John Nance Garner, IV

John Nance Garner, IV

Male 1868 - 1967  (98 years)    Has more than 100 ancestors and 5 descendants in this family tree.

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All

  • Name John Nance Garner  [1, 2, 3
    Suffix IV 
    Relationshipwith Francis Fox
    Born 22 Nov 1868  near Detroit, Red River Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 Nov 1967  Uvalde, Uvalde Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Person ID I100929  Geneagraphie
    Last Modified 25 Oct 2014 

    Father John Nance Garner, III,   b. 1845, Rutherford Co, TN (prob) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Oct 1919, Detroit, Red River Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Sarah Jane Guest,   b. 30 May 1851, Detroit, Red River Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Sep 1932, Red River Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 3 May 1866  Red River Co, TX Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Siblings 6 siblings 
    Family ID F40453  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mariette Elizabeth "Ettie" Rheiner,   b. Abt 1872,   d. 1948  (Age ~ 76 years) 
    Married 25 Nov 1895  [3
    Children 
     1. Tully Garner,   b. 24 Sep 1896,   d. Abt 1967  (Age 70 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2000 
    Family ID F40458  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • - Vice President of the United States, 1932-40.

      - Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, 1931, Congressman 1903-1933.

      - Known as "Cactus Jack". Vigorously opposed organized Labor.

      - Read law in Clarksville, TX, & began practicing in Uvalde in 1890.

      - Acquired the Uvalde Leader in lieu of a legal fee.

      - Reputation as newspaper editor led to app't & election as county judge in Uvalde

      - Two terms in the Texas House of Representatives.

      - One of only two men in US history to serve as both Vice President & Speaker.

      - Expert at backstage maneuvering to get legislation passed.

      - Applied persuasion & good whiskey, which he called "striking a blow for liberty"

      - Favorite son presidential candidate of Texas, supported FDR .

      - Accepted VP nomination reluctantly. Not comfortable with the "New Deal."

      - Broke with FDR over the latter's plan to pack the Supreme Court.

      REF: George Wolfskill, University of Texas at Arlington: John Nance Garner, (1868-1967), American political leader, who was elected VICE PRESIDENT after serving 30 years in the U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. Born near Detroit, Texas, on Nov. 22, 1868, Garner read law in Clarksville, Texas, and began practice in Uvalde, Texas, in 1890. He acquired the Uvalde Leader in lieu of a legal fee and his reputation as a newspaper editor led to his appointment and reelection as county judge of Uvalde county. After two terms in the Texas House of Representatives, Garner moved to the U.S. House in 1903, serving until 1933. In 1931 he was elected Speaker. "Cactus Jack," as his friends called him, was an expert at backstage maneuvering to get legislation passed. He often invited colleagues to his office where he applied persuasion and good whiskey, a technique he called "striking a blow for liberty." Garner, the favorite son presidential candidate of Texas, made possible the nomination of Franklin D. ROOSEVELT in 1932 by releasing his Texas and California delegates. Garner then accepted the vice presidential nomination reluctantly. Though elected vice president with Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936, Garner was never comfortable in the NEW DEAL, which he regarded as too liberal. He finally broke with Roosevelt over the latter's plan to "pack" the Supreme Court in 1937. In 1940, Garner ran unsuccessfully against Roosevelt for the presidential nomination. Garner might have been a serious presidential candidate had he not been so vigorously opposed by representatives of organized labor. Labor leader John L. Lewis once characterized Garner as "a labor-baiting, poker-playing, whiskey-drinking, evil old man." When he left Washington in 1941, Garner retired to Uvalde. He made and kept a vow never to go east of the Potomac River again. He died in Uvalde on Nov. 7, 1967.

      REF: "Garners of Texas A Personal History" by Bascom N. Timmons, Harper & Bros. Publishers, New York, avail. at San Augustine (TX?) Public Library & Houston, Harris Co, TX library: John Nance Garner was only one of two men (the other being President U.S. Grant's Vice President Schuyler Colfax) to serve as both Speaker of the House & as Vice President.

  • Sources 
    1. [S750] Jackson, Ronald Vernon, (R.G. & Associates, certified genealogists ,).

    2. [S218] Garners of Texas: A Personal History, Bascon N. Timmons, (Harper & Bros. Publishers, New York , , Repository: Houston, Harris Co, TX Public Library).

    3. [S220] Descendants of John Nance Garner II & Rebecca Walpole Garner, John Denison, (Rt 1, Box 90, Bogata, TX 75417, on display at John Nance Garner Museum, Uvalde, TX, sent to J.H. Garner by Lera Powell , , Repository: Denison's phone: 903/632-4964).


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