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Personen > Eduard v. Treskow (1837-1898), Generalmajor

* 19. 12. 1837 Radojewo bei Posen, + 1.1. 1898 Kassel; ev.; RR d JohO; preuß. GeneralMaj. z. D. , verh. 1870 mit Klara, geb. v. Hausmann (1850-1927); V Heinrich v. Treskow (1795-1861), Gutsherr auf Radojewo; M Antonie, geb. v. Bünting (1811-1860); G Maximilian (1830-1909), Otto (1931-1901), Richard (1832-1914), Oskar (1833-1883), Franz (1835-1910), Friedrich (1839-1857), Heinrich (1840-1827), Artur (1842-1913), Ernst (1844-1915), Hermann (1847-1870), Georg (1850-1851), Erich (1852-1922); T Elisabeth (1871-vor 1945).

Eduard nahm mit sieben seiner Brüder an den Kriegen von 1864, 1866 und 1870/71 teil und war ab 1879 Major im Hessischen Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 83 unter Befehl des Fürsten Georg Franz zu Waldeck und Pyrmont. Im Jahre 1880 wurde er Kommandeur des Hessischen Leibgarde-Regiments Nr. 115 unter Großherzog Ludwig IV. von Hessen und in dieser Funktion auch als Generalmajor verabschiedet.

Das Leibgarde-Regiments Nr. 115 wurde im Jahre 1621 errichtet und war damit das älteste Regiment der Alten deutschen Armee. Die Bezeichnung "Leibgarde" erhielt es im Jahre 1806, als die bisherige Landgrafschaft Hessen-Darmstadt zum Großherzogtum Hessen wurde. Das Großherzoglich Hessische Militär wurde 1872 in die Armee des neugegründeten deutschen Kaiserreichs aufgenommen und gehörte im Jahre 1914 zum XVIII. Armeekorps/ Frankfurt am Main, innerhalb dessen es die 25. (Großherzoglich Hessische) Division bildete. Garnison war immer Darmstadt. Traditionell waren die regierenden Landgrafen und Großherzöge Inhaber des Regiments, so auch der letzte Großherzog Ernst Ludwig (1868-1937). 
von Treskow, Generalmajor Eduard (I1388012)
 
2


!Emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1697 
Cadwalader, John (I435775)
 
3


A great rift arose between the two surviving heirs of William Egerton Garnett-Botfield---Billie McLean Garnett-Botfield and his sister Helen Alexandrina ["Alix"] CORBETT-WINDER.

Upon the death of their mother, Elizabeth Clulow Garnett-Botfield in 1921, Alix was bequeathed all of her mother's personal effects including much of the furnishings and contents of the family homes at The Hut and Decker Hill.

This became a vicious bone of contention when Billie decided to sell off the mansions and estates and Alix immediately made plans to carry off many of the family heirlooms and possessions to the Corbett-Winder mansion at Vaynor Park, Berriew in Montgomeryshire.

We can get some sense of her personality from the copy of her husband's Will. Captain Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder died on December 18, 1961
and he left behind a very brief, hand-written note dated June 26, 1935 as his only official last will and testament. It was as blunt as a suicide note.

Captain Corbett-Winder's anguished two-sentence Will reads as follows:

The last will and testament of me, Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder.

I leave everything to my wife Helen Stella Alexandrina to do with exactly what she likes and how she likes.

One wonders whether he retained the same sentiments towards his wife thirty years later when he went to his final peace. He left her personal effects valued at a meagre L360-16s-0d.

Almost exactly one year later, on December 20, 1962, Alex CORBETT- WINDER followed her husband to the grave. By contrast, she left an estate worth L143,798-9s-0d---a very comfortable living indeed at 1962 values.

Her will had been written and signed before her husband's death [March 4, 1961] and was not revised after his demise. The principal beneficiary of Alix Corbett-Winder's will therefore became her only daughter, Clulow Riba Lilla Dugdale [born in 1920]---who became Mrs. John Eldon Marshall Dugdale of Montgomeryshire.

I GIVE free of duty to my Daughter Clulow Riba Lilla Dugdale absolutely all my jewellery and articles of personal use or ornament and wearing apparel.

I GIVE all my furniture, plate, plated articles, linen, china, books, manuscripts, pictures, drawings, prints, engravings, etchings, lithographs, printed music, musical instruments (including instruments of mechanical reproduction of music with all records for the same) wireless sets, works of art, and other articles of household or domestic use or ornament and all the outdoor gardening effects in or around my dwelling house including motor cars and motor accessories if any and whether such indoor and outdoor effects are temporarily stored elsewhere or not (except such articles as for their trifling value or perishable nature my trustees shall at their absolute discretion consider unsuitable to be settled which excepted articles I give to my said Husband absolutely) to my Trustees upon trust.

The will goes on to say that all of these personal effects and belongings are intended for the use of her husband during his lifetime, and afterwards will become part of her Residuary Estate. Her husband is required to keep any and all such property in good repair, and insured against loss or damage...but does not need to make an inventory.

I GIVE the following pecuniary legacies free of duty:

a) To my husband Captain Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder one thousand pounds

b) To Nora Walker one hundred pounds

c) To my Godchild John Lyon Corbett-Winder one hundred pounds

d) To my Godchild David Barratt one hundred pounds

e) To my Godchild Mary Christine Sybil Coles one hundred pounds

f) To my Brother, William McLean Garnett-Botfield five hundred pounds

g) To Arthur Thomas Ellis of Glan Rhiew Cottage Berriew
the sum of five hundred pounds as a token of appreciation of his services but in the event of his death in my lifetime then I give the sum of one hundred pounds to his wife

h) I give to Eunice Edwards the sum of one hundred pounds if she is in my employment at the time of my death in addition to any monies that may be owing to her by me at the time of my death and if my dog "Sosi" should survive myself and my husband I give my dog to Eunice Edwards and ask her to look after it.

The next section of the Will deals with a Deed of Family Arrangement dated May 11, 1938 between John Robert Howard McLean, William McLean Garnett-Botfield, Cyril Own Langley, and Alix Corbett-Winder.
The purpose of this Deed of Family Arrangement appears to have been to settle the disbursement of property and possessions among the descendants of the McLean side of the family---but this is not entirely clear from the current Will at hand. Alix leaves her share of this settlement to her husband Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder.

All of her real and personal estate (except that which is specifically disposed of by terms of this Will) are put in the trust of her Trustees who are authorised to sell, invest, or manage according to their best judgement.

From money arising from this trust, her debts and funeral expenses are to be paid. The residue is to be invested by the Trustees, and the income paid to her husband for his remaining life, and after his death to be awarded to her daughter Clulow Riba Lila Dugdale, or if she too is dead, to her surviving children in equal shares.


GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Helen Alexandrina "Alix"
[1887-1962]
Helen Alexandrina GARN ETT-BOTFIELD was born at Shifnal in 1887 and was
the daughter of William Eger ton GARNETT-BOTFIELD and Elizabeth Clulow
HOWARD-McLEAN. She had one older br other, William "Billie" McLean
GARNETT-BOTFIELD and one younger brother, Alfr ed "Clulow" Fitzgerald
GARNETT-BOTFIELD. Clulow was killed in action during World War I.
A great rift arose between the two surviving heirs of William Ege rton
Garnett-Botfield---Billie McLean Garnett-Botfield and his sister Helen
Alexandrina ["Alix"] CORBETT-WINDER.
Upon the death of their mother, Elizabe th Clulow Garnett-Botfield in
1921, Alix was bequeathed all of her mother's p ersonal effects including
much of the furnishings and contents of the family homes at The Hut and
Decker Hill.
This became a vicious bone of contention when Billie decided to sell off
the mansions and estates and Alix immediatel y made plans to carry off
many of the family heirlooms and possessions to the Corbett-Winder
mansion at Vaynor Park, Berriew in Montgomeryshire.
We can g et some sense of her personality from the copy of her husband's
Will. Captai n Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder died on December 18,
1961and he left behin d a very brief, hand-written note dated June 26,
1935 as his only official la st will and testament. It was as blunt as a
suicide note.
Captain Corbett-W inder's anguished two-sentence Will reads as follows:
"The last will and testa ment of me, Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winder. I
leave everything to my wife H elen Stella Alexandrina to do with exactly
what she likes and how she likes."
One wonders whether he retained the same sentiments towards his wife
thirty years later when he went to his final peace. He left her
personal effects valued at a meagre L360-16s-0d.
Almost exactly one year later, on December 20 , 1962, Alex CORBETT-
WINDER followed her husband to the grave. By contrast , she left an
estate worth L143,798-9s-0d---a very comfortable living indeed at 1962
values.
Her will had been written and signed before her husband's de ath [March
4, 1961] and was not revised after his demise. The principal
beneficiary of Alix Corbett-Winder's will therefore became her only
daughter, Clulow Riba Lilla Dugdale [born in 1920]---who became Mrs.
John Eldon Marsh all Dugdale of Montgomeryshire.
The will read:
"I GIVE free of duty to my Dau ghter Clulow Riba Lilla Dugdale absolutely
all my jewellery and articles of p ersonal use or ornament and wearing
apparel
"I GIVE all my furniture, plate, plated articles, linen, china, books,
manuscripts, pictures, drawings, print s, engravings, etchings,
lithographs, printed music, musical instruments (inc luding instruments of
mechanical reproduction of music with all records for t he same) wireless
sets, works of art, and other articles of household or dome stic use or
ornament and all the outdoor gardening effects in or around my dw elling
house including motor cars and motor accessories if any and whether su ch
indoor and outdoor effects are temporarily stored elsewhere or not
(exce pt such articles as for their trifling value or perishable nature my
trustees shall at their absolute discretion consider unsuitable to be
settled which e xcepted articles I give to my said Husband absolutely) to
my Trustees upon tr ust".
The will goes on to say that all of these personal effects and belongin gs
are intended for the use of her husband during his lifetime, and
afterw ards will become part of her Residuary Estate. Her husband is
required to k eep any and all such property in good repair, and insured
against loss or dam age...but does not need to make an inventory.
I GIVE the following pecuniary l egacies free of duty:
a) To my husband Captain Frederick Feilden Corbett-Winde r one thousand
pounds
b) To Nora Walker one hundred pounds
c) To my Godchil d John Lyon Corbett-Winder one hundred pounds
d) 
Garnett-Botfield, Helen Stella Alexandrina (I270137)
 
4


Alfred Clulow Fitzgerald Garnett-Botfield was the youngest and the most talented of three children born to William Egerton Garnett-Botfield, squire of the Hut at Bishop's Castle, and of his wife, Elizabeth Clulow Howard-McLean of Aston Hall, Salop.

