Henry John van Lennep

Henry John van Lennep

Male 1815 - 1889  (73 years)    Has 58 ancestors and 32 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Henry John van Lennep 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 18 Mar 1815  Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Jan 1889  Great Barrington, Berkshire CO, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1398432  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 

    Father Richard van Lennep,   b. 15 Dec 1779, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Sep 1827, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Mother Adèle Marie von Heidenstam,   b. 05 Feb 1790, Pera Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jun 1867, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Siblings 7 siblings 
    Family ID F1298881  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Emma L. Bliss,   d. 7 Sep 1840, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 03 Nov 1839  West Springfield, Hampden, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F1299033  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mary Elisabeth Hawes,   b. 16 Apr 1821, Hartford Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Sep 1844, Constantinople, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 23 years) 
    Married 04 Sep 1843  Hartford, Conn. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F1299035  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Emily Ann Bird,   b. 1825, Beiruth Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jan 1898, Philadelphia, PA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 18 Apr 1850  Hartford, Conn. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Henry Augustus van Lennep,   b. 14 Mar 1851, Constantinople, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 05 Oct 1853, Tokat Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
    +2. Prof. Dr. William Bird van Lennep,   b. 05 Dec 1853,   d. 09 Jan 1919, Philadelphia, PA, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    +3. Edward James van Lennep,   b. 26 Jul 1956, Tokat Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Apr 1946, Great Barrington, Berkshire CO, MA Find all individuals with events at this location
    +4. Henry Martijn van Lennep,   b. 08 Sep 1859, Tokat Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Aug 1940, London, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     5. Marie Louise van Lennep,   b. 14 Aug 1863, Hartford Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1865, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     6. Charles David van Lennep,   b. 02 Apr 1866, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Dec 1867, Smyrna Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
    Last Modified 15 Jan 2013 
    Family ID F1298883  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 18 Mar 1815 - Smyrna Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 11 Jan 1889 - Great Barrington, Berkshire CO, MA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Richard van Lennep and his sons
    Richard van Lennep and his sons
    From left to right standing: Augustus Oscar (1821-..), Edouard Willem (1825-1880), Gustave Adolphe (1816-1863);
    sitting from left to right: David (1826/8-1910), Richard Jacob (1811-1890), Henry John (1815-1889).
    Only Charles David is absent.

    Documents
    The van Lennep Genealogy - Smyrna Branch
    The van Lennep Genealogy - Smyrna Branch

