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171801 William died in 1596 leaving 10 pounds to his cousin Robert Carpenter
of Marden and other monies to the Rev. Stephen Bachiler, Minister of Wherwell
who was to be his executor. 
Spencer, William (I176484)
 
171802 William died Young Downing, William (I318865)
 
171803 William died young. Downing, William (I318888)
 
171804 William Edwin my Great Grandfather, Born 10th of December 1864 at 4 Eglington Road, Bow, Middx, he was a wellkown Victorian/Edwardian painter, he studied at Antwerp, and was lover to Louise Van Tongelen, It is believed that she got pregnant, then his father James Norris said that he should get married as soon as possible. They were married at St Mary's Church Staines Middx in October 1888. William Edwin was very talented, he got commissions to paint the Lord Mayors of London, which is every year, he has had his worked displayed in the Royal Academy, and Suffolk Street galleries, He represented Great Britain in the 1980 & 1912 Olympic Games, for smallbore rifle shooting, he won Silver in 1908, and Gold in 1912 London. During the WW1 he was sent to the front lines to sketch out the German Lines on the Western Front, he lived in Alfriston Sussex, between the wars, and then he moved to Miami, Florida to live with his daughter 'Mieka', he died in 1952. One of his paintintings is in the Royal Cornwall Musuem and it is titled Hornblower


With regard to the artist 'William Edwin Pimm' we have in our collections an oil painting of George Davis Hornblower. This item was received by the Royal Institution of Cornwall in July 1948 as a gift from G. D. Hornblower himself. The painting is a head and shoulders portrait of the subject in oil. The canvas is signed by the artist 'William Pimm 1895' [i.e. July 1895] and is in a gilt frame 270 x 375 mm.

Hornblower (1864-1951) was at some time an official in the Egyptian Ministry of the Interior. It was during this period of his life that he became interested in Egyptology. He was also interested in Anthropology. He was the author of a number of articles including 'Funerary Designs on Predynastic Jars' and 'Foundations of Ancient Egyptian Religion.' Another article he had printed in Old Cornwall 1942 was 'The Religious Base of our Megaliths.' During the Second World War he resided at the Mounts Bay Hotel in Penzance, Cornwall. Over a period of many years he donated many objects (mainly Egyptian) to the museum of the Royal Institution of Cornwall (i.e.The Royal Cornwall Museum, Truro). These items included amulets, tools, games, weights, pottery, figures of animals, gods and goddesses etc.

We would certainly be interested in any information that you could supply about William Edwin Pimm. Although we have the portrait we know very little about this artist.

If I can help further please let me know.

Sincerely yours
Angela Broome, Librarian
The Courtney Library
Royal Institution of Cornwall
River Street
Truro TR1 2SJ
Cornwall

From: enquiry
To: Angela Broome

Although we collect reproductions of portraits by British artists, unfortunately William Edwin Pimm is not represented in our files. I have
checked the lists of works he exhibited at the Royal Academy and the Royal Society of British Artists (Suffolk Street), which also give us the
addresses he exhibited from:

Royal Academy:
1890 'The Convent Garden' from 2 The Mall, Park Road, London NW
1894 'Convalescent' from Vale of Health Studios, Hampstead Heath, London

Royal Society of British Artists (all from Vale of Health Studios):
1891 'On the Watch'
1891/2 'Kittens at Play' (pastel)
1892 'Kittens chasing a Fly'
1892/3 'Collaborateurs'

As he seems to have been largely an artist of animals and genre scenes, I think you would have more luck at a less specialised art library - I suggest you visit the Witt Library at the Courtauld Institute who do have a small file of his work. I'm sorry I could not be of more help.

Erika Ingham
Heinz Archive and Library
National Portrait Gallery
St Martin's Place
London WC2H 0HE tel 020 7306 0055 ext 248 fax 020 7306 0056 
Pimm, William Edwin (I369831)
 
171805 William farmed in the New Oregon area for several years. He then became a rural mail carrier in the Cresco area. In the first years, he traveled by horse and buggy or sleigh. His first car was a Metz, which had a chain drive, large brass kerosene headlights, and leather doors which snapped into place. In the horse and buggy days, his wife Elizabeth was his substitute carrier during the summer. His obituary in the 6-10-1953 Times-Plain Dealer stated he died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. W. Nichols, in Oakland, CA. He was the son of Riley and Harriet Mitchell. He took writing and drawing lessons from a teacher in Cresco. He was survived by his children, Fred W. Mitchell and Mrs. W. W. Nichols of Oakland, 7 grandchildren, and 19 great-grandchildren. Services were held at the Cresco Methodist Church. Mitchell, William Riley (I253332)
 
171806 William FitzAdelm de Burgh, William (I113408)
 
171807 William Fowler emigrated from Hertfordshire, England to Boston in June 26 1637 with Reverend John Davenport. He moved to New Haven, Connecticut, then called Quinnipac, in 30 March, 1638 and later moved to Milford in 1639.

From the New England Historical & Genealogical Register Vol. 11 page 248

William Fowler came over in the company of Rev. John Davenport, Governor. Eaton and others, and arrived at Boston 26 June 1637. William Fowler is mentioned as a prisoner in Bridewell with other Puritans in the year 1592. The list of poisoners is immediately preceded by a petition addressed to the Lord Treasurer by many of the "poor Cristiains impresoned by the Bishops in sundry prisons in and about London." About this time a congregation of Puritans were discovered at Islington, which was then and now is a part of London in fact. He was an old man when he settled in Milford, having died sixty-eight years after, and if he was, say, twenty at imprisonment, this would make him 88. There is therefore nothing improbable in the supposition that the prisoner was the William Fowler that came to New Haven. If so, he was probably from Islington, or near London. In this connection we introduce the following from " Weever's Funeral Monuments," of " Monumental remains at Islington near London." -- "Here ---- John Fowler -- 1538," and "Alis Fowler, wife of Robert Fowler, Esquire, who d. ---- , 1540;" "Divers of the family lie here interred; the ancestors of Sir Thomas Fowler, Knight and Baronet, living 1630." Mr. Davenport was born in Warwickshire, and removed to London, where he was vicar of St. Stephen's Church, Mr. Eaton, another of the New Haven company, was a member of this Church, and also from Warwickshire -- the ancestors of both being originally from the County of Chester. Mr. Fowler sailed with this company from Boston, and arrived at New Haven in April, 1638, and was at the famous meeting in Mr. Newman's barn, 4 June, 1639, when the peculiar constitution and policy of Mr. Davenport, which afterwards characterized the New Haven Colony, was agreed upon. Mr. Fowler subscribed to that agreement. In the spring of 1639, the settlement of Milford had been arranged, and Mr. Fowler is the first named of the trustees, and the only one bearing the honorable prefix of Mr." At the first meeting of the Milford Company he was chosen one of the "Judges." The church was organized 1639, and he was elected one of the "seven pillars," -- Mr. Peter Prudden, Pastor. Mr. Fowler was elected magistrate, and reappointed yearly to 1654. In 1640, by agreement with the town, he built a mill, the first erected in New Haven Colony, and which is now in possession of his descendants. It is probable that Mr. Fowler was one among those of the first settlers who had received a classical education in his native country. His name is in the roll of planters at New Haven, 1642, as having an &800 estate, and a family of three persons. He d. 25 Jan 1660-1, and his will was presented by his son William to the General Court of the Colony 1661, but was not recorded, and being unfortunately lost, we are without guide as to his family. His children were born before his removal to America, he at the time of his settlement being an old man, and "his family of three" were doubtless himself, wife and one child. The child may have been Mary who married John Caffing. There is nothing inconsistent in this supposition and tradition that Ambrose of Wia(n?)dsor, and John, who settled in Guilford, were brothers of William Fowler, Jr., (who settled at Milford,) and sons of Mr. William Fowler the magistrate. 
Fowler, William (I436022)
 
171808 William Frederick Bentinck-Smith (1871-1924), m.1913 Marion Jordan (1879-1943)
1.2.4.1.4.1.)

1.2.4.1.4.2.)

1.2.4.1.4.3.)