He was born on June 16, 1892 and probably derived his first name from his late uncle, Alfred Stanton Garnett-Botfield [who had died a bachelor the year before], and his second name from his mother's grandfather, Aaron Clulow. Where his third name came from , we can't say---perhaps the namesake of a
godfather or friend of the family.

Clulow, as he was known to family and friends, grew up in the lap of luxury. When his grandfather, William Bishton Garnett-Botfield died in January, 1903, the family moved into the great mansion house at Decker Hill, Shifnal, where a household staff of nine live-in servants catered to the family's every need.

Clulow had an ear for music, and played a number of musical instru-ments with great proficiency and talent. An inventory of the music room at Decker Hill , taken in 1922 shows many of Clulow's musical belongings still there, including music stands, music cabinets and volumes of sheet music as well as a harmonium, organ, harp, banjo and guitar.

In January of 1906, at age 14, Clulow followed his brother Billie up to Eton , residing there as an inmate of Churchill House. He stayed on at Eton until term end at Christmas 1911.

With Eton behind him, Clulow proceeded straightway on to Trinity College, Cambridge---again following in the footsteps of his brother---where he intended to pursue a career in engineering.

Like many Garnetts before and after him at university, Clulow had a special affinity for athletics as well as for scholarship. This manifested itself particularly in a keen interest in rowing.

In each of his first two years at Cambridge, Clulow stroked the winning boat in the Varsity Trial Eights. Though rowing became his chief recreation and enjoyment, he took part as well in most other outdoor
sports.

The great powder keg of war in Europe brought an abrupt end to the tranquil life of Cambridge.

On the very first day of the war, 22-year old Clulow along with a handful of other classmates marched down to the Army office and signed up for a front line seat to the Great -War-to-end-all-Wars.

He didn't know what he was getting into. For him, it was all just one big lark...a sophomoric act of daring do...another chance to prove his metal.

He never thought of being killed. If you asked him, he imagined that he'd come home and tell every one about it. It never entered his mind
that he might not come back again.

All he could think of was that he had his ticket to the big show---a ring side seat, at that. Better get a move on. Act quickly, or it might all be over before we get there.

But the battlefields of France were a far cry from the polite playing fields of Eton and the jolly regattas of Cambridge. There, in the muddy trenches of La Bassee, Givenchy, Neuve Chapelle and Richebourge-l'Avoue, the innocents met the unspeakable dragon face-to-face.

He was first assigned as second lieutenant to the Rifle Brigade, training with them at Sheerness until the unit shipped out to France in November, 1914.

But not long after arriving at the front line, Clulow was attached as a full lieutenant with the lst South Wales Borderers. It was a jolly fine troop, populated with many of his fellow west country men---the early recruits from Shropshire, Cheshire and Lancashire.

Whatever objective the maneuvre actually had was lost in the inner-most minds of the allied generals.

In truth, it served no great purpose at all. No strategic or tactical goal could possibly have been achieved. It was intended simply to smooth out a kink in the long line of trenches that meandered haphazardly across the map. A deadly game of cat and mouse, check and mate.

It is now the Spring of 1915... bringing a hoped for thaw in the stalemate that freezes the western front in terminal rigor mortis. The opposing armies stand astride an endless string of insignificant villages dotting Flanders---La Bassee, Neuve Chapelle, Armentieres, Estaire...marching all the way to Richebourge-l'Avoue.

In the background, the guns roar on without interruption---the sound of ten thousand thunders. Several guns blast away close by, with violent repurcussions. Every detonation possesses a resounding tail as the
missile tears through the air, passing right overhead and carrying on to its destination. It is like a shrill scream of anquish and despair circling the world with lightning speed, whizzing only a few yards above the
soil. A hurricane of death and destruction.

We make our way across the shapeless country; no road remains, no fields, no vegetation, no form, no colour, only enormous holes and hollows, slopes and trenches dug out by the fury of shell fire.

Nearly all the trees are stipped horizontally as if they had been touched by a red-hot gridiron...

It is astonishing and unbelievable what one sees on a battlefield after an action in which the enemy has been destroyed and when the hurricane has passed...every kind of object, no matter how opposite in nature,
is mixed together. Books, easy chairs, half buried in the earth, broken bayonets, stockings, tin receptacles of every description, German caps trodden under foot, empty bottles by the hundred...and then cartridges--
-hundreds and thousands of them. All mixed up by the shells that fall over and over again on the same spot, all again unburied and shot into the air, refalling and covering other things that were to suffer the same
fate, mixed and remixed with the earth, under the constant torture of the inexorable explosives

[Correspondent F. Matania, eye-witness to the battle at Neuve Chapelle, April, 1915 as reported in The Sphere, May 15, 1915]

By a small miracle, Lieut. Garnett-Botfield survived the assault on Neuve Chapelle and sloshed on with his platoon through the muddy ooze, across the desolate landscape to Richebourge-l'Avoue.

There, outside the town, they find more trenches, threading like animal runs between the craters. Outside the main line of British trenches is No Man's Land and beyond that the German rat holes.

All the while, overhead, the terrible breath of the dragon rumbles on, clanging and banging like a demon at the door.

The tremendous whistle arrives as if from the gigantic throat of a monster with the deafening vibration of a thousand iron plates...

In two seconds it becomes the falling of heaven itself, the end of the world, that freezes one's marrow, annihilates and destroys ...

Nearer and nearer it comes---on us, in us, and there on the top of the dug-out it resolves itself into a detonation which seems to strike every single particle of the body.

The soil shakes with a sinister concussion. An immense cloud of black smoke tears itself upwards and disappears, while a shower of formless black fragments falls on us.

The old trench lies in front of the platoon, writhing like a devious underground snake slithering away from the breastwork of the main British fortifications. They have been ordered to move down the snake's back, out onto No Man's Land toward the German lines.

Over the din of death, Lieut. Garnett-Botfield hears himself shouting something to his men. It sounds far away---another man's voice, not his: "Well, boys, I'm going...Who is going to follow?"

Then he climbs up over the lip of the trench, arching his rifle back then forward in a long graceful sweep, like an arpeggio hanging frozen in mid air.

The bullet mades a soft splatter---the sound of a plug pushed through a pumpkin. It races painlessly through Bach's Fugue in A Minor... past the feel of sunshine on a rower's shoulder blades...tearing into the
fragile cellular memory of rolling Shropshire hills...

And then, all at once, he is dead.

[Lt. Alfred Clulow FitzGerald GARNETT-BOTFIELD of the South Wales Borderers Regiment, was killed in action on May 9, 1915 at Richebourg L'Avoue, France. Source: Army Officers Records of War Deaths 1914-1920]

GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Alfred Clulow Fitzgerald
[1892-1915]
Alfred Clulow Fitzgera ld Garnett-Botfield was the youngest and the most
talented of three children born to William Egerton Garnett-Botfield,
squire of the Hut at Bishop's Cas tle, and of his wife, Elizabeth Clulow
Howard-McLean of Aston Hall, Salop.
He was born on June 16, 1892 and probably derived his first name from his
lat e uncle, Alfred Stanton Garnett-Botfield [who had died a bachelor
the year before], and his second name from his mother's grandfather,
Aaron Clulow. W here his third name came from , we can't say---perhaps
the namesake of a
go dfather or friend of the family.
Clulow, as he was known to family and friend s, grew up in the lap of
luxury. When his grandfather, William Bishton Garne tt-Botfield died in
January, 1903, the family moved into the great mansion house at Decker
Hill, Shifnal, where a household staff of nine live-in servan ts catered
to the family's every need.
Clulow had an ear for music, and played a number of musical instru-ments
with great proficiency and talent. A n inventory of the music room at
Decker Hill , taken in 1922 shows many of Cl ulow's musical belongings
still there, including music stands, music cabinets and volumes of sheet
music as well as a harmonium, organ, harp, banjo and gu itar.
In January of 1906, at age 14, Clulow followed his brother Billie up t o
Eton , residing there as an inmate of Churchill House. He stayed on at
Eton until term end at Christmas 1911.
With Eton behind him, Clulow proceeded straightway on to Trinity College,
Cambridge---again following in the footst eps of his brother---where he
intended to pursue a career in engineering.
L ike many Garnetts before and after him at university, Clulow had a
special a ffinity for athletics as well as for scholarship. This
manifested itself par ticularly in a keen interest in rowing.
In each of his first two years at Cam bridge, Clulow stroked the winning
boat in the Varsity Trial Eights. Though rowing became his chief
recreation and enjoyment, he took part as well in mo st other outdoor
sports.
The great powder keg of war in Europe brought an abrupt end to the
tranquil life of Cambridge.
On the very first day of the war, 22-year old Clulow along with a
handful of other classmates marched do wn to the Army office and signed up
for a front line seat to the Great -War-t o-end-all-Wars.
He didn't know what he was getting into. For him, it was a ll just one
big lark...a sophomoric act of daring do...another chance to prov e his
metal.
He never thought of being killed. If you asked him, he imagin ed that
he'd come home and tell every one about it. It never entered his min d
that he might not come back again. All he could think of was that he had
his ticket to the big show---a ring side seat, at that. Better get a
move on . Act quickly, or it might all be over before we get there.
But the battlefi elds of France were a far cry from the polite playing
fields of Eton and the jolly regattas of Cambridge. There, in the muddy
trenches of La Bassee, Giv enchy, Neuve Chapelle and Richebourge-l'Avoue,
the innocents met the unspeaka ble dragon face-to-face.
He was first assigned as second lieutenant to the Ri fle Brigade, training
with them at Sheerness until the unit shipped out to Fr ance in November,
1914.
But not long after arriving at the front line, Cl ulow was attached as a
full lieutenant with the lst South Wales Borderers. It was a jolly fine
troop, populated with many of his fellow west country me n---the early
recruits from Shropshire, Cheshire and Lancashire.
Whatever o bjective the maneuvre actually had was lost in the inner-most
minds of the al lied generals.
In truth, it served no great purpose at all. No strategic o r tactical
goal could possibly have been achieved. It was intended simply to smooth
out a kink in the long line of trenches 
Garnett-Botfield, Alfred Clulow Fitzgerald (I270132)
 
5


Alfred Ingilby GARNETT, second son of the Reverend William GARNETT and Elizabeth Sophia BISHTON, was the brother of William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD. He was 6 years younger than his brother, being born in 1822 at Nantwich.

Alfred Ingilby GARNETT became a Captain in the 8th King's Regiment [of Foot] and served in India, where he acquired (according to George Garnett) a reputation as "a good tiger shot" but was at one time badly mauled by a panther. His statement of service in the Army shows that he entered the service in the rank of ensign in the 8th Regiment on May 13, 1842 at age 20, was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on July 4, 1845 and to Captain on February 21, 1851. He served in the East Indies from August 3, 1846 to September 27, 1853. He embarked for Europe on September 28, 1853.
On August 22, 1856 he was exchanged to the 38th Regiment of Foot.

