Prince Jaroslav Vladimirovitch, I

Prince Jaroslav Vladimirovitch, I

Male 980 - 1054  (74 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Jaroslav Vladimirovitch   [1, 2
    Prefix Prince 
    Suffix
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 978-980  Kiev, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Died 20 Feb 1053-1054  Kiev, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I14521  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 

    Father Duke Vladimir Swjatoslawowitsch von Kiew, I, "Velikiy",   b. Abt 955, Kiev, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1015, Bereshkow Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 60 years) 
    Mother Rogneda Polotzki,   b. 962, Polotsk, Byelorussia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1002  (Age 40 years) 
    Married Abt 977  Polotsk, Byelorussia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 6 siblings 
    Family ID F5099  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Ingigerd Olafsdottir,   b. Abt 1001, Uppsala, Sweden Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Feb 1049-1050, Kiev, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 49 years) 
    Married Feb 1018-1019  Uppsala, Sweden Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Prince Vladimir von Nowgorod,   b. 1020,   d. 1052  (Age 32 years)
     2. Großherzog Izyaslav Dimitrij von Kiew, I,   b. 1025,   d. 3 Oct 1078  (Age 53 years)
     3. Großherzog Svjatoslav von Kiew und Tschernigov, I-II,   b. 1027, Vladimir, Volynskiy, Volyn, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1076  (Age 49 years)
     4. Vsevolod I von Kiew,   b. 1030,   d. 1093  (Age 63 years)
     5. Elisabeth Jaroslawna von Kiew,   b. 1032, Kiev, Ukraine Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Anastasia Yaroslavna,   d. 1074
     7. Anna Yaroslavna,   b. 1036,   d. Aft 1075  (Age 40 years)
     8. Prinz Igor Yaroslavich von Smolensk,   b. Abt 1036, Vladimir, Volynskiy, Volyn Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1059-1060, Vladimir, Volynskiy, Volyn Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 24 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2010 
    Family ID F5100  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Prince of Kiev, the Great Duke of Russia and the Prince of Holmgarth.
      Grand Duke of Kiev, Grand Prince of Novgorod & Kiev.
      Acceded: 1019.

      Burke calls him Great Duke of Russia. Snorri Sturlasson call him Prince of Holmgarth and shows his children as Holti-Nimble, Vissivald, Ellisif.

      Donald Lines Jacobus (1883-1970), the "Founder of Scientific Genealogy in America" wrote an article in The American Genealogist (TAG) 9:13-15 entitled "The House of Rurik." I quote:
      "To correct the many errors that have appeared in print, and to aid those who follow the pastime of tracing "royal ancestry," the following condensed account of the early Rurikides is here printed. It is based in large part on "Genealogies et Mariages Occidentaux des Rurikides Russes du Xe au XIIIe Siecle," published at Rome in 1927 as Vol. IX, No. 1, of *Orientalia Christiana.* The author, N. de Baumgarten, is probably the best living authority on early Russian history, and every statement made on the fourteen genealogical tables of his monograph is fully supported by the citation of contemporary documents and chronicles."

      I am not attacking Jacobus, who is a giant among genealogists and certainly needs no defenders. Neither am I disagreeing with Alexander Agamov, in Moscow, who has pointed out that there is no credible evidence that Rurik was ever "Prince of Kiev" and progenitor of the line beginning with Igor, Grand Prince of Kiev, who married Olga. I hope Alexander Agamov is reading this. Some historians and genealogists, Russians in particular, have taken sharp issue with the theory that the Kievan Rus was founded by a "Dane" rather than a "Slav"----and the evidence for "The Varangian Theory" seems fragmentary and inconclusive, at best.
      G. Andrews Moriarty and Walter L. Sheppard in TAG 28:91-95 also quote the N. de Baumgarten material as authoritative [specifically "Orientalia Christiana, No. 119, N. de Baumgarten, "Aux Origines de la Russie," p. 79. Both Jacobus and Moriarty/Sheppard headline their charts with "Rurik (d. 879) Grand Prince of Kiev." Jacobus probably did not read 10th to 13th century Russian. But--- some of us may.
      For anyone who might conceivably have access to the original, 1927, N. de Baumgarten source---is it provable that, "every statement made on the fourteen genealogical tables of his monograph is fully supported by the citation of contemporary documents and chronicles?"
      Or, is it possible that Jacobus and the other experts simply trusted in N. de Baumgarten's scholarship and professionalism---and did not really check out the facts themselves. The Editor of a journal, such as TAG, certainly cannot check out every fact and document himself. But, in this particular case, Jacobus gives the N. de Baumgarten material his personal imprimatur, as cited above [TAG 9:13, Paragraph 2]
      So----has N. de Baumgarten in his "Orientalia Christiana"---dealing with "The House of Rurik"---been totally discredited by subsequent rigorous scholarship---or does his judgment still seem credible to some serious scholars----or are there alternate explanations?
      This is an intriguing question of interest to many folks who are descended from Anne of Kiev (c. 1024-c.1066) [Anna Yaroslavna] who married
      Henry I, King of France.
      Grand Duke of Kiev 1019-1054

      When his father died in 1015, strife occurred between Jaroslav and his brothers. Svyatopolk, the eldest, murdered Boris, Gleb and Syvatoslav, and then was driven out by Jaroslav. Of the other brothers, Izyaslav remained safe in Polotzk, and Sudislav was imprisoned. Until 1036 Mstislav in Tmutorokan prevented Jaroslav, from being an absolute ruler as their father had been. Boris and Gleb were venerated as the first Russian saints.

      Jaroslav, like his father, ruled for thirty-five years. He brought prosperity to Kiev while the arts and literature flourished, and the cathedral of St. Sophia was built. In 1030 he conquered Estonia and a year later, with his brother Mstislav's support, he attacked Poland. Mstislav died in 1036, leaving Jaroslav as the sole ruler. At last he defeated the Pechenegs; in the ensuing peace Christianity flourished and new monasteries were built. Before his death he divided his lands between his five sons.

  • Sources 
    1. [S14] University of Hull Royal Database (England), Brian Tompsett, (copyright 1994, 1995, 1996 , , Repository: WWW, University of Hull, Hull, UK HU6 7RX bct@tardis.ed.ac.uk).

    2. [S5] Familiearchief Weebers, A.A.M. en W.Th.M. Weebers, (Opgesteldca. 1920 - 1930).


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