1.2.4.1.4.4 
Bentinck-Smith, William Frederick (I446064)
 
171809 William Gildersleeve, Volume 6, Sheet 8, Enumerator District 143, lin e37, Carroll County, Bogard Village, Van Horn Township, Enumerator Distric t 23, 1880 Missouri Census. Death Certificate. Newspaper Obituary, Colfax, Washington. Hooper Precinct, Whitman County, Washington, Federal Census, 15 Jun e 1900. Civil War Registers and Sketches. He served in New York 194th Infantry Regiment, Company K, from 23 Feb ruary 1865 to 3 May 1865 at age 15 - he listed his age as 17. 1890 Whitman County Washington Veterans and Widows Census: Gildersle eve, William, Pampa, Pvt, 23rd NY Regiment, enlist date 1862, discharge da te Aug 1864. He was a farmer/stockraiser in Washington. Came to Colfax in 1882. Pamnpa And Its Neighbors, Ethel Gordon Metzger, page 109: Mr. and M rs. W. A. Gildersleeve came to Colfax in 1883. They were originally from New Y ork State but lived in Missouri for a while before coming west. The family soo n moved to Pampa where the father and George and Frank in their time homesteade d between Lacrosse and Pampa. Very shortly the W. A. Gildersleeves moved to Li ttle Palouse Falls where they had livestock and hay. There were also tw o daughters, Myrtle and Mabel. George married Carrie Bowman and they lived on his homestead for a wh ile. On December 12, 1908, they were able to patent the homestead and sold i t that very day to J. E. and F. L. Gordon. This land now belongs to the Schweiger Brothers. Carrie and George moved to Rattlesnake Flats in Adams County where th eir three oldest children were born. They were Irma, Jean and Walter. When the elder Gildersleeves moved into Washtucna, George and his fam ily moved to their place and this was where Delbert was born. The children attended Palouse Falls School and later graduated from W ashtucna High School. Delbert graduated from North Central High in Spokane. George also was a cattle buyer and had a butcher shop in Washtucna . They later lived in Payette, Idaho, and in Spokane before returning to the Palou se Falls Ranch after George Gildersleeve's death in 1926. Delbert lived at th e ranch with his mother until Delbert and Bernadine were married in 1936. Ca rrie moved to Los Angeles where she lived until her death. Walter, in the meantime, was an oil distributor in Baker, Oregon. Th e ranch was operated as Gildersleeve Brothers from 1926 to 1943 when it was s old to Ira Scott. Delbert and Bernadine moved to Baker and went into business. Frank Gildersleeve became a stockman and had a butcher shop in Lacros se. He married Pearl Dell Wilson and their two children were Edgar and Viole t. The family moved to Enterprise, Oregon, and stayed there from 1914-18. T hey then returned to Lacrosse to run the butcher shop for two years. About this time Frank, George, and Harry Kelly formed a partnership i n a large livestock operation in Enterprise. They ran one thousand cattle an d five thousand sheep. In 1921 Frank took a carload of lambs to Omaha. The prices were so l ow there that he took them on to Chicago, where the price was no better. Th e sale of the lambs did not pay for the freight. Frank's wife died in 1921. Frank died there in 1949, Edgar was kille d in an auto accident in 1959. Violet is Mrs. William (Butch) Moffitt in Ent erprise. She is the only survivor of W. A. Gildersleeve's grandchildren, but t hey all left surviving children. Whitman County Deeds, County Court House, Colfax, Washington: Direct Deeds 18 Aug 1903; W. A. Gildersleeve w/wife Mary E. to Adams County Elec T ranst Co; book 113; page 425; warrenty deed, tract W 6,14,37. Indirect Deeds 18 Feb 1886; John F. Whealen to Wm A. Gildersleeve; book N; page 254 ; warrenty deed. 18 Feb 1886; United States to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; book O; page 96; r eceipt. 12 Nov 1897; United States to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; book 5; page 488 ; patent. 20 Feb 1900; United States to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; boo 6; page 156; p atent. 26 Jan 1900; Northern Pacific RR to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; book 94; pag e 544; warrenty deed. 6 Dec 1907; A. J. Logsdon & wife to Wm. A. Gildersleeve & Co.; book 1 38; page 507; agreement. 6 Dec 1907; A. J. Logsdon & wife to Wm. A. Gildersleeve & Co.; book 1 38; page 508; lease. 6 Dec 1907; A. J. Logsdon & wife to Wm. A. Gildersleeve & Co.; book 1 38; page 509; warrenty deed, Lacross. 27 Apr 1911; N Coast RR Co. to Wm. A. Gildersleeve & wife Mary E.; bo ok 161; page 72; deed strips of land across lots 1,2,3,4 6,14,37. 1 Jul 1911, United States to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; book 8; page 607; c ertified copy patent, lots 1 & 2 6,14,37. 28 Aug 1913; Spokane Merchants Assoc to Wm. A. Gildersleeve; book 170 ; page 378; 5W Deed, Lamont. June 7, 1934; 1:40; USA to Gildersleeve, William A.; Patent vol. 50 D eeds 603, Lots 1-2 6,14,37. Adams County Deeds, County Courthouse, Ritzville, Washington: Direct Deeds Aug 10, 1903; 8:15; Gildersleeve, W. A. to Adams Co. Electric T. Co. ; warrenty deed; Vol. 8; page 6; Right of way, sec 6, twp 14, range 37. Gildersleeve, William Alyn (I219823)
 
171810 William Goodrick the eldest son, baptized 18th April 1742, purchased properties in 1772 in the city of Durham, where he resided. He was a keen sportsman, and a regular guest, during the hunting season, at Bramham Park, then one of the residences of his kinsman, Sir John Goodricke. He married, 22nd February, 1766, Elizabeth, daughter of John Richardson, Esq., of Durham, and died in September 1778, at the early age of 36, leaving issue-
1William, born 29th October 1769.
2John Hutchinson baptized 9th October 1774. His wife's name was Elizabeth, but he died s.p. in 1803.
3Thomas, born 14th December, 1776, died 8th March, 1859, leaving by his wife, Jane, daughter of - Carpenter, Esq., who died May 1873, an only son, John Richardson Goodricke, born 5th March, 1816. 
Goodricke, William (I269141)
 
171811 William Goodricke born 1662, was also an officer in the army. He married Jane, daughter of Mr, Gibson, of the city of Durham, and died at Montpelier in France, leaving three children-infants 1. Henry. 2. John. 3. Jane.
Henry, the eldest, died unmarried. 
Goodricke, William (I269126)
 
171812 William Greer was the first son of John and Sarah Greer and was born
in 1707 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Sometime about 1737 William
Greer and his wife Anne Fitch, the daughter of William and Sarah Fitch
, settled in Anne Arundell County, Maryland and then moved to that
part of Bedford County which later became Franklin County, Virginia
.There he was Captain of the militia, justice, and member of the
Legislature. They had eight sons, William, James, Shadrack and John,
Aquilla (or Acquilla), Walter, Benjamin and Moses. There was also a
daughter Rebbeca.
When the Revolutionary War broke out the four youngest of the sons
took part with the Army of the Revolution. The four eldest either
remain neutral or took part with the Tories. Especially is Shadrack
supposed to have joined the British Army. For this his younger
brothers are said to have disowned him.
There is said to be some evidence that William Greer was born in
Ireland, however, other researchers have co-mingled the children of
John Greer and William as they have similar names. Family records
start with William's son Moses, born June 2, 1744 in Anne Arundel
County, Maryland. The Sons of the Revolution office at Knoxville and
Balitimore County Families, 1659 -1759 both
provide data that William was the son of John and Sarah Greer. The
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, Maryland library contains census and
Revolutionary War pension records for Moses, Senior. The names and
dates of birth also support this research. 
Greer, William (I314774)
 
171813 William H. Oliphant (Rev) preached the funeral of Solomon Morgan at Union, Ind. on 16 Oct, 1886.He was 70 Yrs old at that time.
Info is rrecorded in the deaths from the Harrodsburg Review Historical Soc. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Oliphant, William H (I312483)
 
171814 William had a military summons to attend the King at Chester, 42nd of Henry III, in order to restrain the hostilities of the Welsh. He married Mary, the eldest daughter and co-heir of Roger de Merlay, an eminent baron of the north, by whom he acquired the manor of Morpeth in Northumberland.
This William de Greystoke was descended from Lyulph, and succeeded his brother in 1254. He and his wife, in 1281, devised to their burgesses of Morpeth all their ground on the north side of Marpeth, within the boundaries in their charter. William died May 9, 16th of Edward I, 1288/9, possessed of the manors of Crestwaite, in York; Duftin in Westmoreland; Greystoke and lands in Newbigging and Blencow in Cumberland; and of the manor of Morpeth, half of Stannington and Hepscott, the ville and church of Horseley and divers other lands.
They had Thomas, 1st son, called 1st Lord Greystoke, who was summoned to Parliament 30 Sept., 11th of Edward II, and died sine prole, and was succeeded by his brother John, 2nd Lord Greystoke, who was in the wars of Edward II, died sine prole, and settled the estates on his brother Ralph. John died in 1316 and was succeeded by his brother, Ralph the 3rd son of William and Mary. 
de Greystoke, William (I422163)
 