George Garnett in his family history written in 1910, says that Alfred Ingilby was known by the nickname "Old Alf"---a man "greatly to be liked, but not much to be admired, because he spent all his money (perhaps 10,000-pounds), and for some portion of his life was supported by his brother the Rev. William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD".

From his brother, he rented Haughton Hall (or a portion of it) for 60-pounds a year, where in 1861 he was living along with Captain Charles Hugh KEY (previously Captain of Dragoons, aged 44), Key's wife Catherine (age 30), and their nephew Edward Holloway (age 5). The Hall was also occupied by six house servants, according to the 1861 Census.

Captain Key died the following year (May 3, 1862).

Alfred Ingilby must have married Key's widow Catherine [formerly HOLLOWAY] in about 1863 or 1864.

Their first daughter, Fanny Blanche was born in 1865. They had in all six children, the five after Fanny Blanche being: Jane Sophia (b. 1866); Catherine Lucy (b. 1868); Alfred Egerton (b. 1869); George William (b. 1870); and John Charles Ingilby (b. 1873).

Alfred's mind became deranged in later years and he was confined to an asylum for a short time. But he died at Haughton Hall on February 5, 1889.

Soon after Alfred's death, his brother W. B. GARNETT-BOTFIELD, who was the actual owner of the Haughton Hall Estate, sold it to Ralph Brocklebank, Esq., who became lord of the Manor and principal landowner of the property.

Haughton Hall had been in the Garnett family since Thomas GARNETT purchased it from the Comberback family in about 1786, but Alfred Ingilby was the only GARNETT to have actually occupied it as his own residence.

George Garnett recounts in his family history that Alfred Ingilby always treated him "with great kindness", as did his wife Catherine, who was the widow of Captain Charles Hugh Key. Catherine was described by George as being "a beautiful woman with pleasing manner, who retained her beauty late in life". She died on April 21, 1892 at age 60 at Alpraham, and was buried at Bunbury on April 27, 1892.

Nothing is known about what became of Catherine or the children upon the death of Alfred Ingilby GARNETT. We know only that their daughter Fanny Blanche GARNETT (born in 1865) married Charles Harrison SMITH at Bunbury Church on September 25, 1894 at age 29 years [from the Bunbury Church register].

Alfred Ingilby GARNETT, Catherine [Holloway] GARNETT and Captain Charles Hugh KEY were all buried together in a railed altar-tomb located near that of the Aldersey family in the Bunbury Church cemetery.




Alfred Ingilby GARNETT, second son of the Reverend William GARNETT and
Eliz abeth Sophia BISHTON, was the brother of William Bishton
GARNETT-BOTFIELD. He was 6 years younger than his brother, being born in
1822 at Nantwich.
Alf red Ingilby GARNETT became a Captain in the 8th King's Regiment [of
Foot] and served in India, where he acquired (according to George
Garnett) a reputatio n as "a good tiger shot" but was at one time badly
mauled by a panther. His statement of service in the Army shows that he
entered the service in the ra nk of ensign in the 8th Regiment on May 13,
1842 at age 20, was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on July 4, 1845
and to Captain on February 21, 1851. H e served in the East Indies from
August 3, 1846 to September 27, 1853. He em barked for Europe on
September 28, 1853.
On August 22, 1856 he was exchanged to the 38th Regiment of Foot.
George Garnett in his family history written in 1910, says that Alfred
Ingilby was known by the nickname "Old Alf"---a man " greatly to be liked,
but not much to be admired, because he spent all his mo ney (perhaps
10,000-pounds), and for some portion of his life was supported b y his
brother the Rev. William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD".
From his brother, he rented Haughton Hall (or a portion of it) for
60-pounds a year, where in 1 861 he was living along with Captain Charles
Hugh KEY (previously Captain of Dragoons, aged 44), Key's wife Catherine
(age 30), and their nephew Edward Ho lloway (age 5). The Hall was also
occupied by six house servants, according to the 1861 Census.
Captain Key died the following year (May 3, 1862).
Alfred Ingilby must have married Key's widow Catherine [formerly
HOLLOWAY] in about 1863 or 1864.
Their first daughter, Fanny Blanche was born in 1865. They had in all
six children, the five after Fanny Blanche being: Jane Sophia (b. 18 66);
Catherine Lucy (b. 1868); Alfred Egerton (b. 1869); George William
(b. 1870); and John Charles Ingilby (b. 1873).
Alfred's mind became deranged in later years and he was confined to an
asylum for a short time. But he die d at Haughton Hall on February 5,
1889.
Soon after Alfred's death, his broth er W. B. GARNETT-BOTFIELD, who was
the actual owner of the Haughton Hall Esta te, sold it to Ralph
Brocklebank, Esq., who became lord of the Manor and prin cipal landowner
of the property.
Haughton Hall had been in the Garnett famil y since Thomas GARNETT
purchased it from the Comberback family in about 1786, but Alfred Ingilby
was the only GARNETT to have actually occupied it as his own residence.
George Garnett recounts in his family history that Alfred Ingil by always
treated him "with great kindness", as did his wife Catherine, who w as the
widow of Captain Charles Hugh Key. Catherine was described by George as
being "a beautiful woman with pleasing manner, who retained her beauty
l ate in life". She died on April 21, 1892 at age 60 at Alpraham, and was
buri ed at Bunbury on April 27, 1892.
Nothing is known about what became of Catheri ne or the children upon the
death of Alfred Ingilby GARNETT. We know only th at their daughter Fanny
Blanche GARNETT (born in 1865) married Charles Harris on SMITH at Bunbury
Church on September 25, 1894 at age 29 years [from the Bu nbury Church
register].
Alfred Ingilby GARNETT, Catherine [Holloway] GARNET T and Captain Charles
Hugh KEY were all buried together in a railed altar-tom b located near
that of the Aldersey family in the Bunbury Church cemetery. 
Garnett, Alfred Ingilby (I270008)
 
6


Among other accomplishments, Annie Augusta Aldersey had three children of her own, and took an active role in community life.

Her obituary appeared in the March 14, 1931 issue of the Advertiser:

The Death occurred on Sunday at Church Stretton, of
Mrs A. A. Aldersey, wife of Mr. Thos. Aldersey, of
The Cottage, Shifnal. Deceased had resided in the town some 10 years, and was highly respected, being closely identified with the Mothers' Meeting and other good works, and being especially interested in the care of the inmates of Shifnal Poor-law Institution.

Mrs Aldersey, who had been ill for some months, was getting better, and went to Church Stretton to recuperate. Unfortunately, her condition later grew worse, and on Saturday she became dangerously ill, passing away the following day, as stated. She was a daughter of the late Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield, Decker Hill, Shifnal, and had thus been associated with this district the whole of her life.

She married the second son of Mr. Tom Aldersey, of Aldersey Hall, Chester, and spent some of the first years of her married life with her husband in America. Before coming to reside at Shifnal, Mr. and Mrs. Aldersey were resident for some 20 years at Meole Brace, Shrewsbury, where they were both prominent in the life of the district and church work.

The coffin was brought by motor-hearse from Church Stretton on Tuesday, and lay in the chancel of the Parish Church until Thursday, when the funeral service was conducted by the vicar, assisted by the Rev, Wilfred J. Stanton, a lifelong friend of Mrs. Aldersey's family.
A large number of wreaths were sent by relatives and friends from Meole Brace, as well as local residents and institutions, including one from the Shifnal Mothers' Meeting, many of whose members were present at the graveside. The bearers were Mr. Harry Jones, Mr A. Beamand (Decker Hill), Mr Broom (Beamish), Mr. H. Furniss (chauffeur at Crook Aldersey).

The coffin was followed to the grave by the bereaved husband, Mr. Thos. Aldersey, her daughter, [Sister Gladys Valentine Aldersey] who is a sister of the Community of the Holy Cross, Mr. Walter Aldersey (son), and Mrs. W. Aldersey, Major and Mrs. W. D. Garnett-Botfield, Beamish (brother and sister-in-law), Captain Ralph Aldersey (nephew), Major T. G. N. Bardwell (nephew), Mrs Melvillle Legge (niece, who also represented her father the Rev. Charles R. Garnett-Botfield, prevented by illness from attending), Dr. Melville Legge, Mrs. F. Corbett-Winder (niece), Capt. Corbett-Winder, Col. J.R. Howard McLean (Aston Hall), Mr. H. Revell Phillips, Col. the Hon. F. C. Weld-Forester (Decker Hill), Mrs. Bannister (Caynton), Mrs Mackay, Mr. Jeffe (Meole Brace), and the Matron of the Cottage Hospital. Much sympathy is expressed with the husband, two sons and daughter, who are left to mourn their loss.

Annie Augusta's Will named her husband as the primary beneficiary, and after his death, the residual estate was to go to her sons Francis Garnett Aldersey and Walter Massie Aldersey in equal shares. An income of fifteen pounds a year was bequeathed to her daughter Gladys Valendine Aldersey.


Custom Field:<_FA#> 3 Aug 1856Bunbury, Cheshire, ENGLAND
GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Ann ie
[1857-1831]
Among other accomplishments, Annie Augusta Aldersey had three children of
her own, and took an active role in community life.
Her obituar y appeared in the March 14, 1931 issue of the Advertiser:
The Death occurred o n Sunday at Church Stretton, of Mrs A. A. Aldersey,
wife of Mr. Thos. Alders ey, of
The Cottage, Shifnal. Deceased had resided in the town some 10 years,
and was highly respected, being closely identified with the Mothers'
Meeti ng and other good works, and being especially interested in
the care of the inmates of Shifnal Poor-law Institution.
Mrs Aldersey, who had bee n ill for some months, was getting better, and
went to Church Stretton to rec uperate. Unfortunately, her condition
later grew worse, and on Saturday she became dangerously ill, passing
away the following day, as stated. She was a daughter of the late Rev.
W. B. Garnett-Botfield, Decker Hill, Shifnal, and had thus been
associated with this district the whole of her life.
She marr ied the second son of Mr. Tom Aldersey, of Aldersey Hall,
Chester, and spent some of the first years of her married life with her
husband in America. Bef ore coming to reside at Shifnal, Mr. and Mrs.
Aldersey were resident for som e 20 years at Meole Brace, Shrewsbury,
where they were both prominent in the life of the district and church
work.
The coffin was brought by motor-hearse from Church Stretton on Tuesday,
and lay in the chancel of the Parish Church until Thursday, when the
funeral service was conducted by the vicar, assiste d by the Rev, Wilfred
J. Stanton, a lifelong friend of Mrs. Aldersey's family . A large number
of wreaths were sent by relatives and friends from Meole Br ace, as well
as local residents and institutions, including one from the Shif nal
Mothers' Meeting, many of whose members were present at the graveside.
The bearers were Mr. Harry Jones, Mr A. Beamand (Decker Hill), Mr Broom
(Be amish), Mr. H. Furniss (chauffeur at Crook Aldersey).
The coffin was followed to the grave by the bereaved husband, Mr. Thos.
Aldersey, her daughter, [Sis ter Gladys Valentine Aldersey] who is a
sister of the Community of the Holy Cross, Mr. Walter Aldersey (son),
and Mrs. W. Aldersey, Major and Mrs. W. D. Garnett-Botfield, Beamish
(brother and sister-in-law), Captain Ralph Alde rsey (nephew), Major T.
G. N. Bardwell (nephew), Mrs Melvillle Legge (niece, who also represented
her father the Rev. Charles R. Garnett-Botfield, preven ted by illness
from attending), Dr. Melville Legge, Mrs. F. Corbett-Wind er (niece),
Capt. Corbett-Winder, Col. J.R. Howard McLean (Aston Hall), Mr. H.
Revell Phillips, Col. the Hon. F. C. Weld-Forester (Decker Hill), Mrs.
B annister (Caynton), Mrs Mackay, Mr. Jeffe (Meole Brace), and the Matron
of t he Cottage Hospital. Much sympathy is expressed with the husband,
two son s and daughter, who are left to mourn their loss.
Annie Augusta's Will named h er husband as the primary beneficiary, and
after his death, the residual est ate was to go to her sons Francis
Garnett Aldersey and Walter Massie Aldersey in equal shares. An income of
fifteen pounds a year was bequeathed to her da ughter Gladys Valendine
Aldersey. 
Garnett-Botfield, Annie Augusta (I270129)
 
