodenpyle, McMinnville, through Robert T. Quarles, Esq. - a number of manuscripts, written from 1823 - 1832, by his grandfather, Phillip Hoodenpyle, Senior, of Sequatchie Valley, when he was 76 to 85 years of age. The writings consist of a work on Trigonometry and several religious disquisitions, and one remarkable for their fine penmanship, as well as the substantial truths enunciated."
      "Phillip, having an educated and cultivated mind, was an omnivorous reader and as his life declined...determined to spend the remainder of his years in writing a commentary on the bible for each of his children, giving his views on what he termed the errors of the theologians in teaching and preaching. So intent did he become on this task he set for himself, that he devoted several years prior to his death, to it to the exclusion of everything else. Even the approach of the grim destroyer found him at work and the pen was taken from his trembling fingers a few hours before his death...." Phillip C. Hoodenpyle died in July 28,1834 and his wife, Jane, followed November 2, 1845. They are buried in one of the early graves of Pikeville.


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