171815 William had been sent to England earlier, at the age of five, with a short stopover at St. Helena where the prisoner Napoleon was pointed out to him. He was educated at schools in Southampton and Chiswick and then at Charterhouse School , where he was a close friend of John Leech . He disliked Charterhouse, parodying it in his later fiction as "Slaughterhouse." He then studied at Trinity College, Cambridge , but was never too keen on academic studies and left the University in 1830.
He travelled for some time on the continent, visiting Paris and Weimar , where he met Goethe . He returned to England and began to study law at the Middle Temple , but soon gave that up. On reaching twenty-one, he came into his inheritance, but he squandered much of it on gambling and by funding two unsuccessful newspapers, The National Standard and The Constitutional, which he had hoped to write for. He also lost a good part of his fortune in the collapse of two Indian banks. Forced to consider a profession to support himself, he turned first to art, which he studied in Paris, but he did not pursue it, except in later years as the illustrator of some of his own novels and other writings.
Thackeray's years of semi-idleness ended after he met and, in 1836, married Isabella Shawe, who bore him three daughters, two of whom survived. He now began "writing for his life," as he put it, turning to journalism in an effort to support his young family.
He primarily worked for Fraser's Magazine , a sharp-witted and sharp-tongued conservative publication, for which he produced art criticism, short fictional sketches, and two longer fictional works, Catherine and The Luck of Barry Lyndon . Later, through his connection to the illustrator John Leech, he began writing for the newly created Punch magazine, where he published The Snob Papers, later collected as The Book of Snobs . This work popularized the modern meaning of the word "snob."
Meanwhile tragedy struck in his personal life as his wife succumbed to depression after the birth of their third child. She attempted suicide and eventually lapsed into a permanent state of a detachment from reality. Thackeray desperately sought cures for her, but nothing worked, and she ended up confined in a home, where she remained until 1893, outliving her husband by thirty years. After his wife's illness, Thackeray became a virtual bachelor, pursuing other women such as Mrs. Jane Brookfield, but never establishing another permanent relationship.
In the early 1840's, Thackeray had some success with two travel books, The Paris Sketch Book and The Irish Sketch Book . Later in the decade he achieved some notoriety with his Snob Papers, but the work that really established his fame was the novel Vanity Fair , which first appeared in serialized installments beginning in January 1847. Even before Vanity Fair completed its serial run, Thackeray had become a celebrity, sought after by the very lords and ladies he satirized and hailed as the equal of Dickens .
He remained "at the top of the tree," as he put it, for the remaining decade and a half of his life, producing several large novels, notably Pendennis , The Newcomes , and The History of Henry Esmond , despite various illnesses, including a near fatal one that struck him in 1849 in the middle of writing Pendennis. He twice visited the United States on lecture tours during this period, and there fell in love with the young American girl, Sally Baxter.
Thackeray also gave lectures in London, on the English humourists of the eighteenth century, and on the first four Hanoverian monarchs, the latter series being published in book form as The Four Georges . He also stood unsuccessfully as an independent for Parliament.
In 1860 Thackeray became editor of the newly established Cornhill Magazine , but was never comfortable as an editor, preferring to contribute to the magazine as a columnist, producing his Roundabout Papers for it.
Ill for much of his later years and feeling he had lost much of his creative impetus, Thackeray died of a stroke in 1863. His funeral was attended by as many as seven thousand people. He was buried in Kensal Green Cemetery , and a memorial bust sculpted by Marochetti can be found in Westminster Abbey .
Works
Thackeray began as a satirist and parodist, with a sneaking fondness for roguish upstarts like Becky Sharp in Vanity Fair , Barry Lyndon in The Luck of Barry Lyndon , and Catherine in Catherine . In his earliest works, writing under such pseudonyms as Charles James Yellowplush, Michael Angelo Titmarsh, and George Savage Fitz-Boodle, he tended towards the savage in his attacks on high society, military prowess, the institution of marriage, and hypocrisy.
One of his very earliest works was "Timbuctoo," a satirical poem written for a Cambridge poetry contest won by Tennyson in 1829, but his writing career really began with a series of satirical sketches usually known now as The Yellowplush Papers, which appeared in Fraser's Magazine beginning in 1837.
Between May 1839 and February 1840, Fraser's published the work sometimes considered Thackeray's first novel, Catherine , originally intended as a satire of the Newgate school of crime fiction, but ending up more as a rollicking picaresque tale in its own right.
In The Luck of Barry Lyndon , a novel serialized in Fraser's in 1844, Thackeray explored the situation of an outsider trying to achieve status in high society, a theme he developed much more successfully in Vanity Fair in the character of Becky Sharp , the artist's daughter who rises nearly to the heights by manipulating the other characters.
He is best known now for Vanity Fair , with its deft skewerings of human foibles and its roguishly attractive heroine. His large novels from the period after Vanity Fair , once described unflatteringly by Henry James as examples of "loose baggy monsters," have faded from view, perhaps because they reflect a mellowing in the author, who became so successful with his satires on society that he seemed to lose his zest for attacking it.
The later works include Pendennis , a sort of bildungsroman depicting the coming of age of Arthur Pendennis, a sort of alter ego of Thackeray's who also features as the narrator of two later novels: The Newcomes and The Adventures of Philip . The Newcomes is noteworthy for its critical portrayal of the "marriage market," while Philip is noteworthy for its semi-autobiographical look back at Thackeray's early life, in which the author partially regains some of his early satirical zest.
Also notable among the later novels is The History of Henry Esmond , in which Thackeray attempted to write a novel in the style of the eighteenth century. In fact, the eighteenth century held a great appeal for Thackeray. Besides Esmond, Barry Lyndon and Catherine are set then, as is the sequel to Esmond, The Virginians , which takes place in America and includes George Washington as a character who nearly kills one of the protagonists in a duel.
Reputation
Thackeray is most often compared to one other great novelist of Victorian literature , Charles Dickens . During the Victorian era, he was ranked second only to Dickens, but he is now much less read and is known almost exclusively as the author of Vanity Fair . In that novel he was able to satirize whole swaths of humanity while retaining a light touch. It also features his most memorable character, the engagingly roguish Becky Sharp . As a result, unlike Thackeray's other novels, it remains popular with the general reading public, is a standard fixture in university courses, and has been repeatedly adapted for movies and television.
In Thackeray's own day, some commentators, such as Anthony Trollope ranked his History of Henry Esmond as his greatest work, perhaps because it expressed Victorian values of duty and earnestness, as did some of his other later novels. It is perhaps for this reason that they have not survived as well as Vanity Fair , which satirizes those values.
Thackeray saw himself as writing in the realistic tradition and distinguished himself from the exaggerations and sentimentality of Dickens . Some later commentators have accepted this self-evaluation and seen him as a realist, but others note his inclination to use eighteenth-century narrative techniques, such as digressions and talking to the reader, and argue that through them he frequently disrupts the illusion of reality. The school of Henry James , with its emphasis on maintaining that illusion, marked a break with Thackeray's techniques.
Trivia
One of Thackeray's daughters (Harriet, also known as Minnie) was the first wife of Sir Leslie Stephen , founding editor of the Dictionary of National Biography . With his second wife, Stephen was the father of Virginia Woolf , making Thackeray "almost" her grandfather. Thackeray's other daughter, Anne, remained close to the Stephen family after her sister's death; young Virginia referred to her as Aunt Anny and created a character based on her in her novel Night and Day . Al Murray ("the Pub Landlord") is a direct descendant.
[ edit ]

List of works
The Yellowplush Papers (1837)
Catherine (1839)
A Shabby Genteel Story ( 1840 )
The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon, Esq. ( 1844 ), filmed as Barry Lyndon by Stanley Kubrick
The Book of Snobs ( 1848 ), which popularised that term
Vanity Fair ( 1848 ), featuring Becky Sharp
Pendennis ( 1848 -1850)
Rebecca and Rowena ( 1850 ), a parody sequel of Ivanhoe
The History of Henry Esmond ( 1852 )
The Newcomes ( 1855 )
The Rose and the Ring ( 1855 )
The Virginians ( 1857 -1859)
The Adventures of Philip (1862)
Denis Duval (1864) 
Thackeray, William Makepeace (I186445)
 
171816 William had seven children only one name known. Meriwether, William (I244427)
 
171817 William Haliday Hollidaie, William (I1403384)
 
171818 WILLIAM HARDIE AND WILLIAM BARDIE MIGHT BE THE SAME PERSON OR MIGHT NOT . . . Hardie, William (I177018)
 
171819 William Hart Beeson decended from this line. Beeson, John (I312666)
 
171820 William Harvey Amyx was born April 21, 1856 in Hawkins Co. TN, and died Sept. 23, 1936 in Sanger, Texas, Denton Co. He married Orlena Trent, daughter of James Madison and Zana Seale Trent Oct. 31, 1878 in Hancock Co. TN. She was born Sept. 29, 1859 and died Sept. 16, 1913. Wm. Harvey was a Baptist, Mason, Farmer and a well respected citizen.

Wm. Harvey was the first of thirteen children born to Riley Samuel and Minerva Pearson Amyx. They had nine children while living in Hancock Co. TN. They moved to Denton Co. TX. in 1896 and settled on the Lock Forrester Ranch West of Bolivar. They lived there for nine years and that is where the remaining four children were born. Jack and Fannie died during this time.

Wm. Harvey moved his family to the Jim Holt place for six years. He purchased a farm Northeast of Sanger in 1911. In 1912 their old farm house burned to the ground, but all escaped unharmed. Wm. Harvey built a fine new home and in 1913 Orlene passed away. Her death was contributed to heart failure. In 1936 Wm Harvey passed away. Both are buried at Bolivar Baptist Church Cemetery, Bolivar, TX.

Following is a letter Wm. Harvey wrote to his daughter, my mother Myrtle Marie Amyx Rice:

Sanger, TX
Monday the 12, 1931

Mrs. W.C. Rice:

Dear Daughter:

In answer to your letter, Boss and I went to Slidell and saw the man from McKing. Evan Rice was not there. We looked over the place and it is a very good place. Had some small rocks on it in places. All in cultivation, lies well. Joins John Christian's farm on the northwest, and the old Ball place on the northeast. It has a few spots of Johnson grass on it. Good fence around it, 'bout two miles from Slidell.

Myrtle, if you and Bill want to trade for the place you come and look at it. You can come some night and go back the next day. You come to Slidell and go to the old Ball place. Allen Millegan lives on it and he can show it to you. I am well as common. All well, Zanie is washing, hasn't time to write.
W.H. Amyx




William Harvey had a will filed at the Denton County Courthouse. Orlene did not have a will. I would like to share this will with you. It is as follows:

The State of Texas, County of Denton. Know all men by these presents, that I W.H. Amyx, of Sanger, Denton County, State of Texas, being in sound and disposing mind and memory, and in reasonably good health, but getting up in years, and realizing full well that all men must sooner or later die, and desiring while yet living, to direct the disposition of whatever property I may die possessed of, hereby make, publish, and declare the following instrument as my LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT, hereby revoking all former wills heretofore made by me.
First, it is my desire that all the honest debts I may owe at my death, including the expense of my last sickness, and burial in a modest Christian way, and a suitable modest monument, in accord with my estate and station in life, erected at my grave.
Second, it is my desire, that the residue of my estate after the payment of my said debts be disposed of as follows, to wit: divided into ELEVEN equal shares or portions, one of said shares or portions to be delivered to each of my said ELEVEN children, or to their descendants, should any of my said children die before I do, and should any one of my said ELEVEN children die intestate and leave no surviving child or children, then in such event it is my desire that such share of said deceased child, revert back and be divided equally among my surviving children, or their descendants.
Second, in the event that at my death any of my children are indebted to me, then in such event it is my desire that the amount of such indebtedness owing to me by such child, be deducted from his or her share of my said estate.
Third, in the event that any of my children are indebted to me at my death, either by note or just an account not evidenced by writing, and in either event such indebtedness shall not be barred by any statute or limitation, as such indebtedness is an advancement made by me to such child or children to be charged against his or her share of my said estate.
Fourth, I hereby nominate my son J.S. Amyx, if living at my death, as my sole executor of this last Will and Testament, and reposing full faith and confidence in the ability and integrity of my said son J.S. Amyx, that he will faithfully carry out this trust, I hereby relieve him of giving any bond or security to any court or person for the faithful performance of this trust.
Fifth, It is not my intention in this will to dispose of the undivided One half interest in the community estate belonging to my deceased wife, Orlene Amyx, but to dispose of my one half interest in said community estate and my separate estate.
Sixth, it is my desire that no other or further action in regard to my said estate, be had or taken in the probate court or any other court, save and except to file this will and probate the same, and file the usual Statutory inventory, and list of property and claims. In Witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name at Sanger, Texas, and published and declared to above and foregoing as my last Will and Testament, This the 17th day of December, A.D., 1923.