7


Ann ACTON, wife of John Jasper GARNETT II [q.v. #16] was the daughter of James ACTON (c. 1786-1821) a farmer of Wardle Hall Farm. Her mother was Charlotte WOODCOCK who is said to have come from Guiden Sutton in Cheshire (and was later buried there).

Ann's father James ACTON died at the young age of just 35 years when Ann was only 3 years old. He was the son of Thomas ACTON and his wife Jane [maiden surname unknown], and had four brothers: Thomas (c. 1772-1840, a farmer), William (c. 1780-1838, a wholesale grocer in Nantwich), Philip (c. 1777-1808), and Samuel (c. 1778-1851)

The ACTON family wall monument and tomb at Bunbury Churchyard commemorates all the members of this family, and includes the coat of arms of the Actons of Aldenham .

This fact suggests that there may be some distant connection to the illustrious family of Aldenham Actons---a family that counts among its members a string of 21 barons, a Cardinal of the Catholic Church, a Prime Minister of Naples, a celebrated English historian (Edward Gibbons), a Prince of Naples, a whole line of admirals in the Italian navy and many other prominent citizens.

However, in point of fact, the Actons of Wardle Hall were not at all related to the Aldenhams. Instead, they were actually descended from the ACTONs of Alderley and a copy of their family pedigree can be found in George Ormerod's History of the County Palatine of Chester.

It is possible that the stone cutters who created the Bunbury monuments may simply have incorrectly assumed kinship with the Aldenham Actons, and thereby misused the Arms on the Acton tombs.

After James Acton's death, Charlotte left the infant Ann in the care of a spinster aunt, and went off to marry a Mr. Thomas Hassal---"a man beneath her socially" according to her grandson George Garnett.

Ann Acton was a woman of delicate constitution and died November 6, 1848 at the young age of 30. She suffered from "general decline" and probably consumption or tuberculosis.

George Garnett (who was just past 3-years old when his mother died) recalls seeing her once: "she was then in bed, and raised herself up to look at me...a lovely woman with a beautiful complexion...and eyes like Lucy Butler [George Garnett's niece]".

Ann [ACTON] Garnett bore three children---the first son, Richard Craven Garnett was born in 1843 when Ann was 25-years of age. A daughter, Elizabeth Ann "Lizzie" Butler arrived in 1844, and another son named George Garnett was born the following year (1845).

She was buried November 14, 1848 at Acton by Nantwich.


Custom Field:<_FA#> 14 Nov 1848Acton by Nantwich, by T. Storr [clergyman]
ACTO N, Ann
[1818-1848]
Ann ACTON, wife of John Jasper GARNETT II was the daughter of James ACTON
(c. 1786-1821) a farmer of Wardle Hall Farm. Her mother was C harlotte
WOODCOCK who is said to have come from Guiden Sutton in Cheshire (an d was
later buried there).
Ann's father James ACTON died at the young age of just 35 years when Ann
was only 3 years old. He was the son of Thomas ACTON and his wife Jane
[maiden surname unknown], and had four brothers: Thomas (c. 1772-1840,
a farmer), William (c. 1780-1838, a wholesale grocer in Nantw ich),
Philip (c. 1777-1808), and Samuel (c. 1778-1851)
The ACTON family wal l monument and tomb at Bunbury Churchyard
commemorates all the members of thi s family, and includes the coat of
arms of the Actons of Aldenham .
This fa ct suggests that there may be some distant connection to the
illustrious fami ly of Aldenham Actons---a family that counts among its
members a string of 21 barons, a Cardinal of the Catholic Church, a
Prime Minister of Naples, a c elebrated English historian (Edward
Gibbons), a Prince of Naples, a whole l ine of admirals in the Italian
navy and many other prominent citizens.
Howev er, in point of fact, the Actons of Wardle Hall were not at all
related to t he Aldenhams. Instead, they were actually descended from the
ACTONs of Alder ley and a copy of their family pedigree can be found in
George Ormerod's Hist ory of the County Palatine of Chester.
It is possible that the stone cutters who created the Bunbury monuments
may simply have incorrectly assumed kinship with the Aldenham Actons, and
thereby misused the Arms on the Acton tombs.
After James Acton's death, Charlotte left the infant Ann in the care of
a sp inster aunt, and went off to marry a Mr. Thomas Hassal---"a man
beneath her s ocially" according to her grandson George Garnett.
Ann Acton was a woman of de licate constitution and died November 6, 1848
at the young age of 30. She su ffered from "general decline" and
probably consumption or tuberculosis.
Geo rge Garnett (who was just past 3-years old when his mother died)
recalls see ing her once: "she was then in bed, and raised herself up to
look at me...a lovely woman with a beautiful complexion...and eyes like
Lucy Butler [George Garnett's niece]".
Ann [ACTON] Garnett bore three children---the first son, Richard Craven
Garnett was born in 1843 when Ann was 25-years of age. A daug hter,
Elizabeth Ann "Lizzie" Butler arrived in 1844, and another son named
George Garnett was born the following year (1845).
She was buried November 1 4, 1848 at Acton by Nantwich. 
Acton, Ann (I269590)
 
8


Beriah BOTFIELD II was the cousin of the Reverend William Bishton GARNETT. His death on August 7, 1863 resulted in the inheritance by William Bishton Garnett of the estate at Decker Hill, Shifnal as well as other holdings accumulated by Beriah's uncle William BOTFIELD and the right to use the Botfield name in conjunction with that of Garnett.

Beriah BOTFIELD was born at Earl's Ditton, Salop on March 5, 1807. He was the only child of Beriah BOTFIELD (one of the three Botfield brothers who amassed vast holdings in mines, iron foundaries and real estate in Shropshire). His mother was Charlotte WITHERING, daughter of William WITHERING, a medical doctor residing at Edgbaston near Birmingham.

The younger Beriah Botfield was educated at Harrow and Christ Church Oxford, receiving a B.A. in 1828 and an M.A. in 1847. There, he developed a life long interest in the classics, antiquities, geology and botany, books, genealogy and politics---interests which he pursued for the rest of his life.

In 1831, Beriah Botfield was appointed Sheriff of Northamptonshire. In this capacity, Botfield was one of the public officials who discovered and brought to trial the illegal bribery and vote-buying charges leveled against two of the incumbent Members of Parliament for Northants and Ludlow--Clive and Alcock.

In the 1840 by-election called to fill Alcock's parliamentary seat, Beriah Botfield stood for election as the Conservative candidate and won the seat. By this point, he had become a man of considerable fortune and influence in Shropshire, largely as a result of his immense inheritance from his father and uncles. The Botfields' wealth was drawn from the local Shropshire iron and coal industries, in which they controlled a number of blast furnaces and collieries, employing thousands of men and youths throughout the area.

It was said by Botfield's future father- in-law, Sir Baldwin Leighton, that Botfield was "by far the richest commoner in Shropshire" [Leighton's diary, entry dated August 8, 1858, Loton Hall manuscripts].

In the election of 1840, Botfield beat the Whig opponent (G. G. de Larpent) by 194 votes to 160. And in the subsequent general election of 1841, Botfield together with another new Conservative candidate, James Ackers of Heath House, easily defeated the Whig, Salwey, by 222 and 219 votes to 156.

Botfield continued to represent the riding of Ludlow in parliament until July 23, 1847. He was out of parliament for ten years, being re-elected again in 1857 and continuing as M.P. until his death six years later.

Botfield was an active supporter of horse racing meets held at Shrewsbury. Stewards of these race meets were drawn exclusively from the ranks of the local nobility and gentry.

County and borough M.P.s were expected to serve as stewards at least once and it was customary for a member of a county family, once he had come of age, to be a steward of the various Shropshire race meets. Beriah Botfield (as M.P. for Ludlow from 1840-47) was steward of the Shrewsbury Races in 1839 [from the Salop Journal, June 19, 1839]. The support of the local M.P.s normally took the form of a cup or a financial contribution to an existing stake or plate.

Botfield was required, under the terms of his inheritance from his uncle William Botfield, to live at Decker Hill for at least six months a year---which he is said to have detested [from Hatfield House Manuscript of the 3rd. Marquis of Salisbury, letter from Lord Powis to Lord Salisbury dated Dec. 22, 1879].

Beriah Botfield did not get married until late in life (at the age of 50). His obituary notice published in Gentleman's Magazine [November, 1863 edition] hints that there was an "unfortunate liaison" (probably with someone of a lower social station in life ) which he entered into around 1828 (at age 21) and which continued for a period of 28 years.

On October 21, 1858 Beriah Botfield married Isabella LEIGHTON at Alderbury. She was the second daughter of Sir Baldwin LEIGHTON, Bart., the M.P. for South Shropshire. The Leightons were members of the Shropshire aristocracy. Several of this family stood as conservative candidates for parliament, the most controversial of these being Sir Baldwin Leighton. Beriah and Isabella Botfield had no children.

Besides his political career and interests in horse racing, Beriah Botfield was a well-known antiquarian, classical scholar, historical, genealogist, and bibliophile. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (F.R.S.) on January 17, 1839, and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (F.S.A.) later in 1839.

