Charles David van Lennep

Charles David van Lennep

Male 1818 - 1886  (68 years)    Has 58 ancestors and 36 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Charles David van Lennep 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 01 Mar 1818  Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 20 Aug 1886  Malcajik Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1398633  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 

    Father Richard van Lennep,   b. 15 Dec 1779, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Sep 1827, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Mother Adèle Marie von Heidenstam,   b. 05 Feb 1790, Pera Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jun 1867, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Siblings 7 siblings 
    Family ID F1298881  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Helene Louise Elisabeth Abbott 
    Married 02 Apr 1847  Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Hélène Louise Adèle van Lennep,   b. 14 Feb 1848, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1927, Nice Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     2. Eveline Eulalie van Lennep,   b. 09 Feb 1849, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Apr 1937, South Kensington, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
     3. Charles Richard van Lennep,   b. 12 Apr 1850, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Oct 1918, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
    +4. Alfred Oscar van Lennep,   b. 08 Apr 1851, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 29 May 1913  (Age 62 years)
    +5. Oscar Charles van Lennep,   b. 06 Nov 1857, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 May 1928, Athens, Greece Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F1298973  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Eliza Anne Ogilvy,   b. 1833-1834, Liverpool Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Jul 1872, Waldron, Sussex) Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years) 
    Married Abt 1866 
    Children 
     1. Ralph Ogilvy van Lennep,   b. 17 Sep 1867, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Dec 1867, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +2. Cyril Charles Ogilvy van Lennep,   b. 30 Aug 1869, Malcajik Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 May 1959, Alverstoke, Hants Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F1298974  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 01 Mar 1818 - Smyrna Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 02 Apr 1847 - Smyrna Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Charles David van Lennep
    Charles David van Lennep

    Documents
    The van Lennep Genealogy - Smyrna Branch
    The van Lennep Genealogy - Smyrna Branch