  • Notes 
    • linguist (Turkish, Greek, Armenian),
      painter,
      sent to school in U.S. in 1830, Mount Pleasant School in Amherst,
      graduated Amherst College 1837,
      missionary Congregational Church in Smyrna 1839-1844, Constantinople 1844-1854, Tokat (Turkey) 1854-1861, in the U.S.A. 1861-1863, in Smyrna 1863-1869,
      university professor in natural sciences, Greek and modern languages Ingham University, Le Roy (N.Y.),
      managing director and owner Sedgwick School for boys in Great Barrington,
      author in Armenian among other languages
    • The only son of Richard van Lennep who did not go in for a career in business was Henry John. Together with his younger brother Gustave Adolphe he was sent by their parents to be educated in the United States at Mount Pleasant School in Amherst and the Hartford Grammar School. Gustave Adolphe returned to Smyrna in about 1835, while Henry John continued his education at Amherst College. During his college years he decided to become a missionary and after graduation from Amherst in 1837 he spent a year at Andover Theological Seminary. He completed his training under the direction of a theologian and was ordained Congregational preacher the 27th of August 1839.
      Shortly after marrying Emma Bliss he left for Turkey together with his new wife as a missionary for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. This board had been created in 1812 as a variant of the Dutch Réveil Movement and had since 1830 begun spreading the ?true? gospel amongst Jews, Greeks and Armenians in the Near and Far East. Their missionaries also concentrated on education so that under their direction an extensive network of schools was created in the Levant.
      Henry John?s first posting was in his birthplace, Smyrna. Unfortunately his marriage did not last long as Emma died in 1840. After travelling extensively in Turkey and Greece, Henry John returned to the United States in 1843, where he married for the second time, this time Mary Elisabeth Hawes, the daughter of his former tutor. Sadly, his second wife also died in Constantinople in September 1844 within a year of their marriage. She did however leave a diary which together with some letters were subsequently published by her mother and of which we include the following paragraphs:
      (19 Jan. 1844) Our house is delightful. It stands near the seaside and we have a garden filled with roses, orange and lemon trees which are now in bloom while also bearing fruit. The view from our terrace is the finest I ever looked upon. The Smyrna gulf is surrounded by noble and picturesque mountains, all of which coloured in an exquisite violet and rose, so typical of this part of the world. An Austrian frigate is anchored some forty rods from the house and, when the flag is lowered at sunset, their band plays with exquisite taste, a slow and solemn hymn.
      A month later, the 22nd of February, she writes:
      The streets are dark, narrow and dirty, but you only have to knock at one of those solid barn like doors, and you are at once ushered into a court yard, often beautifully paved, and pass into apartments which lead to rooms and apartments which are so romantic they seem to be come straight from a fairy tale. There are a large number of Europeans, Franks as they are called locally.
      For the most part these are Catholic. In fact the Protestants form only a small insignificant group amongst the Greeks, the Catholics, the Jews and the Armenians and the many others from all over the world. A turbaned head is all too familiar.
      Our friends tend to converse in French, however they almost all also speak English as well and so it is difficult for me to improve my French. Greek is the language used amongst the servants. We dress in the European style. Such Frankish dress is also common amongst the Greeks and Armenians, however many of the older European ladies wear a Greek costume. Mrs. vL., my mother in law, tends to wear Greek clothes.?
      During the following ten years Henry John did missionary work from Constantinople and taught at a seminary in that town. During visits to Syria and Palestine he gathered material for a subsequent publication :?Bible Lands, Their
      Modern Customs and Manners Illustrative of Scripture? (1875). In 1849 he was again in the United States, where he married for the third time, Emily Ann Bird. Four years after the wedding he was transferred from Constantinople to Tokat, a tiny town located along the foothills of the mountains flanking the northwestern part of central Anatolia. There he was to open a missionary post and theological seminary. During his various trips around Tokat he made detailed notes concerning the various archaeological sites he came across which he later published in two volumes as Travels in Little-Known Parts of Asia Minor (1870). He himself made the illustrations for this publication. In November 1858 he was visited by the German Orientalist, Mordtmann, who described Henry John as "one of the very few erudite missionaries in this part of the world who have a solid knowledge of both the country and its languages. He is not only a linguist, but also a painter, musicologist, hunter and botanist, in short a universal genius."
      His rather unconventional behaviour caused jealousy amongst his colleagues, some of whom in fact tried to have him removed from his post. Fortunately Henry John managed to forestall this attempt.
      In 1861 the couple left Tokat. After a short stay in the United States they returned to Smyrna to teach there for six years. By then the problems with his eyesight and furthermore disagreement concerning missionary policy made him decide to return to the United States to settle there permanently.
      In the U.S. he taught natural sciences, Greek and modern languages at Ingham University in LeRoy, New York for three years, after which he moved to Great Barrington, Mass., where he became director and owner of the Sedgwick School for Boys.
      Besides the two publications already mentioned he also published Oriental Album (1862) and Ten days amongst Greek Bandits (1868).
      Sources: Dictionary of American Biography, Vol. X, edited by Duncan Malone, (New York 1964);
      J. Schmidt, From Anatolia to Indonesia, Opium Trade and the Dutch Community of Izmir, 1820 - 1940, (Istanbul 1998);
      Memoir of Mrs. Mary E. Van Lennep: only daughter of the Rev. Joel Hawes and wife of the Rev. Henry J. Van Lennep, missionary in Turkey / by her mother (Hartford 1850), reprint The University of Michigan.


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