Hubert  Garnett

Hubert Garnett

Male 1881 - 1977  (95 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and 2 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Hubert Garnett 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 28 Nov 1881  Delamere, Cheshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 17 Jul 1977  Lachute, Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I269596  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 13 Aug 2001 

    Father Richard Craven Garnett,   b. 18 Feb 1843, Nantwich, Cheshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1926, Southampton, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Mother Charlotte Isabel Leach,   b. 1849, Thornton-in-Lonsdale, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Apr 1893, Settle, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Married 20 Jul 1871 
    Siblings 10 siblings 
    Family ID F108982  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ethel Mairi Clayton,   b. 12 Sep 1882, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Mar 1961, Lachine, Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married Abt 1900 
    Children 
     1. Rosamond Garnett,   b. Abt 1901,   d. 18 Mar 1924, Dragon, Rigaud, Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 23 years)
     2. Geoffrey Garnett,   b. 27 Aug 1918, Montréal, QC, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Sep 1987, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
    Last Modified 13 Aug 2001 
    Family ID F108975  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 



    • Hubert GARNETT was the seventh child of the Reverend Richard Craven GARNETT [q.v. #8] and Charlotte Isabel LEACH [q.v. #9]. He was born at Northwich, Cheshire on November 28, 1881 during the period when his father was Rector of the Delamere parish church (1873-1889). The family lived then in a house at 37 Northwich Road, Delamere.

      The Reverend Garnett and his family moved to Settle, NorthYorkshire in 1889 when Hubert was eight years old, and it was there that Hubert went to school and where the family continued to reside until 1901 when Reverend Garnett accepted the post of Rector at Salwarpe, Worchester.

      Hubert grew up in a large family---nine of the eleven children of Richard and Charlotte Garnett survived to maturity. Several of Hubert's sisters (Marion, Kate, Isobel) are known to have been active in the church, but little is currently known about Hubert's childhood, education, or religious devotions.

      At some point in the early 1900s, Hubert met and married Ethel Mairi CLAYTON [q.v. #5], daughter of George Edward CLAYTON and Sarah Jane VEEVERS. The date, place and circumstances of this marriage are as yet unknown, but their meeting and marriage perhaps occurred in Settle since both families lived in that area.

      In about 1910 or 1912, they emigrated to Canada and resided close to Montreal. It is thought that Hubert was employed for a time on the construction of the Blue Bonnets racetrack in Montreal.

      When the Great War broke out in 1914, the Northern Explosives munitions plant at Dragon, Quebec (which had been founded in 1907 by Colonel James Riley and his brother Major George Riley) was taken over by the English munitions firm of Curtiss and Harvey.

      Hubert Garnett's great great grandfather, Richard CRAVEN and his brothers are believed to have been partners in the original formation of the Curtiss and Harvey gunpowder company. It is perhaps through this connection that Hubert came to work for the company plant at Dragon.

      Hubert was working as a security guard in this munitions factory (where some 1,200 men were employed in round-the-clock shifts to supply the war effort). At about 8:40 am. on the morning of Saturday, August 18, 1917 a terrific blast occurred on the TNT production line, followed in quick succession by two other explosions as stored depots of explosives ignited.

      The entire plant and much of the surrounding towns of Dragon, Hudson and Rigaud where devastated by the blast. Luckily only one man was killed (the plant manager Gordon Shortrede) and six others injured.

      Hubert's wife, Ethel Mairi Garnett, along with a number of other people in the town were not found until three days after the explosion. The event undoubtedly had a profound effect on those who lived through it. Apart from the great explosion in Halifax harbor (also in 1917), the catastrophe at Dragon was the most powerful civilian blast to have taken place in Canada during the war.

      The plant was later reopened by its old owners, Northern Explosives, and carried on operations on a smaller scale until 1927 when it was purchased by CIL and closed down. At that point, Hubert and the Garnett family (which by then included three children: Nancy Isobel born 1914; Edmund Jasper "Ted" born 1916; and Geoffrey born 1918) moved to McMasterville, Quebec.

      Hubert continued to work for the CIL explosives division at the McMasterville plant until his retirement at age 65 in 1946 after over 25 years of service to the company.

      In McMasterville the Garnett family lived first at a house located beside the Beloeil railway station on Richelieu Boulevard overlooking the river and the tressel bridge to Otterburn Park. Later, in the 1940s, Hubert purchased a house on Orsali Street in Beloeil where he and his wife continued to live until Ethel Mairi became incapacitated and was confined to a nursing home in Lachine, Quebec. She died there on March 12, 1961 and was buried in Hudson Heights not far from the site of the 1917 Dragon explosion.

      Hubert sold the house on Orsali Street and lived with his daughter Nancy and her husband George Russell LUSBY at 553 Montee-des-Trente, St-Hilaire from 1962 until 1977.