W. H. Amyx

On this the 17th day of December, A.D. 1923, at Sanger, Texas, W.H. Amyx, in our presence, signed the above and foregoing writing, and published and declared the same as his last Will and Testament, and we at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereto written our names as subscribing witnesses. A. L. Gentle
T. L. Bumanghs?

I must share this little story Mother told me about Grandpa Amyx:
"Daddy was a young man and had come under conviction he was a sinner. He went out in the woods and got down on his knees and was really calling out loud to the Lord. He heard some hunters walking close by and jumped up, brushed off his clothes and acted nonchalant. As soon as they passed on, he got back down and prayed his salvation through." 
Amyx, William Harvey (I365662)
 
171821 William has a possibly got a brother called Thomas who was gassed in WW1
William was a Mineral Water Box maker. 
Ellison, William (I118241)
 
171822 William Henry Greer, born in Franklin County, Virginia, October 9,
1831. He married Mahalia Rebecca Huchison, she was born August 30,
1835 and died July 6, 1885. She was the daughter of John Hutchenson
and Nancy Billingsley and died on November 13, 1851. On his trips
from Grassy Cove to Pikeville to attend courts, William Greer would
often be invited to spend the night with some obliging citizen. It
happened several times that John Hutchenson invited him to spend the
night with him. There he met the young daughter and a romanced sprang
up and blossomed into a wedding. John Hutcheson was a early settler in
Bledsoe County. He married Nancy Billingsley, the daughter of John
Billingsley. They had four children and the youngest married William
Henry Greer.
William Henry Greer and Rebecca Mahala Hutchenson Greer began
Housekeeping in a small log house. They lived in this house until
buying a farm in Smyrna. After the close of the Civil War he bought
another farm. They lived there for one year and then bought a farm
across the river and moved to that location, After several years he
moved back across the river.There he lived until his death. Mahala
died in 1885 and William married the second time to Matilda Robertson
and then to Ven Pearson. He was a farmer and had no inclinations to
hold public office, though he was Sheriff of Bledsoe County at one
time. He was a faithful member of the Church of Christ.
William and Mahala had nine children John Weatherstun, Martha
Elizabeth, Mary Ann, Nancy Jane, Emily Catherine, Henry Clay, Louella,
Addie, and William Moses. Mahalia died July 6,1885 and William died
June 25, 1908. Both are buried at Wesley Cemetery, Pikeville. 
Greer, William Henry (I314761)
 
171823 William Hodelston Huddleston, William (I187285)
 
171824 William Huse de la Heuse, William (I114453)
 
171825 William inherited Dirleton from his kinsman Sir John, the Lord Advocate Nisbet, William (I704667)
 
171826 WILLIAM INMAN was probly a brother of the family of Abenego and
Shadrach Inman, two Revolutionary War solders, both born in England.
They came from England prior to The Revolution in 1776.The name of one
of William's sons was Shadrach. A will probated in Pittslyvania
County, Virginia June 20, 1803 states "I, William Inman, being weak
and sickly in body, but in perfect mind and memory to my beloved wife
Susannah Inman my whole estate during her lifetime and at her decease
the pursuant estate to be equally divided amongst my five children
Henry Inman, Nancy Inman, Edmund Inman, Shadreck Inman, Jesse Inman
and their heirs. My land to be sold and divided amongst all my
children William Inman (Jr.),Polly Morris, Sarah Morgin, Lydia Boac
and five children above mentioned. 
Inman, William (I314358)
 
171827 William is called Cecil. He and Ava were married by Judge
Handberry in Princ eton, Kentucky. Ava was an only child. 
Board, William Cecil (I324862)
 
171828 William is spoken of in a work published in 1637 and reprinted in "Historical
Collections of Massachusetts." 
Rathbone, William (I316788)
 
171829 William is the only son other than David (and possibly Adam) who is mentioned by 'The Scottish Antiquary' which is the sole source for the following Stewart, William (I713378)
 
171830 William Jefferson Blythe II was named for an uncle. Blythe, William Jefferson II (I73854)
 
171831 William Kensett was married at The Registrar Office at St Pancras London on th 18th of March 1911

150 Years in Islington
An address given by WILLIAM KENSETT STYLES on 16th April 1934
I have been asked to read a short paper on the history of our family at Islington, and I propose to take the lives of four men and one boy in turn, five consecutive generations The first one was John Styles, the second son William Jeyes Styles, the third his great grandson William Kensett Styles, and the fifth his great-great grandson William De Tongres Styles. All of whom lived in Islington at some time in their lives.

To begin with, John in the year 1773 at a remote hamlet in Suffolk called Thrandeston, but pronounced in that district 'Thrawnson', a young man named married a young woman named Mary Wharton. Things in Suffolk were pretty bad at that time, as generally seem to have been, and some friend told him that if he wanted to make his fortune he should set up for himself as a carpenter in a in a village which was to the North of London, some way out, called Islington, and which was growing because of the number of persons retired there, and who were having big houses built there, and who ultimately died and would require costly coffins. As John Styles was celebrated coffin maker this last fact appears to have appealed to him as much and accordingly, in the year 1783, John Styles and his wife Mary, accompanied by a little maid who refused to leave them, took their places in the carrier's cart after waiting on a convenient grassy patch (which still exists on the Norwich road) set forth for London.

Let us for moment, while they are travelling down the London road consider the affairs, politically at that time. Things were generally (except perhaps in Suffolk). We had just made peace with America, peace had been made between France and Spain and even while they were riding in the coach, a curious document was being drawn up, entitled 'The Definitive Treaty of "Peace and Friendship, between His Britannic, Majesty The most Christian King, signed at Versailles on the 3rd September 1763, which recited that the two George the Third by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick, and Luxembourg and Treasurer, and Elector of the Holy Roman etc., and the most Serene and most Potent Prince Lewis 16th, By the Grace of God the most Christian King, being mutually desirous of putting an end to the war, proceeded to do so. It is a curious document, because George, having called himself King of France, could not refer Louis as the King of France, but merely as 'the most Christian King', which apparently covered everything else he could possibly be.

John and Mary in due time, by slow degrees, arrived in Islington. and set up housekeeping in one of the small houses still standing In the courtyard opposite Tyndale Terrace, as it then was (now Tyndale between 191 & 192 Upper Street and this house the site of as authentic a ghost story as one can have It appears that., a few years after they settled there, one evening between 9.0 and 10.0 o'clock the having gone to bed early, as they did in those days, John Styles was awakened by a knocking or raping at the front door, and putting his head out of the window he saw that the person knocking was a woman dressed a bonnet and shawl, which all he, could make out in the dim light. As she took no notice of his questions as to who she was and what she wanted, and persisted in continuing to knock, he called to the 'Charlie' or watchman, whom he heard going by in the Upper street is to come and see what the woman wanted, and, as he the carrying his lantern coming up the little passage which anyone can see for themselves to this day is so narrow that you can touch it with your elbows as you walk up it), he went downstairs and unbolted the front door, to find, to his astonishment that there was nobody there. He asked the atchman to stand in the passage to anyone escaping, and borrowing his lantern went through the courtyard and the shed where he kept his ladders, paints and suchlike, but could find no one. Three or four days afterwards he learnt, by post, that his mother had come in from a walk, had sat down in her armchair still with her bonnet and shawl on, and had died (as is the fashion in our family. with some rapidity at or about the time when the figure had appeared rapping on his front door.

John and Mary soon found themselves surrounded with a family of small children, and it is curious, in these days of theatres, cinemas and suchlike, to look back and see how poor folk used to amuse themselves in the evenings. Apparently they were still comparatively struggling, and could only afford one rushlight candle, which of course, gave a very dim light, not enough to read by; and their amusement was for John and Mary to tell tales of old Suffolk, or to play alternately on the old fiddle, which was kept hanging in a baize bag at the back of the kitchen door, and to join in singing old Suffolk songs, such as 'Gee up, Dobbin'. This fiddle was made on Old London Bridge and it is a tradition in the family that it has belonged to us ever since it was so made. One of these (John the second) was ultimately destined to become Dr John Styles the well-known parson and pamphleteer of Brighton who was thought worthy of mention in Nelson's 'Islington' (Second Edition). Nelson also very kindly and patronizingly refers to John and Mary Styles as being "worthy people" in a footnote in the book. I have one rather amusing story of Dr Styles and our Society. At one of our shows I was pleased to be informed that amongst the exhibits would be a print of, Dr John. When I examined it at the show I found it was a picture of a strikingly handsome young man with black curly hair. Now Dr John at the time of the print was not so young, nor hand-some. nor was his hair black or curly. I asked. for an explanation. The serial number was all right and no one could throw any light on the mystery. Months afterwards I heard the explanation. Wall space was short, and the pictures were framed with two in each frame back to back. Had I only turned it back to front all would have been well. Dr John was sup-posed to be a very clever man, but when I tell you he married three times you will join with me in doubting the statement.

