26th President Theodore  Roosevelt

26th President Theodore Roosevelt

Male 1858 - 1919  (60 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and 17 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Theodore Roosevelt 
    Prefix 26th President 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 27 Oct 1858  New York City, NY, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Jan 1919  Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Youngs Mem. Cem., Oyster Bay, Long Island Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I15330  Geneagraphie
    Links To This person is also Theodore Roosevelt at Wikipedia 
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2001 

    Father Theodore Roosevelt,   b. 22 Sep 1831,   d. 9 Feb 1878  (Age 46 years) 
    Mother Martha Bulloch,   b. 8 Jul 1834,   d. 14 Feb 1884  (Age 49 years) 
    Married 22 Dec 1853 
    Siblings 4 siblings 
    Family ID F5355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Alice Hathaway Lee,   b. 29 Jul 1861, Chestnut Hill, Boston, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Feb 1884, New York City, NY, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 22 years) 
    Married 27 Oct 1880  Brookline, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Alice Lee Roosevelt,   b. 12 Feb 1884, New York City, NY, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1980, Washington, DC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 96 years)
    Last Modified 14 Nov 2001 
    Family ID F29941  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Edith Kermit Carow,   b. 6 Aug 1861, Norwich, Conn, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1948, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Married 2 Dec 1886  London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr.,   b. 13 Sep 1887, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jul 1944, Omaha Beach, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     2. Kermit Roosevelt,   b. 10 Oct 1889, Oyster Bay, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jun 1943, Alaska Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     3. Ethel Carow Roosevelt,   b. 13 Aug 1891, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Dec 1977, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     4. Archibald Bulloch Roosevelt,   b. 9 Apr 1894, Washington, DC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1979, Palm Springs, Florida Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     5. Quentin Roosevelt,   b. 19 Nov 1897, Washington, DC, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1919, Cambrai, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 21 years)
    Last Modified 28 Mar 2001 
    Family ID F29942  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 27 Oct 1858 - New York City, NY, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 2 Dec 1886 - London, Middlesex, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
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  • Notes 
    • http://www.theodore-roosevelt.com/

      President of the United States 1901-1909, Nobel Prize for Peace 1906
      Ascended to the presidency through the death of William McKinley. Won the 1904 election over Alton B. Parker by a popular vote of 7,628,461 to 5,084,223 and an electoral vote of 336 to 140. Nickname "Teddy"; a cartoon of Roosevelt in The Washington Post depicting the tenderhearted President refusing to shoot a bear cub inspiring the "teddy bear". Became the first American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. Made another bid for the high office in 1912, because he was dissatisfied with William Taft's performance.
      With the assassination of President McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, not quite 43, became the youngest President in the Nation's history. He brought new excitement and power to the Presidency, as he vigorously led Congress and the American public toward progressive reforms and a strong foreign policy. He took the view that the President as a "steward of the people" should take whatever action necessary for the public good unless expressly forbidden by law or the Constitution." I did not usurp power," he wrote, "but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power."
      Roosevelt's youth differed sharply from that of the log cabin Presidents. He was born in New York City in 1858 into a wealthy family, but he too struggled--against ill health--and in his triumph became an advocate of the strenuous life. In 1884 his first wife, Alice Lee Roosevelt, and his mother died on the same day. Roosevelt spent much of the next two years on his ranch in the Badlands of Dakota Territory. There he mastered his sorrow as he lived in the saddle, driving cattle, hunting big game--he even captured an outlaw. On a visit to London, he married Edith Carow in December 1886. During the Spanish-American War, Roosevelt was lieutenant colonel of the Rough Rider Regiment, which he led on a charge at the battle of San Juan. He was one of the most conspicuous heroes of the war. Boss Tom Platt, needing a hero to draw attention away from scandals in New York State, accepted Roosevelt as the Republican candidate for Governor in 1898. Roosevelt won and served with distinction. As President, Roosevelt held the ideal that the Government should be the great arbiter of the conflicting economic forces in the Nation, especially between capital and labor, guaranteeing justice to each and dispensing favors to none.
      Roosevelt emerged spectacularly as a "trust buster" by forcing the dissolution of a great railroad combination in the Northwest. Other antitrust suits under the Sherman Act followed. Roosevelt steered the United States more actively into world politics. He liked to quote a favorite proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick. . . . " Aware of the strategic need for a shortcut between the Atlantic and Pacific, Roosevelt ensured the construction of the Panama
      Canal. His corollary to the Monroe Doctrine prevented the establishment of foreign bases in the Caribbean and arrogated the sole right of intervention in Latin America to the United States. He won the Nobel Peace Prize (1906) for mediating the Russo-Japanese War, reached a Gentleman's Agreement on immigration with Japan, and sent the Great White Fleet on a goodwill tour of the world. Some of Theodore Roosevelt's most effective achievements were in conservation. He added enormously to the national forests in the West, reserved lands for public use, and fostered great irrigation projects. He crusaded endlessly on matters big and small, exciting audiences with his high-pitched voice, jutting jaw, and pounding fist. "The life of strenuous endeavor" was a must for those around him, as he romped with his five younger children and led ambassadors on hikes through Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C.
      Leaving the Presidency in 1909, Roosevelt went on an African safari, then jumped back into politics. In 1912 he ran for President on a Progressive ticket. To reporters he once remarked that he felt as fit as a bull moose, the name of his new party On October 14, 1912, while campaigning in Milwaukee, Roosevelt was shot in the chest by an assailant. The candidate insisted on delivering a scheduled speech, which lasted almost an hour. He was then rushed from the amazed crowd to a hospital. Wilson and Taft stopped their campaigns while Roosevelt recovered, but the former president was delivering speeches again within two weeks. His words at that time would have been applicable at the time of his death in 1919: "No man has had a happier life than I have led; a happier life in every way." Roosevelt's heroic campaigning, however, could not overcome the split he had caused among Republicans. Second-place Roosevelt and third-place Taft together received over a million more popular votes than Democrat Woodrow Wilson, but with his opposition divided, Wilson won the election. The Progressives asked Roosevelt to run for president again in 1916, but Roosevelt declined and supported Republican Charles Evans Hughes, who lost to President Wilson. In 1916 Roosevelt had begun to make plans for raising a volunteer division that he would command if the United States entered World War I. When the United States did enter the war in 1917, he went to the White House to request
      authority to implement his plans, but Wilson turned him down. During the war, Roosevelt was a leading Republican spokesman and likely would have been his party's candidate for president in 1920 had he lived. He was hospitalized in November 1918 with a severe attack of rheumatism, an ailment from which he suffered during the last years of his life. He returned to Sagamore Hill for Christmas but remained ill. He died in his sleep on January 6, 1919, from an arterial blood clot.


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