Tsaar Peter I "de grote"  Romanoff

Tsaar Peter I "de grote" Romanoff

Male 1672 - 1725  (52 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and more than 100 descendants in this family tree.

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  • Name Peter I "de grote" Romanoff 
    Prefix Tsaar 
    Nickname de grote 
    Relationshipwith Adam
    Born 9 Jun 1672  Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 8 Feb 1725  St Petersburg Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10742  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2009 

    Father Tsaar Alexei Romanoff,   b. 20 Mar 1629, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Feb 1676, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years) 
    Mother Natalia Narishkine,   b. 1 Sep 1651,   d. 4 Feb 1694, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Married 1 Feb 1671  Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 2 siblings 
    Family ID F4062  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Eudoxia Lapoetchina,   b. 9 Aug 1669, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 1731, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 1689 
    Divorced 1698 
    Children 
     1. Alexej Petrowitsch Romanoff,   b. 18 Feb 1690,   d. 26 Jun 1718  (Age 28 years)
     2. Alexander Petrovich Romanoff,   b. 13 Oct 1691,   d. 14 May 1692  (Age 0 years)
     3. Paul Petrovich Romanoff,   b. 1693,   d. 1693  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2009 
    Family ID F3956  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Ekaterina I,   b. 24 Feb 1684, Dorpat, Esthonia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1727, St Petersburg Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years) 
    Married 1 Mar 1712  Warsaw Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Pavel Romanoff,   b. 1704,   d. 1707  (Age 3 years)
     2. Peter Romanoff,   b. 1705,   d. 1707  (Age 2 years)
     3. Catherine Romanoff,   b. 7 Feb 1707,   d. 1708  (Age 0 years)
     4. Anna Petrowna Romanoff,   b. 7 Feb 1708, Moskva, Moskva, Russia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1728, Kiel, DE Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     5. Tsarin Elizabeth Petrovna Romanoff,   b. 18 Dec 1709,   d. 25 Dec 1762  (Age 53 years)
     6. Peter Romanoff,   b. 1715,   d. 1719  (Age 4 years)
     7. Maria Romanoff,   b. 20 Mar 1713,   d. 27 May 1715  (Age 2 years)
     8. Margarita Romanoff,   b. 19 Sep 1714,   d. 7 Jun 1715  (Age 0 years)
     9. Peter Romanoff,   b. 15 Nov 1715,   d. 19 Apr 1719  (Age 3 years)
     10. Pavel Romanoff,   b. 13 Jan 1717,   d. 14 Jan 1717  (Age 0 years)
     11. Natalia Romanoff,   b. 31 Aug 1718,   d. 15 Mar 1725  (Age 6 years)
     12. NN Romanoff,   b. 1720,   d. 1720  (Age 0 years)
     13. Peter Romanoff,   b. 7 Oct 1723,   d. 7 Oct 1723  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 16 Sep 2009 
    Family ID F3010  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 9 Jun 1672 - Moskva, Moskva, Russia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    10742.jpg
    10742.jpg

  • Notes 
    • First Russian emperor (from 1721), was an unusually powerful and prepossessing ruler; his military achievements and westernizing reforms of the Russian government, army, and society laid the foundation of the modern Russian state. The youngest son of Tsar Alexis by a second marriage, Peter was not expected to rule and so avoided the customary ritual and secluded upbringing of the royal family. He associated with and learned from foreigners, especially Dutch, in the foreign quarter of Moscow where European merchants and representatives resided. After Alexis's death (1676) Fyodor III, Peter's half brother, became tsar. Fyodor died in 1682, however, and Peter became co-tsar with his half brother Ivan V, under the regency of his half sister, Sophia. Peter gained effective control of the government in 1689 in a plot engineered by his mother, Natalya Naryskin. And he also arrested her half sister (Sophia) in convent. During the early years of his rule Peter learned the arts of war and sailing in skirmishes (1695, 1696) against the Turks at Azov on the Black Sea. After becoming sole tsar on Ivan's death (1696), he traveled (1697-98) to Europe (Brandenburg, Dutch, Britain, Austria) -- the first journey of its kind for a Russian ruler-to examine the latest technical advances and to recruit engineering and military experts for his service. Peter began his reign in earnest in 1700, when he joined a European alliance that initiated the Great Northern war (1700-21) against Sweden. He hoped to annex territories along the Baltic coast and thereby open warm-water ports to give Russia a "window to the west." Charles XII of Sweden defeated Peter at the Baltic city of Narva in 1700, but he didn't give up and tried to defeat Charles Sweden army many times, and finally he defeated Sweden army in Pultava (1709) in the Ukraine. Pultava was the scene of a great Russian victory, and the Peace of Nystadt, signed in 1721, gave Russia its new Baltic coastline and proclaimed Peter as emperor of all the Russians. The Great Northern War required Peter to reorganize his empire in order to prepare it for a major European conflict. He needed troops for his army, necessitating a census and a system of conscription, which in turn required experts to train and arm the new soldiers. Peter needed artillery, which meant mines to be explored, transport to be arranged, and forges to be built and run by Western experts. He needed a fleet for the Baltic and the Black seas, which required special training for Muscovites who had not sailed before. The resources of Russian society had to be harnessed to the state's military effort. The nobles, previously uneducated and attached to their distant lands, were required to attend schools and to devote their lives to civil or military service. The Guards Regiments, aristocratic units that were the core of Peter's army, became especially powerful. Peter also coerced the Russian Orthodox church into service to the state, refusing to replace the patriarch in 1701, making the church a part of government administration through the creation of a Holy Synod controlled by the tsar, and organizing the huge material resources of the church for the government's use. Peter's heavy emphasis on military and technical development also accelerated the commercial life of Russia, especially through its new Baltic ports, and hastened the growth of manufacturing through state-created and -supervised companies. Peter disbanded Strelts from army (killed them all). Strelts were like Janizarys for Ottoman Army (captured children from other cities/states for state's army). Strelts were fanatic troops and they were against every new plans/changes in politic and they usually murdered every reformist nobles (and Tsars). Peter's desire to strengthen Russia also speeded the trend toward the secularization and modernization of culture. Peter built a new city and capital, St. Petersburg, on the Baltic lands taken from Sweden. He intended the city to be a symbol of the new Russia, free of outmoded traditions. Peter promoted secular education, prohibited men under 30 from becoming monks, encouraged Western dress, modernized the calendar and alphabet, and edited the first Russian newspaper. Peter's attempt to arrange the succession to the throne, however, met with difficulties. After his death his second wife ruled, ineffectually, as Catherine I and was followed by his sickly grandson Peter II (r. 1727-30). After Peter the succession was determined by a series of coups d'etat.


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