He belonged to a number of scholarly clubs (including the Abbotsford, Bannatyne, Maitland, Roxburghe Clubs and also the Surtees Society), and he edited books for all of these organizations. He even set up a private printing press at his own principal residence (Norton Hall) where he printed and published a number of limited edition books, including: Journal of a Tour Through the Highlands of Scotland (1830); Bibliotheca Bearneiana (1848); Notes of Cathedral Libraries of England (1849); Prefaces to first Editions of Greek and Roman Classics (1861).

Beriah Botfield also compiled a history and genealogy of the BOTFIELD and BOTEVYLE family, entitled Stemmata Botevilliana (written in 1843 and republished in 1858).

Beriah Botfield died on August 7, 1863 at his London residence, 5 Grosvenor Square.

The property which he had inherited from his uncle, William Botfield, reverted to William Bishton GARNETT at the time of his death. The rest of Beriah Botfield's estate was left to his widow, Isabella Leighton Botfield, and also to the second son of the Marquis of Bath who was related to the Botfield family through the BOTEVILE-THYNNES family of Longleat in Wiltshire.

In addition to inheriting the property at Decker Hill, Shifnal, William Bishton GARNETT was also granted the right to use the name of BOTFIELD in addition to that of the name GARNETT [by Royal License dated October 3, 1963]. From that point onward, this other branch of the GARNETT family became known under the name of GARNETT-BOTFIELD.

Beriah Botfield, dying as he did without heirs and successors, was the last in the line of the BOTFIELD pedigree. After the death of Beriah Botfield II, the name of BOTFIELD became extinct, except for the right granted for its continued use by the GARNETT-BOTFIELD family. That name too became extinct with the death of William McLean GARNETT- BOTFIELD [q.v. G-B 4] sometime in the 1950s.


__________________________________
Sources of information:

Allibone's Dictionary of English Literature, edited by John Foster Kirk, published by Lippincott (1891) page 181.

Burke's Landed Gentry, 1853 edition.

Burke's Authorized Arms, 1971, pages 4-5.

Men of the Reign, edited by Thomas Humphry Ward, published by George Routledge & Son, New York City, 1885, page 99.

Modern English Biography, by Frederic Boase, volume 1, published by Netherton & Worth, London, 1892.

The Gentlemen's Magazine, obituary of Beriah Botfield, published in the November, 1863 edition.

Victorian History of Shropshire, volume II,
page 181; volume III , pages 314, 337-9



BOTFIELD, Beriah
[1807-1863]
Beriah BOTFIELD II was the cousin of the Reveren d William Bishton
GARNETT. His death on August 7, 1863 resulted in the inher itance by
William Bishton Garnett of the estate at Decker Hill, Shifnal as we ll as
other holdings accumulated by Beriah's uncle William BOTFIELD and the
right to use the Botfield name in conjunction with that of Garnett.
Beriah BOTFIELD was born at Earl's Ditton, Salop on March 5, 1807. He
was the only child of Beriah BOTFIELD (one of the three Botfield brothers
who amassed vast holdings in mines, iron foundaries and real estate in
Shropshire). His moth er was Charlotte WITHERING, daughter of William
WITHERING, a medical doctor residing at Edgbaston near Birmingham.
The younger Beriah Botfield was educate d at Harrow and Christ Church
Oxford, receiving a B.A. in 1828 and an M.A. i n 1847. There, he
developed a life long interest in the classics, antiquitie s, geology and
botany, books, genealogy and politics---interests which he pur sued for
the rest of his life.
In 1831, Beriah Botfield was appointed Sherif f of Northamptonshire. In
this capacity, Botfield was one of the public offi cials who discovered
and brought to trial the illegal bribery and vote-buying charges leveled
against two of the incumbent Members of Parliament for North ants and
Ludlow--Clive and Alcock.
In the 1840 by-election called to fill Al cock's parliamentary seat,
Beriah Botfield stood for election as the Conserva tive candidate and won
the seat. By this point, he had become a man of consi derable fortune and
influence in Shropshire, largely as a result of his immen se inheritance
from his father and uncles. The Botfields' wealth was drawn f rom the
local Shropshire iron and coal industries, in which they controlled a
number of blast furnaces and collieries, employing thousands of men and
yo uths throughout the area.
It was said by Botfield's future father-in-law, Sir Baldwin Leighton,
that Botfield was "by far the richest commoner in Shropshir e"
[Leighton's diary, entry dated August 8, 1858, Loton Hall manuscripts].
In the election of 1840, Botfield beat the Whig opponent (G. G. de
Larpent) b y 194 votes to 160. And in the subsequent general election of
1841, Botfield together with another new Conservative candidate, James
Ackers of Heath Hous e, easily defeated the Whig, Salwey, by 222 and 219
votes to 156.
Botfield c ontinued to represent the riding of Ludlow in parliament until
July 23, 1847. He was out of parliament for ten years, being re-elected
again in 1857 and continuing as M.P. until his death six years later.
Botfield was an active sup porter of horse racing meets held at
Shrewsbury. Stewards of these race meet s were drawn exclusively from the
ranks of the local nobility and gentry.
Co unty and borough M.P.s were expected to serve as stewards at least once
and i t was customary for a member of a county family, once he had come
of age, t o be a steward of the various Shropshire race meets. Beriah
Botfield (as M.P . for Ludlow from 1840-47) was steward of the Shrewsbury
Races in 1839 [from the Salop Journal, June 19, 1839]. The support of
the local M.P.s normally took the form of a cup or a financial
contribution to an existing stake or pl ate.
Botfield was required, under the terms of his inheritance from his uncle
William Botfield, to live at Decker Hill for at least six months a
year--- which he is said to have detested [from Hatfield House Manuscript
of the 3rd . Marquis of Salisbury, letter from Lord Powis to Lord
Salisbury dated Dec. 22, 1879].
Beriah Botfield did not get married until late in life (at the age of
50). His obituary notice published in Gentleman's Magazine [November,
1863 edition] hints that there was an "unfortunate liaison" (probably
with s omeone of a lower social station in life ) which he entered into
around 1828 (at age 21) and which continued for a period of 2 
Botfield, Beriah (I270154)
 
9


Charles Sidney GARNETT-BOTFIELD's military records show that he was born on October 5, 1887 and that he was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the Bedfordshire Regiment.

Captain Charles Sidney GARNETT-BOTFIELD of the Bedfordshire Regiment died of wounds received in action at Boulogne, France on December 14, 1914. [Source: Army Officers Records of War Deaths, 1914-1920]

GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Charles Sidney
[1887-1914]
Charles Sidney GARNETT-BOTFIELD' s military records show that he was born
on October 5, 1887 and that he was c ommissioned as a Lieutenant in the
Bedfordshire Regiment. He was made a seco nd lieutenant in the same
regiment on February 8, 1908.
Captain Charles Sidn ey GARNETT-BOTFIELD of the Bedfordshire Regiment died
of wounds received in a ction at Boulogne, France on December 14, 1914.
[Source: Army Officers Reco rds of War Deaths, 1914-1920]. His body was
subsequently buried at Philip an d James Churchyard, Moreton, Shropshire,
with internment in plot identified a s New Ground 9.20. [Source: The
Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records] 
Garnett-Botfield, Charles Sidney (I270226)
 
10


Charles SLINGSBY [later to become Sir Charles SLINGSBY, the tenth baronet of Nova Scotia] was born on August 22, 1824 at Loftus Hall, near Knaresborough.

His mother was Emma Margaret ATKINSON], the grand daughter of George GARNETT of Nantwich. His father was Charles SLINGSBY owner of Loftus Hall, and the second son of Sir Thomas Turner SLINGSBY [the eighth holder of the baronetcy].

With the death of Sir Thomas Turner SLINGSBY, the title and family estate at Scriven Park, Yorkshire, had passed to his eldest son, also named Sir Thomas SLINGSBY [the ninth baronet].

On February 2, 1835 this Sir Thomas SLINGSBY died unmarried and left the peerage title along with the Scriven estate to his young nephew, Charles SLINGSBY. [Charles' father, the next in line of succession, had died two years previously, in May, 1832].

At the remarkable age of just eleven, Charles SLINGSBY thus became the tenth Baronet of Nova Scotia and owner of all the Slingsby lands and the great estate house at Scriven Park (known as the Redhouse) built in 1606 by his direct ancestor, Sir Henry SLINGSBY.

Charles Slingsby inherited the taste of both his father and uncle for hunting and "the chase".

At the age of 14, young Charles found himself at the head of a pack of harriers. He was a keen rider and sportsman--- pastimes in which he could indulge himself by virtue of his wealth, social position, and in not being obliged to attend public school as a boy.

A brief regimental career was a natural choice resulting from his interests in riding and sportsmanship. In 1843 at age 19, Sir Charles SLINGSBY was gazetted as a Cornet in the Horse Guards (known as the "Blues"), promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in 1845, and left the service in 1847.

He continued his lifelong interest in hunting and horsemanship, breeding his own pack of harriers and fox-hounds and acquiring a stable of horses.

In 1853, after ten years of managing his own kennel and stable, he was offered the honorary post of Master of the York and Ainsty Hunt...a position he held until his untimely and fateful death just fifteen years later.

As a Master of the Hunt, Sir Charles SLINGSBY is said to have been amply qualified. He possessed all the attributes requisite for this honored office---patience, discrimination, perfect self-control, and determination.

From an article in the March, 1869 edition of Baily's Magazine of Sport and Pastimes, we have this description of him:

"Sir Charles Slingsby was a very remarkable man---a good and charitable neighbour, a kind landlord, residing nearly the whole year at his seat, Scriven Park: he was loved by rich and poor.

Keen about all sport; could break a pointer, train a hawk, shoot game or pigeons. But to see him in his glory, where he was most known, was with his hounds. His manner with them was a lesson to most huntsmen: he never lost his head or his temper. Hounds had great confidence in him...

His very gentlemanlike manner towards his field will never be forgotten: no hasty expression escaped him. He rode well to his hounds and was showing very good sport. The York and Ainsty pack belong to the country. Sir Charles Slingsby had had the management of them for fifteen years, and bred them with great care. They are persevering, quick, close hunters."
[Baily's Magazine, March 1869, page 206]

With the farmers in the area, Sir Charles Slingsby was very popular---his quiet demeanour and non-interference with the field made his leadership of the York and Ainsty a highly regarded position among the hunters and landowners alike.

During his twenty years as a local landowner and as Master of the Hunt, Slingsby probably lived much the lifestyle of the idle rich. His time was consumed largely in pursuing the noble life of a sportsman, a gentleman landowner, and as a breeder of prize winning hounds and horses.

In the Great Wetherby Hound Show of August, 1868, three of Slingsby's hounds won top prizes [Nestor, Nosegay and Novelty].