As the Styles grew up they intermarried with various Islington families, notably the Tidmarsh's, the Millard's and, in the next generation, with the Dunhill's, and I often wonder how much my cousin the celebrated Thomas Dunhill, the composer. Owes to 'pre-natal influence' and the old family fiddle. John Styles did not do very much good for himself financially, never having very much capital, until in a fortunate moment he was visited by a patron of his son William Styles, who had been working in Ireland as a journeyman carpenter at the castle of some well-known Lord (whose name unfortunately is not preserved'). Part of the work consisted of building a circular wooden case, and before this could be completed the architect died. Somebody told the noble Lord that young Styles was quite competent to finish the job by himself as he had Fade a scale model of the staircase in his spare time to amuse himself and on my grandfather being asked if he, could finish it he replied quite confidently that he could, and did. To his surprise, some time later they were visited at Islington by the noble Lord in question, who asked why they had not gone in for building houses themselves to which my great-grandfather replied that he had not got even the money for buying the ladders necessary for the work. Whereas his lordship said, 'I will fit you out everything you want,' which he did, with the consequence that in a very' short time they were enabled to repay the loan and to move into the much larger double fronted houses' backing on their own, in the Upper Street, which was, Wadden's the hairdressers.

One of my great grandfathers tales was that he was once held up between the Angel,' Islington and Sadler's Wells Theatre. He was a little man, but he had in his pocket a cherished meerschaum pipe in a case, which he promptly pulled out and snapped at the man's head as though it were a pistol. The man thinking it was a flintlock, which had mis-fired and might be snapped successfully a second time, promptly ran for his life. My great-grandfather died somewhere about the year 1832, in much the same manner as his mother had done before him, curling himself up for his last nap on, a sofa which my grandfather had made for him, and which I still have. He is buried in St Mary's, Islington, and curious may see his tombstone to-day on the back the church, the inscription on which begins lies the body of John Styles, Carpenter, of this Parish," etc., etc.

Thus came grandfather William Styles on the scene to take possession of the larger business and the house. He was always (thanks perhaps to his early upbringing) very keen on music, but he shared my dislike for 'the fiddle' as he called it, preferring the 'cello and the double-bass. He was a member of what was known, I believe, as 'The Islington Harmonic Society', together with one 'Blrdseye' a hairdresser who lived near him and other village worthies. My father told me that grandfather was very fond of Bach (which he would pronounce Batch to rhyme with Hatch) and he used to practice his part on the double-bass, whistling the treble air to himself (which only he could hear), while the whole house could hear the doleful strains of his accompaniment., and my Father has told me that he has sat on the stairs and cried for the very dolefulness of the noise. In 1840 my grandfather married for the second time, one Mary Anne Jeyes, the
daughter of John Jeyes, once a prominent City merchant in oil and salt mostly who lived in Upper Thames Street of all places, where my grandmother was born. He was a person of some importance, resident magistrate for the Tower Hamlet, and it is told of him that he had the task of receiving all the French refugees who escaped and got to London by boat at the time of the French Revolution. The order was that all those unfortunate persons should be landed as, the Tower Steps and taken straight to his house in custody, where they were lined up for identification by their friends and relations who had reached here previously. There were sore very distressing scenes witnessed as they were all of them in rags and disguises arid most of then quite penniless. It years a difficult thing to know what to do with them, as they were not the sort of people to whom one could give money. The women set up as washerwomen mostly. to do the delicate work of laundering the elaborate frilled shirts the men of that period wore; but as regards the men it was much more difficult to find some excuse for giving then money. The City merchant did not want to learn fencing, and so one had to go through the form of asking the Frenchmen to teach the young ladies of the City deportment: how to come into a room, how to sit down on a chair, how to curtsey, how to bow and leave the room, and then two or three guineas were slipped into their hands coupled with the, warmest thanks for their valuable services, some of them drew for a living. My Father had an album with very erode drawings of ships and suchlike, signed by some of the noblest names of France, in his possession. John Jeyes had two children; and his son, John Jeyes the second, went into the service of the East India Company and died in India at a comparatively early age. When my great-grandfather Jeyes retired he went to live at Ilford, which was then, of course, a most salubrious country village, and his house was situated where The Ilford Photographic Plate Works now stand. The Islington family used to visit him, driving from Islington in a little pony chaise, which was kept in the stables still standing at the bottom of Purley Place a side turning off Park Street, and my Father has told me that after they left the bottom of Canonbury Lane and crossed the Essex Road, there were no more houses (that is to say rows of houses) until they got to Ilford. This was some where in the late 'forties.

My great-grandfather Jeyes was a most severe martinet On one occasion my Father, who was only about 4 or 5 years of age at the time, pulled down a backgammon board and spilt the draughtsmen on the floor. Great-grandfather at once rang the bell and ordered that his mother should take my father home, and I remember the shouts of laughter with which we greeted the story as my Father said he was wearing a white leghorn hat with an amber bow under the left ear, and when we looked at my Father with his long grey hair and grizzled moustache and beard, and tried imagine what he looked like with such a hat on, the results were absolutely disastrous. History repeated itself 30 years afterwards when I recounted to my family one of Rackshaw's first customers, my Mother having carried me in there to buy a piece of red velvet to make me a bonnet. My irreverent youngsters greeted the information with shouts of laughter also. I have always understood that my grandfather was at one time what we now speak of as a 'big noise the old Islington Vestry. It was due to him, so I have always understood, that the curious spectacle is presented in the Upper Street off four public buildings all in a row came to pass. If you will remember. The Old Vestry Hall (which now The Lido Picture Palace). The Police Station, Unity Church and the Fire Station all come in a row together side by side and the explanation that I was given was this: - It appears that, the ground- originally belonged a man who went to Australia and subsequently vanished and was never heard of again. The ground lay derelict many years until my grandfather could bear it no longer, suggested that it should be 'borrowed' on behalf of the Parish until such time as the owner returned to claim it saying, that no private individual could possibly face the results of such an action, but that the Vestry had got no soul to be saved and no backside to be kicked'

I remember also hearing his account of the finish of the old Toll Gates which stood at the junction of the High Street and Upper Street. When the appointed hour struck or was on the point of striking, a hansom cab came dashing up to be the last one to pay, as the hour actually struck the crowd rushed at the gates and fences and tore them to pieces. He also said he remembered that, before the City Road was made, numbers of people used collect at the Angel until there were 12 or 15 in number, and they walked down to the City in a solid body over the Finsbury fields, making as much noise as they could, to persuade any possible footpads that they were a really larger party than they actually were. A very interesting character, who was a friend of my grandfather, was one F.J.Minasi. He was, at that time, a schoolmaster, his school being situated in the road running up by the side of the Agricultural Hall, the school house itself standing at the back of what was recently Huntsman's shop. He was a most amusing old chap, and told me, with great glee that when he ran for Islington Vestry as a young man against my grandfather, my grandfather said he admired his 'something' cheek, but that he would not get the seat until he had finished with it, and then he was welcome to it. I remember the awe with which I regarded Mr Minasi when I was a small boy. He was a little man with a very big nose, and all his life was known as 'Old Beak'. I could never have believed then that in future years I would come to regard him with affection. He had a strong bump of humour, and I remember on one occasion when as a very small boy they had given me the only possible remaining prize they could at prize-giving, which was the good conduct prize, and I came up plus a most glorious black eye to take it, the Vicar of Islington, who was presenting the prizes, looked at me in dismay and said In a very audible aside "Is his conduct really good?" and I heard 'Old Beak ' say in an equally loud aside, 'His Father is a Baptist Minister, but I fear he favours his Grandfather, who was anything but one.' There is a story told of Minasi that he forbade any of his scholars to patronise any of the 'penny gaffs' which flourished at the time of the World 's Fair on the opposite side of the Upper Street, 'fat women'. and the like. One day he called up certain of the boys by name, accused then of patronising the shows and soundly flogged them. He told me afterwards that he caught them out (he being an ardent astronomer) by going on to the, roof of the schoolhouse with his big celestial telescope directed on to the booths right across the Upper Street and taking the names of the boys as they entered, and came out. One of Mr Minasi's enterprises was to found the Islington Gazette. My grandfather must have done very well for himself because he practically retired from business in 1840 Then he married my grandmother, and he went to live at what is now 28, College Street, Islington, which backed on the Old Church Missionary College, which was originally a famous house marked on the maps as 'Esquire Harvey's'.

There in the year 1842 my Father was born, and perhaps for a moment we may digress and consider the political state of affairs in that year as we did before. Things had altered very much since the year 1783. In the year 1842 the King of Prussia came to England was Godfather to the 'Prince of Wales; Sir Robert Peel was pressing the repeal of duties, on articles of consumption, and wanted to institute the income tax,

My Father had no vocation 'or either carpentry or building, and. I imagine, to my grandfather's horror, became a schoolmaster, and ltimately a Baptist Minister. My first memories of him as such are at Providence Chapel, in Upper Street (which is now I believe occupied by the British Legion, but the courtway or alley up which it is situated is called Providence Place'). It was attended largely by the local hopkeepers and suchlike and his Principal Deacon was John Andrews Haslop, whose name one Is glad to see preserved over his shop in the Upper Street, although he has been dead, unfortunately, for many years. He was the 'Harmoniumist' of the Chapel also. My Father continued to live in the old house at 28 College Street after my grandfather's death, who died a few months before I was born, In 1874. My Father was the only one of us to go outside London for a wife, my Mother having come from High Wycombe. So not only are we now five generations of Londoners, but we are, with the exception of my Mother, Cockneys on both sides, and in defiance of the tradition that the third generation of Cockneys inevitably dies out I must say that every one us has been at least 2 inches taller than his Father, my great-grandfather having been a little man of about 5 feet 6 inches in height, my grandfather having been 2 inches taller than that, my , Father having been 5 feet 10 inches, and I stand 6 feet. One, at least, of my sons bids fair to be taller than I am. To revert again for a moment to F J Minasi I was somewhat amused when I joined The Islington Historical Society to find that he had almost become a legend or myth.

