Governor Edmund Jennings Randolph

Governor Edmund Jennings Randolph

Male 1753 - 1812  (59 years)    Has more than 250 ancestors and 29 descendants in this family tree.

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Edmund Jennings Randolph 
    Prefix Governor 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 10 Aug 1753  Tazewell, Williamsburg, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 12 Sep 1812  Carter Hall, Clarke?, VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I208214  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 17 Jan 2002 

    Father John Randolph, 'The Loyalist, the Tory',   b. 1727,   d. 1784  (Age 57 years) 
    Mother Arianna Jennings,   b. 1727,   d. 1801  (Age 74 years) 
    Family ID F88975  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth Nicholas,   b. 11 Aug 1752, Gloucester, VA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 29 Aug 1776  VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Susan Beverley Randolph,   b. 1781, Frederick Co., Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1836  (Age 55 years)
     2. Peyton Randolph,   b. 1787, Gloucester, VA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1828  (Age 41 years)
     3. Edmonia Madison Randolph,   b. 17 Apr 1787,   d. Oct 1847  (Age 60 years)
     4. Lucy Nelson Randolph
    Last Modified 25 Mar 2001 
    Family ID F88972  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Entered history as an American founding father, member of the Continental Congress and later Governor of Virginia (1786-88), the first US Attorney General and the 2nd US Secretary of State, succeeding his kinsman Thomas Jefferson in this function. Edmund Jennings Randolph was less fortunate as far as his estate was concerned. He had been disinherited by his wealthy father on political differences but instituted the main heir of his uncle Peyton Randolph. Unfortunately the latter's estate was in trouble and by his obstination to keep the slaves instead of selling them to settle debts, his inheritance actually drained on his personal resources, leaving him with but modest means for a Randolph. This kind of situation would repeat in the family when Thomas Jefferson died, leaving his estate, once considered grand, in a desperate situation of accumulated debts and mismanagement.


Home Page |  What's New |  Most Wanted |  Surnames |  Photos |  Histories |  Documents |  Cemeteries |  Places |  Dates |  Reports |  Sources