It was not only on the hunting field that Slingsby gained local notoriety, but also on the racetracks at Doncaster, Malton, Thirsk, and the derbys at Epsom, where be distinguished himself as both a breeder and a rider. [Baily's Magazine, February, 1864, pages 271-2].

He was active in politics in a staunchly Conservative way, and campaigned on behalf of the Tory candidates for Knaresborough and West Riding. He was "essentially a Yorkshireman in his tastes and habits...a liberal landlord, a thorough sportsman, and a true friend." [The Gentleman's Magazine, March, 1869 vol. 226, pages 500-501].

It was through sport that Sir Charles Slingsby gained some local renown---but, ironically, it was also by sport that he came to his tragic and fateful end.

Tragic death by drowning...

"Accidentally drowned, by the upsetting of a ferry boat!" is the concise epitaph that headlined Sir Charles Slingsby's Obituary Memoir in the March, 1869 edition of The Gentleman's Magazine [pages 500 and 501].

This was an event as dramatic and as sad as any ever recorded in the history of sport.

It took place on the morning of February 4, 1869. The York and Ainsty foxhounds together with a noble entourage of riders, assembled shortly after eleven o'clock at Stainley House, situated half-way between Harrogate and Ripon.

The weather that day was fine, as "mild as a morning in May", and the congregated field of horsemen was large. In addition to Sir Charles mounted on his horse "Saltfish", the party included Sir George Wombwell (one of the "gallant Six Hundred" whose ride into the Valley of Death at Balaklava was immortalized in heroic poetry) and many other members of the local aristocracy.

Present too were Lord Lascelles, Viscount Downe, Mr Edmund Robinson of York, the Honorable Henry Molyneux, Captain Key, Captain Caryl Molyneux (of the 10th Hussars), and Mr. White (of the 15th Hassars).

No fox was encountered until the party reached Monkton Whin, but once the chase started, the fox gave dogs and riders a hearty run of an hour's duration heading finally in the direction of Newby Hall, the residence of Lady Mary Vyner.

At that point, the fox took to the river Ure, opposite the Hall, with the hungry pack in full pursuit. The river, swollen by recent rains, was impassable although several riders tried to cross it at the ford some distance up stream.

Slingsby and about fifteen or sixteen of his more adventurous companions took a different course.

Galloping to Newby Hall, they command- eered a ferry boat together with the gardener of Newby Hall and his son (the Warreners by name) to pilot them across the turbid water.

Sir Charles along with William Orveys, his kennel huntsman, E. Lloyd, Edmund Robinson, the two Molyneux brothers, Clare Vyner, Captain Mussenden, Captain Key, Mr. White and Sir George Wombwell hastily scrambled into the boat, all in high spirits, taking no note of the proper number that could go across the river in safety.

Danger never entered their minds. Eleven horses and thirteen men pushed off from the embankment.

Within moments of leaving shore, water started to pour into the boat, which was riding low in the water from the overload.

A third of the way across the river, the horses frightened by the incoming water, began to agitate about, and the boat lurched and bobbed from side to side.

Captain Key jumped from the boat before it capsized and safely swam to shore.

"Saltfish" in panic jumped overboard, pulling Sir Charles after him. The horse got caught up in the chains, but Sir Charles landed clear.

The boat pitched to one side then flipped over, hurling all passengers into the turbulent waters.

Slingsby was one of the first to rise to the surface. Clear of the boat, he struck out for the shore, his faithful horse Saltfish paddling like a dog at his side.

Slingsby appeared to swim strongly for some strokes, then suddenly his exertions ceased and he sank beneath the surface not far from shore, probably seized with a cramp.

Mr. Vyner pulled himself on top of the overturned boat and was able to drag Sir George Wombwell (who could not swim) out of the swirling current, as well as Captain Mussenden, who had been cut on the head by a blow from one of the horses.

Captain Caryl Molyneux and also Mr. White were able to scramble onto the boat and so saved themselves.

From the shore, a small party of helpless spectators could only watch in horror. Horse whips were knotted together in a vain attempt to throw out a life line to their drowning companions.

Orveys, Mr. Edmund Robinson, and the two Warreners sank from sight, never to be seen alive again.

By late afternoon the body of Sir Charles Slingsby was found some three hundred yards down-river from the site of the accident.

So ends the sad tale of how Slingsby fell, in the heat of the chase that he loved so well--- a tragedy headlined in news accounts throughout the county of Yorkshire for months afterwards, and which inspired the pamphleteers and ballad-mongers to do their worst.

One such piece of heroic doggerel, in eighteen heart-rending stanzas, by balladeer R.E. Egerton-Warburton [appearing in print in the April, 1869 edition of Baily's Magazine] is reproduced below.

Newby Ferry.
__________________________________________
By R.E. Egerton-Warburton.

The morning was mild as a morning in May,
Slingsby on Saltfish was out for the day;
Though the Ure was rain-swollen, the pack dashed in,
Follow'd close on the fox they had found at the Whin.

Swept o'er the weir, they were running full cry,
But too deep was the ford for the horsemen to try;
So to Newby they sped, like an army dispers'd
Hoping each in his heart to be there with the first.

Lloyd, Robinson, Orvis, and Slingsby the brace,
Pressing on to that ferry to find there a grave;
Little thought the four comrades when, rivals in pace,
With such glee they spurr'd on that they rode a death-race.

'The pack far ahead, and the river past,
With no one to cheer them and no one to cast,
Quickly, good ferrymen, haul to the shore,
Bad luck to your craft if we catch 'em no more!'

Thus shouting, old Orvis leapt down to the bank,
And with Lloyd alongside led his horse to the plank;
There stood they, dismounted, their hands on the rein,
Never more to set foot in the stirrup again!

Eleven good men in the laden boat,
Eleven good steeds o'er the ferry float;
Alas! ere their ferrymen's task was done,
Two widows were weeping o'er father and son!

So sudden, what meaneth that piercing cry
Wrung from those they had left on the bank hard by?
The shadow of death seem'd to pass like a cloud
O'er the stream----on its brink, terror-struck, stood the crowd.

The chestnut is overboard---Slingsby now,
To his bridle-rein clinging, hangs over the prow;
The barque, overburden'd bends down on her side,
Heels o'er, and her freight is engulf'd in the tide.

In that moment an age seem'd to intervene
Ere Vyner was first on the surface seen;
The plank scarcely won ere his arm he extends
To reach and to rescue his sinking friends.

Whips knotted fast in the haste of despair,
Reach not the doom'd who were drowning there;
Swimmers undauntedly breasted the wave,
Till themselves were nigh sunk in their efforts to save.

Robinson---he who can bird-like skim
O'er fence and o'er fallow---unpractis'd to swim,
Powerless of arm, must now trust in this need
To his own stout heart and his own good steed.

Slowly that horse from the river's bed,
Still back'd by his rider, uprais'd his head;
Overtax'd in his stride as he cross'd the deep plough,
Oh! that strength had been spar'd for the death-struggle now.

Fearless and calm, as if hounds were in sight,
Sat his rider, unmov'd, in the saddle upright,
One moment, then heard they his heartrending scream,
As down, still unseated, he sank in the stream.

Slingsby meanwhile from the waters rose,
Where deepest and strongest the mid-current flows;
Manfully stemming its onward course,
He struck for the boat with his failing force.

Then feebly one arm was uplifted, in vain,
Striving to snatch at the chestnut's mane,
For that faithful steed, through the rolling tide,
Had swum like a dog to his master's side.

At length by the stream, he can buffet no more,
Borne, bleeding and pale, to the farther shore,
There, as the Slingbys had ofttimes lain,
Lay the last of that House in his harness slain!

Sprung from a knightly and time-honour'd race,
Pride of thy county! and chief of her chase!
Though a stranger, not less in his sorrow sincere,
Who now weeps o'er the close of thy gallant career.

Let Yorkshire, while England re-echoes her wail,
Bereft of her bravest, record the sad tale,
How Slingsby of Scriven at Newby fell,
In the heat of that chase which he lov'd so well.

[Baily's Magazine of Sports and Pastimes,
Volume 227, April, 1869, pages 239-241].


Death, the Gate of Life...

Today at Redhouse, the great manor house of the Slingsby family at Scriven Park, remenants of Sir Charles Slingsby and his fateful conclusion to the family line of Slingsby, still remain.

The house, though turned into a preparatory school since 1902, maintains relics of the Slingsby dynasty. Among these, a silver statuette of Sir Charles's horse, Saltfish, which caused the accident at Newby Ferry by jumping overboard pulling Sir Charles with him.

Sir Charles's hatchment hangs on the south wall of the Slingsby chapel at Redhouse, his arms resplendent above the bold motto : Mors Janua Vitae [Death the Gate of Life].

With the death of Sir Charles Slingsby, the last male heir in the direct line of succession of the Slingsbys, the family's title of Baronet became extinct.

The family property and holdings at Scriven Park passed to Charles' sister, Emma Louisa Catherine SLINGSBY---who had married Captain Thomas Leslie in July, 1860. They jointly assumed by Royal License dated April 9, 1869, the additional surname and arms of SLINGSBY and took up residence at the Redhouse estate soon afterwards.

Early in March , 1869 an aucton was held at Scriven to sell off the stable stock and equipment of Sir Charles.

A description of this auction is recorded in the April issue of Baily's Magazine:

At Scriven the attendance was not so great; but there were some few substantial men from all quarters of England and Scotland determined to buy Rosamond, a bay mare, bred by Sir G. Cholmondeley.

She carried the late Sir Charles Slingsby five seasons most brilliantly. Her limbs had not a scratch on them: short legs, good shoulders, most perfect formation of back and hind quarters, good head, and game expression, looked thoroughbred, and able to carry 13 stone. She was knocked down to Mr. Bucannon for
430 gs.

Snow fell, and silence for a moment prevailed. The stud was not a very good one. A grey horse, a charming light-weight hunter, was bought by a 'non-jumping local' for 310 gs.

The brothers Vyner bought two or three nice horses, at not very unreasonable prices. Many of the old screws, saddles, bridles, &c., were bought by men who were anxious to have something that had belonged to "Sir Charles".

[Baily's Magazine, April, 1869, page 260]

Emma Louisa Catherine Slingsby died childless on June 24, 1899, and under the terms of Sir Charles' will, the estate at Scriven then passed to their cousin, the Reverend Charles ATKINSON, Rector of the church at Kirby-Sigston, and the great grandson of George Garnett of Nantwich.

The Reverend Charles ATKINSON assumed the surname and arms of SLINGSBY by Royal Licence on December 24, 1899 and became owner of the lands and manor house at Scriven.

Like his cousin Sir Charles Slingsby, the Reverend Charles Atkinson Slingsby developed a taste for sport, and ironically he too came to his end in a fateful accident brought about by a crafty fox. He broke his neck in the hunting field near Thickpenny Farm, half a mile from Redhouse, on a bleak winters day in November, 1912.

