Admiral Cuthbert  Collingwood

Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood[1]

Male 1748 - 1810  (61 years)    Has 23 ancestors and 7 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Cuthbert Collingwood 
    Prefix Admiral 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 24 Oct 1748  Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Battle 8 Sep 1793 - 19 Dec 1793  Siege of Toulon Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Battle 1 Jun 1794  Atlantic Ocean south of Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Battle 14 Feb 1797  Cape St Vincent Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Battle 21 Oct 1805  Cape Trafalgar Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 7 Mar 1810 
    Buried St. Paul's Cathedral Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • near Nelson
    Person ID I155061  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 14 Apr 2009 

    Father Cuthbert Collingwood,   b. 1712,   d. 15 Feb 1775  (Age 63 years) 
    Mother Milcah Dobson,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Siblings 9 siblings 
    Family ID F82405  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah Blackett,   b. 1762,   d. 16 Sep 1819  (Age 57 years) 
    Married 8 Jun 1791 
    Children 
     1. Sarah Collingwood,   b. 1792,   d. 1837  (Age 45 years)
     2. Mary Patience Collingwood,   b. 1793,   d. Aft 1819  (Age 27 years)
    Last Modified 14 Aug 2009 
    Family ID F34607  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBattle -
    Siege de Toulon - 8 Sep 1793 - 19 Dec 1793 - Siege of Toulon
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBattle -
    Glorious 1st of June - 1 Jun 1794 - Atlantic Ocean south of Ireland
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBattle -
    Battle of Cape St Vincent - 14 Feb 1797 - Cape St Vincent
    Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBattle -
    Battle of Trafalgar - 21 Oct 1805 - Cape Trafalgar
    Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    155061.jpg
    155061.jpg

    Documents
    The Ascendancy of Gibraltar during the Age of Napoleon (1793-1815)
    The Ascendancy of Gibraltar during the Age of Napoleon (1793-1815)
    Becoming Nelson's Refuge and Wellington's Rock

    Histories 2 histories

  • Notes 
    • he entered the Royal Navy as a volunteer on board HMS Shannon under Captain Richard Brathwaite, his maternal cousin

      To get accepted onto a ship as a potential officer, one needed some sort of influence. Collingwood was sponsored by two relatives, Richard Braithwaite and Robert Roddam, both of whom who were to become Admirals

      Collingwood went to sea at the age of 12 and served for several years on the home station.. In 1774 he served on the North American service and was at the Battle of Bunker Hill, winning his lieutenancy there on 17th June 1775. In 1776 he was Lieutenant of the sloop Hornet in the West Indies and thereafter began his close association with Nelson.
      In 1786, Collingwood returned home and with the exception of one brief command remained there until 1782. On the outbreak of the French Revolutionary wars, he was appointed flag captain and took part in Lord Howe's victory on the Glorious First of June. He later engaged in the blockade of Toulon and took a Conspicuous part i Sir John Jervis victory off St. Vincent. In 1799 Collingwood became rear admiral and he was at sea in the Triumph and other ships until the peace of Amines in 1802.
      On the renewal of hostilities, Collingwoodwas at once employed, chiefly in blockading Brest. he remained there until May 1805, having been promoted to Vice Admiral in May 1804, when he was given command of a small squadron which he placed off Cadiz to blockade the port. There he was joined by Nelson, and became Nelson' second in command, in the Battle of Trafalgar, he carried out the part assigned to him brilliantly. With 15 ship he attacked the rear of the enemy to prevent their escape and after Nelson' death accomplished the difficult task of conserving the fleet and its prizes during the storm that followed.
      He was created Baron Collingwood and granted a pension of £2,000 a year. Collingwood held the Mediterranean command with distinction until his death, he died at sea .

  • Sources 


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