      Hubert Garnett died on July 11, 1977 at Hospital D'Argenteuil in Lachute, Quebec at the age of 96 years. He was buried next to his wife in the cemetery of St. James Anglican Church in Hudson Heights. Funeral arrangements were made through the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home in Lachute.

      At the time of his death, he was survived by his daughter Nancy Isobel LUSBY, and two sons Edmund Jasper ("Ted") GARNETT, and Geoffrey GARNETT.

      In addition to his immediate children, Hubert Garnett was also survived by eight grandchildren:

      Donald Geoffrey GARNETT (1947)

      Douglas James GARNETT (1947)

      Clifford LUSBY (1949)

      Brian GARNETT (1952)

      Brenda GARNETT (1955)

      Robert "Bobby" GARNETT (1958)

      Natalie GARNETT (?)

      Edmund "Teddy" GARNETT (?)

      Under the provisions of his last Will and Testament (written and dated September 21, 1962 and probated upon his death by the Superior Court, district of St-Hyacinthe) Hubert Garnett instructed that the entire proceeds of his estate be divided equally among his three surviving children. The total net value of the estate at time of death amounted to $33,000.

      Hubert GARNETT was the seventh child of the Reverend Richard Craven
      GARNETT and Charlotte Isabel LEACH. He was born at Northwich, Cheshire
      on November 2 8, 1881 during the period when his father was Rector of the
      Delamere parish church (1873-1889). The family lived then in a house at
      37 Northwich Road, De lamere.
      The Reverend Garnett and his family moved to Settle, NorthYorkshire in
      1889 when Hubert was eight years old, and it was there that Hubert went
      to school and where the family continued to reside until 1901 when
      Reverend Garnett accepted the post of Rector at Salwarpe, Worchester.
      Hubert grew up in a large family---nine of the eleven children of Richard
      and Charlotte Garnett survived to maturity. Several of Hubert's sisters
      (Marion, Kate, Isobel) are known to have been active in the church, but
      little is currently known about Hubert's childhood, education, or
      religious devotions.
      At some point in the early 1900s, Hubert met and married Ethel Mairi
      CLAYTON], daughter of George Edward CLAYTON and Sarah Jane VEEVERS. The
      date, place and circumstances of this marriage are as yet unknown, but
      their meeting and marriage perhaps occurred in Settle since both families
      lived in that area.
      In about 1910 or 1912, they emigrated to Canada and resided close to
      Montreal. It is thought that Hubert was employed for a time on the
      construction of the Blue Bonnets racetrack in Montreal.
      When the Great War broke out in 1914, the Northern Explosives munitions
      plant at Dragon, Quebec (which had been founded in 1907 by Colonel James
      Riley and his brother Major George Riley) was taken over by the English
      munitions firm of Curtiss and Harvey.
      Hubert Garnett's great great grandfather, Richard CRAVEN and his brothers
      are believed to have been partners in the original formation of the
      Curtiss and Harvey gunpowder company. It is perhaps through this
      connection that Hubert came to work for the company plant at Dragon.
      During World War I, Hubert was working at the Northern Explosives
      munitions factory (where some 1,200 men were employed in round-the-clock
      shifts to supply the war effort). At about 8:40 am. on the morning of
      Saturday, August 18, 1917 a terrific blast occurred on the TNT production
      line, followed in quick succession by two other explosions as stored
      depots of explosives ignited.
      The entire plant and much of the surrounding towns of Dragon, Hudson and
      Rigaud were devastated by the blast. Luckily only one man was killed
      (the plant manager Gordon Shortrede) and six others injured.
      Hubert' s wife, Ethel Mairi Garnett, along with a number of other people
      in the town were not found until three days after the explosion. The
      event undoubtedly had a profound effect on those who lived through it.
      Apart from the great explosion in Halifax harbor (also in 1917), the
      catastrophe at Dragon was the most powerful civilian blast to have taken
      place in Canada during the war.
      The plant was later reopened by its old owners, Northern Explosives, and
      carried on operations on a smaller scale until 1927 when it was purchased
      by CIL and closed down. At that point, Hubert and the Garnett family
      (which by then included three children: Nancy Isobel born 1914; Edmund
      Jasper "Ted" born 1916; and Geoffrey born 1918) moved to McMasterville,
      Quebec.
      Hubert continued to work for the CIL explosives division at the company's
      plant in McMasterville, Quebec until his retirement at age 65 in 1946
      after over 25 years of service to the company.
      In McMasterville the Garnett family lived first at a house located beside
      the Beloeil railway station on Richelieu Boulevard overl ooking the river
      and the tressel bridge to Otterburn Park. Later, in the 1940s, Hubert
      purchased a house on Orsali Street in Beloeil where he and his wife
      continued to live until Ethel Mairi became incapacitated and was
      confined to a nursing home in Lachine, Quebec.


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