  • Notes 
    • Knight of the Order of the North Star
    • partner in the firm Van Lennep & Co, commission agents (with
      Auguste O. van Lennep, Edouard W. van Lennep and David van Lennep 1848-),
      tobacco planter in Malcajik (New Bulgurca) ?little treasure?, owner of a farm of about 16,000
      English acres, consul of Sweden and Norway in Smyrna, short-story writer and novelist,
      author of the novel Anthoula, published in Paris
    • Besides his involvement with his business and consular activities for Sweden and Norway, Charles David van Lennep also took a great interest in his farm Malcajik.
      This was a large estate of some 16,000 acres approximately 20 miles south of Smyrna at a place now known as Bulgurca. The first parcels of land were bought in partnership with his elder brother Richard Jacob (James), but as Richard already had an interest in another piece of land, he soon sold his stake to Charles David.
      The house at Malcajik, which they called Tahilick, was a two-storied building of a typical Anatolian style, on a square plan surrounding a court yard. The living quarters were on the second floor, for the sake of both convenience and safety, while the ground floor served as storage space both for the farm and domestic use. There was a water well next to the oven on one side of the courtyard. Some mulberry trees provided shade and at night became a roosting place for the many chickens. The courtyard was closed at sundown by a heavy door.
      Since the middle of the 19th century the track of the Smyrna & Aidin Railway Company passed within three miles of Malcajik and a small nearby station provided convenient access to the occasional passing goods train with some passenger accommodation. There were almost no real roads, only tracks, so that all traffic was either on horseback or, for cargo, by camel caravan or mule train, a means of transport still competitive for farm produce until the beginning of the twentieth century.
      On the southern edge of the estate the actual village of Malcajik, consisting of some 35 simple houses, straddled the river Takhtali. The houses on the north bank were occupied by the Greek Orthodox community, while Turks lived on the south bank. In a bend of the Takhtali, at a point where a small tributary joined it, lay the large fruit and vegetable garden of Malcajik. Although the actual arable land consisted of a parcel of some six by three miles on the valley floor, the entire property covered some 16,000 acres because under Turkish law any land adjoining the foothills automatically incorporated all the adjacent scrublands above it up to the watershed. Although such land could not be used for growing crops without extensive clearance and terracing, it could be used for grazing sheep, goats andbuffalo, it was of value as a supply of irewood, and it provided a fine opportunity for hunting.
      The arable land was leased to tenants. These were provided with accommodation consisting of a modest hut or cottage, and some tools such as a plough as well as the seeds for the forthcoming season. The tenant paid for this lease in kind by surrendering 50 percent of the produce. The main crop was a high quality tobacco, but grapes were grown to be dried as raisins while olives were grown for olive oil for private consumption together with the other fruits and vegetables from their large vegetable garden.
      Charles David had a great interest in modern farming practices and with time he introduced a new plough and bred a water buffalo which was considerably stronger than the local oxen. By grafting good quality stock onto the local wild pear trees he managed to grow excellent fruit. He later even introduced the first American steampowered ploughs and a steam-powered saw for cutting planks etc.
      To gain some profit from the higher scrub land he made an agreement with the charcoal burners whereby they could cut wood at the higher elevations up to the watershed for a share in the profits, while he leased the lower scrub land to shepherds for grazing.
      Mary, the first wife of the missionary Henry John van Lennep, gave the following description of theTchiflick (her spelling) in May 1844:
      We then reached a wide plain where at the far edge just this side of the hills, we could see the little houses of Tchiflick. We could see the red roofs long before our arrival as these houses were built in the foot hills above the plain.
      Every now and then we passed the black tents of the nomadic Turks and the camels would raise their curious heads to stare at us with their large brown eyes and long black eye lashes.
      Tchiflick is the big hobby of our family. On this farm, which is set in the most beautiful landscape, they are introducing new American and European farming techniques. The American plough has already been introduced and they intend shortly to make a decent cart track between Sevdiköy and Tchiflick. It is a large estate, six miles long by three miles wide, an enchanting place. There is a large garden with fruit trees and vegetable plots, and the trees in the wood are taller than anywhere else. Indeed being surrounded by such beautiful trees which hide the chasm, I do not miss the American trees.
      Shortly after the death of Charles? first wife, Helen Louise Elisabeth Abbott, David Stuart Ogilvy and his two sisters visited Malcajik. Their Scottish father was a successful businessman trading in the Far East and his son and two oldest daughters were engaged on a ?grand tour? of Egypt and the Levant. Shortly after their arrival there were two weddings; Charles David married the eldest daughter, Eliza Ann Ogilvy (1832 - 1872) while David Stuart married Charles David?s oldest daughter, Eveline Eulalie. A description of Eliza Ann reads as follows: ?She is a woman whose countenance could not fail to arrest attention of a stranger: her finely moulded features were radiant with goodness, while her dark blue eyes were full of tenderness and intelligence.? Some ten years later Charles David?s son, Charles Richard, would marry the younger sister, Isabelle Mary Ogilvy. The family ties between the Van Lennep and Ogilvy families would become even more intertwined when David Stuart?s daughter Eveline Maud married Pieter Charles van Lennep.
      Sadly, Eliza Ann died of tuberculosis shortly after giving birth to Cyril Charles, just three years after their marriage. She had gone back to their ancestral home in Scotland thinking the treatment in Scotland would be better there than in Smyrna. She had taken Cyril Charles with her and he would be brought up in England and Scotland under the loving care of Eliza Ann?s youngest sister, Helen Rose (1837 - 1925), spending his holidays in the large Ogilvy family home at Corrimony some 25 miles from Inverness. Unfortunately this large Victorian house in its beautiful wild surroundings would later be totally burnt down.
      After the death of Charles David, his son Oscar Charles would continue to manage the farm. Upon completion of his schooling in England, Cyril Charles joined him as junior assistant. However, when seven years later his prospective bride came over from England and decided that life at Malcajik was not for her, he returned to England to trade in tobacco in London.
      In March of 1902 Gertrude Bell (1868 - 1926) came to visit Oscar Charles. She was an Anglo-American lady who had travelled widely across the Levant and Middle East and would later, during and after the First World War, be influential in the Allied decisions on the arrangements for the dismemberment of the Ottoman Empire. In a letter to her mother she wrote:
      They (the van Lenneps) talk no tongue properly - Greek the best I expect; English with that funny clipped intonation of the Levant and French very fluently and uglily. Mr. van Lennep is of Dutch nationality but has never been to Holland, speaks no Dutch among his many languages and sees none of his Dutch cousins. She is greek, a very pleasant cheerful good natured woman, like a child, amused with everything, but capable with her dairy and her house, all of which she has to look after down the smallest detail. He is a visionary sort of creature, forever discovering some deposit of mineral on his farm which is to make his fortune in no time, but the fortune has not yet been made. He is extremely kind and nice, devoted to his children and I think with a secret respect for anyone who comes out of the big world he doesn?t know.
      After the collapse of the Greek invasion of western Turkey in the late summer of 1922 the victorious Turkish forces arrived. The regular troops were preceded by what became known as the ?bashi-bazouks?, the irregular mercenaries, renowned for their raping and pillaging. Oscar just managed to escape them on the last train that left for Smyrna, abandoning all he had lived for. All the Greeks who had worked at Malcajik were deported to Greece, a country they did not know except as an historical myth and where they had no roots.
      Having escaped the great fire of Smyrna in September of that year, Oscar moved to Athens. No one has ever claimed or has been able to assign responsibility for that fire, which destroyed most of Smyrna proper including most of the European districts.
      Sources: Cyril Charles Ogilvy van Lennep, with an introduction by Edward David Ogilvy van Lennep: Malcajik, an Asia-Minor Farm in the Eighteen Nineties (Saxmundham 2003);
      Henry John van Lennep, Ten Days Amongst Greek Brigands, a True Story (1874);
      The Gertrude Bell Archive, the Robinson Library, University of Newcastle, (www.gerty.ncl.ac.uk); E.J. Zürcher, Het Moderne Turkije, Amsterdam 2006);
      Memoir of Mrs. Mary E. Van Lennep: only daughter of the Rev. Joel Hawes and wife of the Rev. Henry J. Van Lennep, missionary in Turkey / by her mother (Hartford 1850), reprint The University of Michigan.


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