Facsimiles of three pages

from the memoirs of Carlo Bonaparte, 
MS from the Archives Napoleon,

now in Archives Nationales 
(400 AP. 115 ).


Raggionamento Istorico, o siano memorie domestiche della famiglia di Buonaparle di

Ajaccio in Corsica scritte da me Carlo di Buonaparte quondam Giuseppe l'anno mille e settecento ottanta


Historical relation or

domestic memoirs of the

family Buonaparte of

Ajaccio in Corsica written by me Carlo di Buonaparte son of the late Giuseppe in the year seventeen eighty


Until the age of twelve I was educated by the Jesuits who existed tin Ajaccio] at that time,
and I showed a marked inclination to poetry. One can read in the margin some sonnets and songs mostly dedicated to the God of love who inflames incautious young people when they are not armed against his false seductions. (Not included)
My first amorous passion was for a Forcioli, and though she was without breeding or beauty and of a corresponding age none the less my heart knew no other flame than for her, and without the strong hand of my uncles, who saw with the eyes of reason, I would have flung myself into a marriage that would later have brought me unhappiness and handicapped the fortune of our family.
This should be a good lesson for my descendants, who should never allow themselves to be led by blind passion, but take the advice of those who see with impartial eyes; something very difficult to put into practice, because as the poet says: "If love knows reason it promptly disappears.

After various disputes

and incidents inseparable

from thwarted love,

I finally submitted to reason

and agreed to take for

my wife Letizia Ramolino, a young girl of real beauty

and irreproachable

morals,

and this happened on

3 June 1764, about a

year after my father's death . . . 

The said marriage contracted and consummated after some months I departed to Rome for the purpose of studying law, and I left my wife pregnant with a daughter who died

I stayed in Rome the space of about two years, after which, inflamed with love of my country which was then struggling to throw off  the yoke of the Genoese, and learning of the foundation of a university in Corte, I made the decision to return. It was then that I met Signor Pasquale de Paoli, General of the kingdom of Corsica, who received me with such kindness that I made up my mind to pursue my studies in the capital which at that period was flourishing in the arts of arms and of letters . . .