They were very proud of the fact that they had some letters of his in his own handwriting About and asked me if I had ever heard of him. When I told them that I attended his school when I was such a little chap that I was hardly as tall as his table, and had years afterwards subsequently gone there for a year when I became Head Boy, and sat the identical table for special tuition, they appeared somewhat amazed. Of the five generations of us three have actually been born in Islington, one in the Upper Street and two in College Street in the same house. I remember one soft night in June when the wind was in the South West and rain about, my Father carrying me up to the top room of our home at 1 College Street (this was about the year 1881) and telling me to look over towards the Agricultural Hall and listen. (In those days there was only one storey to the old Islington High School in Barrisbury Street and one could see for miles South)' from the top storey from the houses. Presently the bells of the City began to chime, and Father said, 'No, not that, not that one. NOW. Those are Bow Bells, and always remember you were born a Cockney within the sound of Bow Bells. I will conclude by relating the remark of a friend of mine who knew me well enough to be rude, who when I told him last year that it was our, 150th year in Islington remarked, 'I don't see that proves anything, except perhaps that the tradesmen in Islington must be singularly complaisant. 
Styles, William Kensett (I369878)
 
171832 William kidnapped an apparently very willing Isabella from her 1st husband. Family F8750
 
171833 William Knapp Knopp, William (I355552)
 
171834 William Major Courtenay, Captain, Royal Navy, commanding his ship, The Boston Frigate, killed in action in 1793. Courtenay, Capt. William Major (I43330)
 
171835 William married Margaret, lived in Ballyroney, County Down, Ireland. Thetown of Bryansford nearby is said to have been named for some of this family. William and Margaret Bryan sent their little son, John, into thewoods to cut a stick to make a handle for a hook used in weaving, and he was arrested for poaching.
After much trouble and expense, his father got him cleared and immediately sailed for America, where as he said, "timberwas free and there were no constables". This was the year 1718. They first settled in New Jersey or Pennsylvania. Morgan Bryan, his brother,was in Chester County, Pennsylvania, as early as 1719, where he married Martha Strode. 
Bryan, William (I337906)
 
171836 William Marsh lived quite an incredible life. He was married 3 times and managed to outlive all his wives and 5 of his 9 children. His father George Marsh, Commisioner of the Navy, had set William up initially in a business that fulfilled naval contracts. This is covered in George Marsh's diary. This business prospered greatly with the expansion of the Navy in the late 1700s and one spin off of the business was that part of it operated as a prize agent selling off foreign boats captured by the Royal Navy. This operation progressed on to become a bank which came to handle the savings of many of the rich and famous of the day, including Horatio Nelson. The Marsh family were close friends of Horatio Nelson and Lady Nelson later became godmother to William's daughter, Georgiana Nelson Marsh. The bank was recorded in the London Directory of 1797 as 'De Vismes, Cuthbert, Marsh, Creed and Co.' so presumably the part of the operation that became a bank was founded some time before this. The DeVismes might be Gerard DeVisme (1725-1797)? In the early 1800s Nelson refered to the bank as Marsh & Creed. By 1824 the bank was based at 6 Berners Street, Oxford Street and was called 'Marsh, Sibbald and Co.' and it would appear that William Marsh was the senior partner. Presumably the earlier partner, by the name of Cuthbert, was Arthur Cuthbert, the father of William's first wife Amelia. George Edward Graham later also became a partner and he was the brother of William's second wife Frances. Times were difficult for banks in the early 1820s and the bank was forced to close in 1824 after a major fraud was carried out by one of William's partners, Henry Fauntleroy. Much of this is recorded in William's diary for 1823-24 and in his list of creditors.  Marsh, William (I1387411)
 
171837 William moved his family to Hampshire and joined the church there. Thus his
children are all baptised on the same day.
He is believed to have been from the Homme Carpenters. This is speculation
that his father was James. More research needed. 
Carpenter, William (I176678)
 
171838 William Mullins made out his death-bed will on 21 February 1620/1, in which he mentions his wife Alice, daughter Priscilla, son Joseph, and married children William and Sarah who were still in Dorking at the time. Mullins, William (I121084)
 
171839 William of Antrobus-William left for America to propigate the Gospel Sainsbury, W. Noel, ed., Calender of State Papers, Colonial Series (Volume 5), America and West Indies, 1661-1668, Preserved in Her Majesty's Public Record Office (Vaduz: Kraus Reprint Ltd., 1964) First Published London: HMSO, 1880. pp. 30-31, 71-72. Antrobus, William (I50258)
 
171840 William of Bradninch later de Tracy de Tracy, Baron William (I34335)
 
171841 WILLIAM OF HOMME RESIDED IN PART OF DILWYNE, HEREFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND PER 1898
BOOK. SEE ALSO GENEALOGICAL & FAMILY HISTORY OF WESTERN NEW YORK BY LEWIS 1912.
PAGE 1252 AND 1317. PAGE 1317 GIVES BIRTH ABOUT 1480 INSTEAD OF 1440.
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT THE REAL "WILLIAM OF HOMME" WAS THE SON OF THIS WILLIAM?
AKA: William of Hereford.
AFN 8LC0-35 is the same as AFN 4JG8-24 & AFN 4JG8-XL.

!On page 33 of the Carpenter Memorial is: "The statements of (William)
Playfair, Burke (of Royal Pedigrees, etc) and Davis and Owen (Peerages) in
regard to the decent of the Tyconnel carpenters from John 1303, and also
William of Homme, establishes the fact that the Homme Carpenters are all
descended from John of 1303. William Carpenter, (No. 8) the great grandson of
William of Homme, was the direct ancestor of the Tyconnel Carpenters: and his
third son William was the progenitor of the Rehoboth branch of the family."
While Amos Carpenter dropped one (1) generation in his pedigree further
research by Raymond George Carpenter and Harry Rodgers (who found the
important wills) have confirmed the lineage.

!Oxford University records indicate that William of Hereford had sons James,
John, William and Richard.

!Holm is a saxon word signifying "a woody situation." !The property at Homme
or Holm stayed in the family until 1787, when it passed to the Deverux and
Peploe Family. Per Robinson's "Mansions and Manors of Herefordshire." In
1873 it was the residence of Lady Frances Vernon Harcourt, who was the
daughter of John Lothrop Motley, the distinguished American Historian.
Homme or Holm or Holme is in the Parish of Dilwyn, Herefordshire. The
Carpenters have possesed conciderable estate since they were officailly
"seated" there as early as 1330. The Carpenter home was sold in 1787 to
thePeploe family to help settle tax issues. Reportedly the actual home was
destroyed by fire a century ago. The massive forests in Homme were leveled
and all that remains now are small park like areas.

!This William of Homme is the common ancestor of our Carpenter Family in
America. Coat of Arms is a common way of tracing lineage. The arms granted to
Lord George Carpenter in 1719, as published in the account of his life (The
Life and Times of Lord George . . .) were Pally of six, argent and gules on a
chevron, azure,three cross crosslets, or. CREST, on a wreath a globe in a
frame all or. Supporters, two horses, party-perfess, embattled argent and
gules. MOTTO: "Per Actua Belli" (Through the Asperities of War).
John the Elder, Bishop, granduncle to this William, had the same Coat of Arms.
The same arms, less the supporters and motto, were used by the Herefordshire
Carpenter family and were emblazoned in a glass window of the college and
church at Westbury upon Trin as early as 1443. They were placed there by
permanently by Bishop John (the Elder) Carpenter of Worcester, who was a
native of Westbury and a great benefactor of the college, having rebuilt and
refounded it. Bishop John Carpenter died in 1476 and was buried in the
church, where a plain altar monument was errected to his memory. This church
(in 1890) is the Holy Trinity of Bristol, and is described in Willi's Survey
of Cathedrals, published in 1742. And in Atykn's and Rudder's History of
Gloucester where there is a very interesting sketch of Bishop John Carpenter
who was also known as "Master John Carpenter" mentioned in the will of the
town clerk of London, John Carpenter, the younger.

!FOUNDER: William Carpenter of Homme is concidered the common ancestor of the
following branches of the Carpenter Family:
- REHOBOTH, MA Branch - Capt. William C. son of William (who married Elizabeth
the daughter of John of James the son of William of Homme) of Robert (who
married Eleanor C. daughter of Robert of William the son of William of Homme)
of William of Robert of Richard the son of William of Homme.
- PROVIDENCE, RI Branch - William of Amesbury C. son of Richard of Robert (who
married Eleanor C. - see above) of William (who married Elizabeth C. - see
above) of Robert of Richard the son of William of Homme.
- PHILADELPHIA, PA Branch - Samuel the son of John the Sheriff of Robert, of
Stephen of Robert of William the son of William of Homme.
- VIRGINIA BRANCH - Nathaniel Carpenter through his sons John and Joseph.
Nathaniel was the son of Joseph Carpenter, the grandson of William Carpenter
of Amesbury, the founder of the PROVIDENCE, RI Branch of the Carpenters.
Nathaniel was the son of Hannah Carpenter, the grandson of Captain William
Carpenter, the founder of the REHOBOTH, MA Branch of the Carpenters.
- LORD LINES - William of Cobham (of William of Alexander of William of John
of James the son of William of Homme) who was granted a Coat of Arms in 1663.
AND - Warncomb Carpenter (of Thomas of James of James of William of John of
James the son of William of Homme) whose youngest son, George became page to
the Earl of Montague, and on account of faithful service rendered to the Crown
was created "Baron Carpenter of Killaghy" in 1719.
- FEMALE LINE NOT LISTED ABOVE - Alice Carpenter (of Alexander of William of
John of James the son of William of Homme) who married a Edward Southworth
then married Govenor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony.