Dark-shadowed Fate continued to plague the descendents of the Slingsbys. Of the five children of the Reverend Charles Atkinson Slingsby, none succeeded in having off-spring and heirs.

The first son, Lieutenant Charles Henry Reynard SLINGSBY, married a widowed American woman named Dorothy Morgan WARNER of Providence, Rhode Island. They unsuccessfully tried to have children. Mrs. Dorothy Slingsby---left frustrated by a miscarriage---anonymously advertised in American newspapers for a baby to adopt.

The Slingsby couple subsequently secured [through illegal payment], the baby son of an American schoolgirl [Lillian Anderson] and a chauffeur [Paul Colvin] which had been born in San Francisco and which they tried to pass off as their own son and heir.

This ruse was quickly challenged by other members of the Slingsby family, and taken to trial. The scandal that followed, headlined in the papers on both sides of the Atlantic as the "Slingsby Baby Case" soiled the family's name and burdened their fortunes with exhorbitant court costs.

The Redhouse and much, if not all of the family estate at Scriven was put up for sale. Lt. Commander Charles Henry Reynard Slingsby died childless and without heirs on March 29, 1941 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

The second son of the Reverend Charles Atkinson Slingsby, Thomas William SLINGSBY [born March 6, 1876] married Dorothy May HOLE on August 7, 1925 and died without children.

A third son, Alan Peter SLINGSBY
[born March 16, 1885] married Vera CATHCART of Mowbray House, Ripon on August 10, 1914. They also had no children.

A fourth son, John SLINGSBY [born February 11, 1898] became a midshipman in the Royal Navy and was drowned aboard the H.M.S. Formidable on January 1, 1915. [This was the fourth known death by drowning in the history of the Slingsby family].

The only daughter of Reverend Charles Atkinson Slingsby, Francis Dorothy [Slingsby] WILLIAMSON married William Hopper Williamson on June 12, 1901. Likewise, no children or heirs resulted from this marrige.

So ends the colourful biography of the heroic...the somewhat scandalous...and the unfailingly tragic dynasty of the SLINGSBYs---a family driven by fate and their own failings into doomed extinction.





Charles SLINGSBY [later to become Sir Charles SLINGSBY, the tenth baronet
of Nova Scotia] was born on August 22, 1824 at Loftus Hall, near
Knaresborough.
His mother was Emma Margaret ATKINSON], the grand daughter of George
GARN ETT of Nantwich. His father was Charles SLINGSBY owner of Loftus
Hall, and the second son of Sir Thomas Turner SLINGSBY [the eighth holder
of the barone tcy].
With the death of Sir Thomas Turner SLINGSBY, the title and family
es tate at Scriven Park, Yorkshire, had passed to his eldest son, also
named Si r Thomas SLINGSBY [the ninth baronet].
On February 2, 1835 this Sir Thomas SLI NGSBY died unmarried and left the
peerage title along with the Scriven estat e to his young nephew, Charles
SLINGSBY. [Charles' father, the next in line of succession, had died
two years previously, in May, 1832].
At the remarka ble age of just eleven, Charles SLINGSBY thus became the
tenth Baronet of No va Scotia and owner of all the Slingsby lands and the
great estate house at S criven Park (known as the Redhouse) built in 1606
by his direct ancestor, Si r Henry SLINGSBY.
Charles Slingsby inherited the taste of both his father and uncle for
hunting and "the chase".
At the age of 14, young Charles found himself at the head of a pack of
harriers. He was a keen rider and sportsman --- pastimes in which he
could indulge himself by virtue of his wealth, socia l position, and in
not being obliged to attend public school as a boy.
A bri ef regimental career was a natural choice resulting from his
interests in ri ding and sportsmanship. In 1843 at age 19, Sir Charles
SLINGSBY was gazette d as a Cornet in the Horse Guards (known as the
"Blues"), promoted to the ra nk of Lieutenant in 1845, and left the
service in 1847.
He continued his lif elong interest in hunting and horsemanship, breeding
his own pack of harrier s and fox-hounds and acquiring a stable of
horses.
In 1853, after ten yea rs of managing his own kennel and stable, he was
offered the honorary post o f Master of the York and Ainsty Hunt...a
position he held until his untimely and fateful death just fifteen years
later.
As a Master of the Hunt, Sir Ch arles SLINGSBY is said to have been amply
qualified. He possessed all the att ributes requisite for this honored
office---patience, discrimination, perfect self-control, and
determination.
From an article in the March, 1869 edition of Baily's Magazine of Sport
and Pastimes, we have this description of him:
"Sir Charles Slingsby was a very remarkable man---a good and charitable
neig hbour, a kind landlord, residing nearly the whole year at his seat,
Scriven P ark: he was loved by rich and poor.
Keen about all sport; could break a poin ter, train a hawk, shoot game or
pigeons. But to see him in his glory, where he was most known, was with
his hounds. His manner with them was a lesson t o most huntsmen: he
never lost his head or his temper. Hounds had great con fidence in him...
His very gentlemanlike manner towards his field will never b e forgotten:
no hasty expression escaped him. He rode well to his hounds an d was
showing very good sport. The York and Ainsty pack belong to the
coun try. Sir Charles Slingsby had had the management of them for
fifteen years, and bred them with great care. They are persevering,
quick, close hunters."
[Baily's Magazine, March 1869, page 206]
With the farmers in the area, Sir Charles Slingsby was very
popular---his quiet demeanour and non-interference with the field made
his leadership of the York and Ainsty a highly regarded p osition among
the hunters and landowners alike.
During his twenty years as a local landowner and as Master of the Hunt,
Slingsby probably lived much th e lifestyle of the idle rich. His time
was consumed largely in pursuing the noble life of a sportsman, a
gentleman landowner, and as a breeder of prize winning hounds and horses.
In the Great Wetherby 
Slingsby, Charles (I269566)
 
11


Charlotte Isabel LEACH was born in about the year 1850 at Thornton-in-Lonsdale, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of the Vicar of Thornton-in-Lonsdale, the Reverend Thomas LEACH [q.v. #18] and of his wife Anne Elizabeth LODGE [q.v. #19].
Charlotte Isabel LEACH grew up at the Vicarage in Thornton-in-Lonsdale where she likely experienced a serene, secure and religious up-bringing. She had five brothers and sisters: Thomas Jr. (born circa 1848), Edmund Foxcroft (born circa 1852), Felix Henry (born circa 1854), Richard Ernest (born circa 1857), and Gertrude (born circa 1859).

On July 20, 1871 she married Richard Craven GARNETT [q.v. #8] who was an Anglican priest at Manchester Cathedral. He had probably met Charlotte through her father, a fellow clergyman in the Church of England. They were married at Thornton- in-Lonsdale. Witnesses at the wedding included Charlotte's sister Gertrude and her brother Thomas as well as Richard Craven Garnett's brother George and his sister Elizabeth Ann "Lizzie" Garnett.

Charlotte and the Reverend Richard Craven Garnett took up residence first at Calveley-under-Bunbury where he was curate until 1873. At Bunbury, Charlotte gave birth to the first two of their children:
Anne Craven Garnett and John Jasper Garnett (named after both his grand father and great grandfather).

Both of these first two Garnett children died in June 1879 within weeks of each other from an outbreak of diphtheria.

In 1873, the Reverend Garnett became Rector of Delamere where he remained until 1889. At Delamere the rest of the Garnett children were born---Kate (August 11, 1874); Marion (October 2, 1875); Craven (August 5, 1877); George Edmund (March 12, 1880); Hubert (November 28, 1881); Charlotte Octavia (January 29, 1883); Acton (August 22, 1884); Ruth (April 11, 1885); and Isobel (November 28, 1888).

The Reverend Garnett became Vicar of Settle, North Yorkshire in 1889 where the children grew up and went to school.

At the young age of only 43-years, Charlotte (LEACH) Garnett died on April 6, 1893 from a sudden bout of influenza, pneumonia and acute rheumatic endocarditis. She was buried in the church yard at Settle.


Charlotte Isabel LEACH was born in about the year 1850 at
Thornton-in-Lonsdal e, Yorkshire. She was the daughter of the Vicar of
Thornton-in-Lonsdale, th e Reverend Thomas LEACH and of his wife Anne
Elizabeth LODGE].
Charlotte Isa bel LEACH grew up at the Vicarage in Thornton-in-Lonsdale
where she likely ex perienced a serene, secure and religious up-bringing.
She had five brothers and sisters: Thomas Jr. (born circa 1848), Edmund
Foxcroft (born circa 1852 ), Felix Henry (born circa 1854), Richard
Ernest (born circa 1857), and Gert rude (born circa 1859).
On July 20, 1871 she married Richard Craven GARNETT wh o was an Anglican
priest at Manchester Cathedral. He had probably met Charl otte through
her father, a fellow clergyman in the Church of England. They were
married at Thornton- in-Lonsdale. Witnesses at the wedding included
C harlotte's sister Gertrude and her brother Thomas as well as Richard
Craven G arnett's brother George and his sister Elizabeth Ann "Lizzie"
Garnett.
Charl otte and the Reverend Richard Craven Garnett took up residence first
at Calve ley-under-Bunbury where he was curate until 1873. At Bunbury,
Charlotte gave birth to the first two of their children:
Anne Craven Garnett and John Jasper Garnett (named after both his grand
father and great grandfather).
Both of these first two Garnett children died in June 1879 within weeks
of each other from an outbreak of diphtheria.
In 1873, the Reverend Garnett became Rector of Delamere where he
remained until 1889. At Delamere the rest of the Garnet t children were
born---Kate (August 11, 1874); Marion (October 2, 1875); Cra ven (August
5, 1877); George Edmund (March 12, 1880); Hubert (November 28 , 1881);
Charlotte Octavia (January 29, 1883); Acton (August 22, 1884); Ruth
(April 11, 1885); and Isobel (November 28, 1888).
The Reverend Garnett bec ame Vicar of Settle, North Yorkshire in 1889
where the children grew up and w ent to school.
At the young age of only 43-years, Charlotte (LEACH) Garnett di ed on
April 6, 1893 from a sudden bout of influenza, pneumonia and acute
rheumatic endocarditis. She was buried in the church yard at Settle. 
Leach, Charlotte Isabel (I269617)
 
12


Craven Garnett was a civil engineer by professsion.

He died on October 26, 1955 at Fernhill, Settle in Yorkshire at age 78. Cause of death was a cerebral haemorrhage and hypertension, certified by L O'Connor. The informant at death was Marion Garnett, sister of 25 Bickerton Road, Headington, Oxford. Death was registered in the district of Ewecross, Settle on October 27, 1955. He died intestate and the High Court of Justice at Wakefield, Yorkshire issued administration papers on on July 23, 1956 but by that time his wife had also died.