!E-MAIL: From: "Bruce E. Carpenter"
Subject: Homme at Dilwyn
Date: Fri, 11 Jun 1999
It appears Homme at Dilwyn in Herefortshire was a manor
with some history. In the time of Edward lll (early 1300s) the
following reference appears in the Calendar of Inquisitions
Post Mortem for Herefordshire. I quote, "Homme by
Dylewe (Dilwyn). 4a. land held of (Robert) Broun by
service of 1d. yearly."
It goes on to say, "He died in parts beyond the sea, viz in
Brittany." This is to suggest that Mr. Broun was a knight
in service during the foreign wars of the 1300s. The next paragraph
states that, 'parcel of the manor of Dylewe, which is held
of the of the Earl of Lancaster." The Earl of Lancaster conducted
the wars in France for Henry lll.
Thus we can conclude that the Homme in Dilwyn was
Lancastrian land, parceled out in return for knight
service in the 1300s. Keep in mind that the Carpenters
in subsequent years were firmly within the Lancastrian
camp and household. Sincerely, Bruce E. Carpenter.

!E-MAIL: Tue, 5 Oct 1999 From: "Bruce E. Carpenter" The
following 1480 document is later Carpenter history.I happened upon it and
thought someone might like to note it. The John and William are seemingly from
the John b. 1410 in the Herefordshire Carpenter descent. The Pembryg co.is
Pembridge co. in our parlance. I think we are dealing with Dilwyn and Homme
Carpenters here. The document give us a few goodies that I for one was unaware
of. William was knighted.
Was William a priest? 1480 is well before the Reformation.What does 'vicar'
imply? This need to be worked on and interpreted. Notice the "feoffment"
applies to both Willy and Johnny. This means we are dealing with Carpenter
family assets and not church assets. One interesting revelation in the
document is that the property in question was cloth manufacture related. The
term 'wever' or weaver referred perhaps not to a single artisan, but to the
owner of a bigger facility. The term 'burgage' seems a fairly serious legal
term for a large holding. I always suspected the Herefordshire Carpenters of
being in the wool and cloth business, as I have blabbed about before. I like
to picture them raising thier sheep and processing the wool in facilities they
owned or partly owned. This document gets us real close to real life. At any
rate this is the first actual document I have seen dealing with William of
Homme.He has his title, his career and his real estate holdings.Ladies and
gentlemen, I present you with the long mysterious Sir William of Homme. From
Descriptive Catalogue
of Deeds, pp. 31-2, document A. 10675.
"Feoffment by John Dey of Nuneton and Agnes his wife, to Sir William
Carpenter, perpetual vicar of the parish church of Staunton beside Pembryg, co.
Hereford, John Carpenter, brother of the said William, Thomas Shepey of
Nuneton, and Nicholas Dalton, otherwise called Tayler, of Kynges, co. Warwick,
of a burgage and a half-burgage in Nuneton which they had by the gift of
Richard George, Maud his wife, and John Freman of Coventre, who had the sameby
the feoffment of John Thorp late of Coventre, 'weaver' to them and the heirs
and assigns of the said William and John Carpenter. Witnesses:- Sir Richard
Cokkes, vicar of the parish church of Nuneton, William Asshe, then bailiff of
the said town and others (named). The Conception, 19 Edward IV.
Sincerely, Bruce E. Carpenter.

!E-MAIL: Wed, 6 Oct 1999 From: John F. Chandler"
Bruce wrote:
"The Pembryg co.is Pembridge co. in our parlance."
I don't think anyone will be surprised to hear that there is no Pembridge Co.
in Great Britain. The phrase used in the text was Staunton beside Pembryg, co.
Hereford, which would be Staunton (near Pembridge), Herefordshire. As it
happens, there is another Staunton only a few miles away, so it is necessary
to make the distinction.
"Was William a priest? 1480 is well before the Reformation. What does 'vicar'
imply?"
Yes. The term "vicar" connotes a stand-in (for the "real" ecclesiastical
authority), but the job is, in practice, almost always permanent, as it was
for William. Thus, the vicar is the pastor of his parish.
"Notice the "feoffment" applies to both Willy and Johnny. This means we are
dealing with Carpenter family assets and not church assets."
That goes without saying. A mere vicar would not be the land holder of record
for the Church's property.
"in the document is that the property in question was cloth manufacture
related."
That is a rather wild extrapolation from very limited data.
""Feoffment by John Dey of Nuneton and Agnes his wife, Notice that both John
and his wife joined in the deed. Because of the wife's rights of dower, a
married man could not alienate property without her consent.
William Carpenter, perpetual vicar of the parish church of Staunton beside
Pembryg, co. Hereford, John Carpenter, brother of the said William, Thomas
Shepey of Nuneton, and Nicholas Dalton, otherwise called Tayler, of Kynges, co.
Warwick ..."
The relationship among the four feoffees is not made clear here.
Although William evidently lived in Staunton, and Nicholas Dalton/Taylor lived
in Kings, the property was in the borough of Nuneton.
"... of a burgage and a half-burgage in Nuneton ..."
Note that the term "burgage" does not imply any particular size of property,
but rather the form of tenure -- the property was within a borough.
"... which they had by the gift of Richard George, Maud his wife, and John
Freman of Coventre ..."
Note, again, the inclusion of Richard's wife in the previous transfer.
As long as we are making wild speculations, it would be appropriate here to
wonder if Richard was the father of John Dey's wife Agnes.
"... who had the same by the feoffment of John Thorp late of Coventre,
'weaver' ..."
Note that the only mention of weaving is as the occupation of a three- times
removed previous holder of the property!
"... to them and the heirs and assigns of the said William and John Carpenter."
I wonder why the other two feoffees' heirs and assigns are not mentioned here..
. John Chandler.

!E-MAIL: Wed, 06 Oct 1999 FROM: "Pat Hobson"
Dear Folks,
While we are entertaining some of the more intriguing possibilities posed by
Bruce Carpenter's recent postings, let's be careful not to take terms with
both modern and medieval usages and assume they are the same things. Here's
what I remember from college, seminary, and reformation history about the late
medieval period:
1. English clergy were poorly trained, or sometimes not trained at all.
They were poorly paid on the local level, so much so that they frequently had
more than one parish or "living" to make ends meet. They frequently did not
live in their parishes. A "succesful" cleric might well be sub-contracting
his work, as it were, to other clergy. Someone might be vicar of St. Mary's
here and St. David's there, and never personally show up to do the services.
This did not generally endear them to their parishioners. The laity, however,
had very little to do with who was appointed as their parish clergy: the
Bishops (in close consultation with the large landowners who generally funded
the clerics) appointed priests.
2. There were "minor orders" in addition to the priesthood. One could be
"ordained" to be a lector, bellringer, deacon, sub-deacon, doorkeeper &
exorcist and never go on to the priesthood. Having these minor orders did put
a man under the protection of the church courts, however.
3. The only clergy more disliked than the Bishops and the parish clergy were
the monastics, who had title to almost one-third of the arable land in England.
The merchant class was happy to cooperate in the dissolution of the
monasteries under Henry VIII when it meant they had more grazing land and
fewer church taxes.
4. The great disparity between the poorly trained, poorly paid local clergy,
and the Bishops (who were government functionaries and very well off indeed)
created a very fertile atmosphere for the reformation, English style. Th
reformation in England was punctuated by anti-clericalism, land-grabbing, the
flowering of the liturgy in English, and a bewildering series of Acts of
Parliament. In Germany, the reformation started with the debate of scholarly
theses; in France with the eating of sausages on Ash Wednesday, and in England
with legislation!
5. I can say with great assurance that in modern usage, a vicar is a priest
in charge of a parish that is not financially self-sufficient. In these
churches, the Bishop is considered to be the Rector and appoints a Vicar to
serve for him (or her). A Rector is a priest in charge of a financially self-
sufficient parish and has certain canonical rights associated with that. For
example, a Vicar serves at the Bishop's pleasure and can be employed one day
and gone the next. A Rector cannot be dismissed without certain procedures
and constraints, even by the Bishop. So....it's better to be rector. This
point applies to the Episcopal Church in the U.S. at this time: the Anglican
Church in England has different fine print, and the fine print matters a great
deal. Pat Hobson. 
Carpenter, William (I176615)
 
171842 WILLIAM of HUMBERSTONE SMITH:

CAME FROM GLOUCESTISHIRE, ENGLAND TO BOSTON CA. 1635. MOVED TO
HEMPSTEAD, LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK CA. 1639

"OUR SMITH/SMYTH ENGLISH ANCESTRY:"

CHARLES WARNER SMITH PUBLISHED IN 1945 A PAPER ON HIS SMITH ANCESTRY "THE
SMITH OF HERRICKS" - IN WHICH HE STATES: "IN 1635 OUR FIRST AMERICAN
ANCESTOR CAME DOWN THE GANGPLANK INTO BOSTON, (AND) HE HAD WITH HIM A
"BREECHES BIBLE," (ON THE FLY LEAF OF WHICH) IS A CRUDELY DRAWN COAT OF
ARMS...'SIX CROSSES OS PATEE FITCHEE DESIGN AND A CHEVRON ON WHICH ARE
THREE FLEUR DE LIS, COMPRISE THE SHIELD.' THE BIBLE WAS PRINTED IN 1607
BY ROBERT BARKER. (IT WAS LATER IN THE POSSESSION OF A COUSIN, WALTER
CURTIS SMITH, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN CA. 1945)

" THIS BREECHES BIBLE, WITH THE COAT OF ARMS INSCRIBED WITHIN, REPRESENTED
THE COAT OF ARMS OF WILLIAM SMITH, OF THE SMITH/SMYTH FAMILY OF
HUMBERSTONE, COUNTY OF LINCOLN, AND OF NIBLEY, HOOBY COUNTY, LEICESTER,
COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER IN ENGLAND. THIS COAT OF ARMS, ISSUED IN 1543: ARMS:
SABLE ON A CHEVRON ENGRAILED BETWEEN SIX CROSSES PATEE FITCHEE, OR AS MANY
FLUERS-DE-LIS AZURE. CREST: HELMET TOPPED BY A FALCON WITH A FISH IN ITS
BEAK. MOTTO: NO ONE WITHOUT THE CROSS IS HAPPY.

THE COAT OF ARMS SHOWS THAT THE FAMILY PARTICIPATED IN SIX CRUSADES AND
THREE WARS WITH FRANCE BY 1543.

HUMBERSTONE, ON THE HUMBER RIVER WHICH FLOWS ACROSS THE COUNTY OF LINCOLN
IS IN NORTHEASTERN ENGLAND. LINCOLNSHIRE IS THE 2ND LARGEST COUNTY IN
ENGLAND, NOTED, NOT FOR ITS BEAUTY, BUT FOR ITS AGRICULTURE. TOWNS
INCLUDE BOSTON, LINCOLN, HULL, ELY, YARMOUTH, NORWICH, CAMBRIDGE, AND
OTHERS. IT LIES TO THE NORTH AND EAST OF LONDON. ALONG THE COAST OF THE
NORTH SEA.

THE LINEAGE OF THE SMITH/SMYTH COAT OF ARMS: 1. THOMAS SMYTH, OF STAFFORD
1543. 2. RICHARD SMYTH, ALDERMAN AND SHERIFF OF LONDON 1508 3. WILLIAM
SMYTH OF HUMBERSTONE.

IT IS SURMISED THAT "OUR" WILLIAM SMITH, WHO CAME DOWN THE GANGPLANK IN
BOSTON IN 1635, CARRYING HIS BREECHES BIBLE, WAS A DESCENDANT OF THE ABOVE
LINE, SINCE THE BIBLE HAD A HAND-DRAWN COPY OF THIS COAT OF ARMS.

"OUR" WILLIAM SMITH WAS A RELATIVE (Brother?) OF RICHARD SMITH, OF
NARAGANSETT AND THORNBURY. RICHARD SMITH MARRIED JOHANNA BARTON IN 1621
AND WAS FROM THE SAME COUNTY IN ENGLAND AS WILLIAM SMITH WHO MARRIED ELLEN
HILL 28 JANUARY 1621 IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND.

WILLIAM SMITH, OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND, AND HIS WIFE, ELLEN HILL SMITH
HAD AT LEAST TWO SONS: 1. BARTHOLOMEW 2. ABRAHAM SMITH OTHERS.

WILLIAM SMITH PROFESSED TO BE A BAPTIST, AND WAS PERSECUTED FOR THIS
BELIEF, AND DRIVEN FROM THE TOWN OF BOSTON. HE MAY HAVE GONE TO
WETHERSFIELD AFTER 1636 AND LIVED IN THE HOUSEHOLD OF RICHARD SMITH, HIS
RELATIVE (COUSIN OR BROTHER?)

IT WAS STATED THAT RICHARD SMITH, FROM GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ENGLAND, CAME TO
BOSTON IN 1630 WITH A RELATIVE. HIS COUSIN/BROTHER, JOHN SMITH MAY HAVE
COME WITH HIM. FOLLOWED IN 1636 BY WILLIAM SMITH.

RICHARD SMITH PURCHASED NARRAGANSETT FROM THE INDIAN SACHEMS IN 1637. HE
AND JOHN SMITH, AND WILLIAM SMITH MOVED TO LONG ISLAND IN 1642, AND
ESTABLISHED THE SETTLEMENT OF MESPATH. THE INDIANS ATTACKED IN 1643 AND
JOHN SMITH WAS KILLED.

IN 1646 RICHARD SMITH AND WILLIAM SMITH WERE INVOLVED IN A COURT BATTLE
WITH THE REV. FRANCIS DOUGHTY AT NEWTON (MESPATH), LONG ISLAND, THIS TRIAL
ENDED IN APRIL OF 1647.

IN 1647 WILLIAM SMITH, OF HEMPSTEAD, LONG ISLAND, DIVIDED LAND WITH HIS
SON, ABRAHAM SMITH.

IT WAS STATED WILLIAM SMITH, ALONG WITH 40 FAMILIES, HAD FLED BOSTON
BECAUSE OF RELIGIOUS REASONS. THEY CAME TO HEMPSTEAD BY 1644/45. WILLIAM
SMITH, AND HIS WIFE ELLEN HILL, HAD TWO SONS, BARTHOLOMEW SMITH AND
ABRAHAM SMITH.

BARTHOLOMEW HAD WILLIAM, OF JAMAICA IN 1677, WIFE HANNAH; ROUSE JOHN SMITH
(TAKING HIS STEPFATHER'S NAME) AND ABRAHAM OF JAMAICA WHO DIED BEFORE 1734
WITHOUT ISSUE.

ABRAHAM SMITH, SON OF WILLIAM AND ELLEN (HILL) SMITH LIVED WITH HIS FATHER
AT HEMPSTEAD, AND IT WAS THROUGH HIS LINE THAT THE BREECHES BIBLE
DESCENDANDED TO JACOB SMITH OF SALT POINT.

ABRAHAM SMITH HAD A LAND GRANT IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, IN 1641, AND IS
BELIEVED TO BE THE SAME ABRAHAM SMITH WHO HAD LOT #43 IN HEMPSTEAD IN
1647. IN MARCH 1656/57 ABRAHAM SMITH AND 13 OTHERS WERE FREEHOLDERS OF
HEMPSTEAD, AND PETITION DIRECTOR-GENERAL PETER STUYVESANT "FOR A PLACE TO
IMPROVE THEIR LABOURS," AND A GRANT WAS GIVEN THEM FOR "THE NEW PLANTACENN
NEAR YE BEVER POND COMMONLY CALLED JEMACO."

THERE, THE TOWN GAVE ABRAHAM SMITH, SAMUEL, AND MORACE, TO "EACHE OFF YEA
A HOUSELOTTE LYING UPON YE WEST QUARTER."

IN 1661 ABRAHAM SMITH, AND OTHERS, PROMISED TO INFORM THE AUTHORITIES OF
ANY CONVENTION OF QUAKERS IN THE TOWN OF RUSTDORP...."

IN MARCH 1662 HE WAS PAID BY THE TOWN FOR "BEATING YE DRUM ON YE SABBATH,
AND OTHER PUBLIC DAIES, AND TO HAVE HIS PAY IN TOBACCO."

THAT THE SMITHS HAD THREE CHILDREN: 1. ISAAK/ISAAC SMITH (1657-1746)
PROGENITOR OF THE HERRICKS "BIBLE" LINE. 2. ABRAHAM SMITH, JR. 3. ESTHER
SMITH WHO MARRIED "MILL JOHN" TOWNSEND AS HIS 2ND WIFE.

ABRAHAM SMITH, JR. MIGRATED TO "CAPE MAY" IN SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY. HIS
WIFE'S NAME WAS MARGERY, MAIDEN NAME UNKNOWN. AND THEY WERE THE PARENTS OF
THOMAS SMITH, SR. BORN CA. 1672. 
Smith, William (I217267)
 
171843 William Oliphant lived in Guilford Co. N.C.
Donald Oliphant was a Norwegian nobleman.He was imprisoned by Donald Bane, King of the Scots. in 1093 A.D.
Laurence Oliphant was 11th generation from Donald and he was created a peer by King James 11 and was made Baron Oliphant in 1456.
Oliphant Genealogy 1093-1893 , Salt Lake City:filmed by the Gen. Soc. of Utah 1973 on 1 microfilm reel 35 MM. British film area 0943158 item 1. Also ref. to Oliphant in BritishFilm area 0278021.
Oliphant Fam. History, descendants of William and Betsy in the U.S. and Can. book area 929.273 OL 36s. 
Oliphant, William Samuel? (I311514)
 
171844 William Paget of Wednesbury (Staffordshire)
then London (Serjeant at Mace in London) 
Paget, William (I699550)
 
171845 William Paterson Van Rensselaer, the last patroons second son married in a row two granddaughters of Moses Rogers who became rich during the revolutionary war. Two of his children married grandchildren of Anson Greene Phelps, the actual founder of what would become the Phelps-Dodge dynasty, metal traders and builders of a mining company which is still part of the Fortune’s 500 largest industrial corporations today.
Kiliaen Van Rensselaer (1845-1905) married Olivia Phelps Atterbury in 1870 and his sister Catherine Goodhue Van Rensselaer (b.1850) married Anson Phelps Atterbury in 1891.
The Atterburys however were a branch of the Phelps family which was not involved in Phelps, Dodge & Co or the subsequent corporation. 
van Rensselaer, William Paterson (I323573)
 
171846 William Peloquin Pellican, Rev. William (I1385991)
 
171847 William Penn delivered her funeral oration and because of high esteem in which
he held Mrs. Lloyd, he gave the entire lot in the southwest corner of the
cemetery at the meeting house in Arch Street, Philadelphia, to the Lloyd
family. From "History and Name of the Lloyd Family", unknown author. 
Gardiner, Patience (I316058)
 
171848 William Petty is listed as a pioneer ancester of Indiana. He settled in Wayne co. Ind in 1824-5
The Beesons, Pettys and Cains all came from Randolph co, NC. The move was an obvious quaker settlement move. 
Petty, William (I313537)
 
171849 William Pridels Prideaux, William (I1414023)
 
171850 William Prouse le Prouz, William (I183190)
 

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