Craven Garnett married Winifred Marion Harry and had two sons: George
Evelyn Durant Garnett (b. 1909), and Craven Llewellyn Garnett [died 22
Sept. 1945].
Craven Garnett was a civil engineer by professsion and was living in
Greenf ord, Middlesex at the time of his father's death in 1926.
He died on October 2 6, 1955 at Fernhill, in the town of Settle in
Yorkshire at age 78. Cause of death was a cerebral haemorrhage and
hypertension, certified by L O'Connor. The informant at death was Marion
Garnett, Craven GARNETT's sister [of 25 Bic kerton Road, Headington,
Oxford]. Death was registered in the district of Ew ecross, Settle on
October 27, 1955.
His wife Winifred Marion Garnett died just a few weeks later on December
12, 1955.
Craven GARNETT died intestate a nd the High Court of Justice at Wakefield,
Yorkshire issued administration pa pers on on July 23, 1956---but by the
time probate was issues, his wife had a lso died. 
Garnett, Craven (I269622)
 
13


Craven Llewellyn GARNETT, a School Master at Long Preston, Skipton, died on 22 September 1945 at age 37 years. Cause of death was listed as Uraemia [presence in the blood of urinary matter normally eliminated by the kidneys] and chronic nephritis [inflammation and failure of the kidneys]. Death was certified by Hugh G. Watson, M.B., with Craven Garnett [father of the deceased] in attendance.

At the time of death, Craven Llewellyn Garnett was living at Western Avenue, Long Preston, Skipton---the same address given for his father.

Craven Llewellyn Garnett died intestate, and letters of administration were probated on February 15, 1946 with grant to Craven Garnett, retired civil engineer, "the lawful father and one of the persons entitled to share in the estate of the said intestate". Net value of the personal estate amounted to L600-2s-10d.

Craven Llewellyn GARNETT, a School Master at Long Preston, Skipton, died
on 2 2 September 1945 at age 37 years. Cause of death was listed as
Uraemia [pres ence in the blood of urinary matter normally eliminated by
the kidneys] and chronic nephritis [inflammation and failure of the
kidneys]. Death was certi fied by Hugh G. Watson, M.B., with Craven
Garnett [father of the deceased] i n attendance.
At the time of death, Craven Llewellyn Garnett was living at Wes tern
Avenue, Long Preston, Skipton---the same address given for his father.
Craven Llewellyn Garnett died intestate, and letters of administration
were p robated on February 15, 1946 with grant to Craven Garnett, retired
civil engi neer, "the lawful father and one of the persons entitled to
share in the esta te of the said intestate". Net value of the personal
estate amounted to L600 -2s-10d. 
Garnett, Craven Llewellyn (I269653)
 
14


Elizabeth CRAVEN, wife of John Jasper GARNETT I [q.v. #32], was one of the three daughters and heiresses of Richard CRAVEN [q.v. #66] of Stoke Hall Manor. Her mother was Elizabeth CAWLEY.

Elizabeth's father, who was called Squire Craven, inherited property from one of his three brothers and acquired the Stoke Hall from the Wilbraham family in 1781. The Craven brothers, in conjunction with a Mr Cauliff, may have been partners in the formation of the Curtis and Harvey munitions and explosives company.

Richard Craven's brothers were: Robert
(b. 1749); George (b. 1756), and Daniel (b. 1759).

Elizabeth had two sisters, Ann [CRAVEN] Kent, and Mary [CRAVEN] Richardson. There was said to have also been a young brother, Daniel Craven, who was killed as a boy when he was kicked in the head by a colt while trying to pluck tail hairs for use as a fishing line.

Elizabeth Craven married John Jasper GARNETT I on April 25, 1805. Together they had eight children born in a 10-year period between 1808 and 1818. All of the children, with the exception of John Jasper Garnett II (1816-1870) died without producing off-spring.

Elizabeth [CRAVEN ] Garnett out-lived her husband by some 11 years.

She died on May 12, 1851 at the Garnett family residence on Hospital Street, Nantwich, at the age of 73 years. Cause of death was paralysis---after undergoing a four hour death struggle.

She was buried in the Garnett vault at Acton by Nantwich.



Custom Field:<_FA#> 20 May 1851Acton by Nantwich, by Henry F. Cann [clergy]
El izabeth CRAVEN, wife of John Jasper GARNETT I [q.v. #32], was one of
the thr ee daughters and heiresses of Richard CRAVEN [q.v. #66] of Stoke
Hall Manor. Her mother was Elizabeth CAWLEY.
Elizabeth's father, who was called Squire Cr aven, inherited property from
one of his three brothers and acquired the Stok e Hall from the Wilbraham
family in 1781. The Craven brothers, in conjunctio n with a Mr Cauliff,
may have been partners in the formation of the Curtis an d Harvey
munitions and explosives company.
Richard Craven's brothers were: Robert
(b. 1749); George (b. 1756), and Daniel (b. 1759).
Elizabeth had tw o sisters, Ann [CRAVEN] Kent, and Mary [CRAVEN]
Richardson. There was said to have also been a young brother, Daniel
Craven, who was killed as a boy w hen he was kicked in the head by a
colt while trying to pluck tail hairs for use as a fishing line.
Elizabeth Craven married John Jasper GARNETT I on April 25, 1805.
Together they had eight children born in a 10-year period between 1808
and 1818. All of the children, with the exception of John Jasper Garne tt
II (1816-1870) died without producing off-spring.
Elizabeth [CRAVEN ] Gar nett out-lived her husband by some 11 years.
She died on May 12, 1851 at the G arnett family residence on Hospital
Street, Nantwich, at the age of 73 years. Cause of death was
paralysis---after undergoing a four hour death struggle.
She was buried in the Garnett vault at Acton by Nantwich. 
Craven, Elizabeth (I269502)
 
15


Fletcher Bath Wade Richard GARNETT was born on May 5, 1907 at 14 Sanderson Road in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The birth was registered on June 13, 1907 at Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The father, George Edmund Garnett is shown in the birth register as a Captain in the Royal Artillary, and the mother was recorded as Leda Florence Garnett formerly Wade.

Father Richard Fletcher Garnett died at Holy Cross Hospital, Haslemere in the County of Surry on July 20, 1976 of a malignancy with lung metastases.

His death certificate indicates that by occupation he was a Roman Catholic Priest at Holy Cross Hospital in Haslemere, Surrey. Death was certified by M. Reidy, M.B., and registered by F. Lord on July 21, 1976.

Fletcher Bath Wade Richard GARNETT was born on May 5, 1907 at 14
Sanderson Ro ad in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The birth was registered on June
13, 1907 at Newc astle-upon-Tyne. The father, George Edmund Garnett is
shown in the birth reg ister as a Captain in the Royal Artillary, and the
mother was recorded as Le da Florence Garnett formerly Wade.
Father Richard Fletcher Garnett died at Hol y Cross Hospital, Haslemere in
the County of Surrey on July 20, 1976 of a mal ignancy with lung
metastases.
His death certificate indicates that by occupa tion he was a Roman
Catholic Priest at Holy Cross Hospital in Haslemere, Surr ey. Death was
certified by M. Reidy, M.B., and registered by F. Lord on Jul y 21,
1976. 
Garnett, Fletcher Bath Wade R. (I269639)
 
16


Fletcher Bath WADE, father of Leda Florence Wade Garnett, was listed as a Barrister at Law on this daughter's marriage certificate. At time of this marriage, the Wade residence was recorded as Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Fletcher Bath WADE, father of Leda Florence Wade Garnett, was listed as
a Ba rrister at Law on this daughter's marriage certificate. At time of
this marr iage, the Wade residence was recorded as Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Wade, Fletcher Bath (I269774)
 
17


From the Wellington and Shrewsbury Journal for January 11, 1930, we get this account of the life and good works of Miss Grace Catherine GARNETT-BOTFIELD:

The death occurred on Saturday at her residence, Findor, Haughton Lane, Shifnal, of Miss Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield, at the age of 76 years. A daughter of the late Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield, of Decker Hill, since her father's death, Miss Botfield had resided in Shifnal, where she closely identified herself with all local good works.

For many years she had been hon. secretary of the Shifnal District Nursing Fund, head of the Mothers' Meeting, and an associate of the Mothers' Union.
She had also been president of the local Woman's Institute, and hon. treasurer of the Woman's Conservative Association.

The funeral took place in Shifnal parish churchyard on Wednesday, when the various public bodies with which she had been connected were represented. The service was choral, the surplice choir being in attendance.

The proceedings in church were conducted by the Rev. E. Corbett-Winder, the lesson being read by the Rev. J. K. Swinburne (vicar). Appropriate music was rendered by Mr. A. Roberts (organist), and the hymns, "Through all the changing scenes of life" and "Abide with Me" were sung, together with a Psalm and the Nunc Dimittis.

The committal at the grave was taken by the Rev. W. J. Stanton (Rugeley) and the vicar pronounced the blessing. The bearers were Messrs. H. R. and H. D. Spencer, E. H. and J. Jones, T. Barker, S. Pointon, A. Beamand, and W. Fryer.

The mourners included: Major and Mrs. Garnett-Botfield, Beamish, Albrighton (brother and sister-in-law); the
Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield (Colwny Bay, brother);
Major and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (Vaynor Park, Welshpool, nephew and niece); Capt. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (Berriew, nephew and niece); Mrs. G. Ripley (niece), the Rev. E. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (nephew and niece); Dr. and Mrs M. Legge (Albrighton, nephew and niece); Major Bardwell (nephew);
Mr. T. Aldersey (Shifnal, brother-in-law); Mrs Stanton (Snelston Hall, Ashbourne); Col. J. A. Howard McLean (Aston Hall, Shifnal); Col. the Hon F. H. C. Weld Forester
(Decker Hill), Dr. S. B. Legge, Mrs Grant Legge...
[and other mourners also named].

Her will was proved at Shrewsury on March 3, 1930. She appointed her brother Walter Dutton GARNETT-BOTFIELD as executor and bequeathed legaies to her relatives: Charles Ramsey GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Thomas Francis Garnett ALDERSEY, Walter Massie ALDERSEY, Constance Rosemary LEGGE, William Scott BARDWELL, Thomas Garnett Newman BARDWELL and many others.

From the Wellington and Shrewsbury Journal for January 11, 1930, we get
thi s account of the life and good works of Miss Grace Catherine
GARNETT-BOTFIELD :
The death occurred on Saturday at her residence, Findor,
Haughton Lane, Shifnal, of Miss Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield,
at the age of 76 years. A daughter of the late Rev. W. B.
Garnett-Botfield, of Dec ker Hill, since her father's death, Miss
Botfield had resided in Shifna l, where she closely identified
herself with all local good works.
For many years she had been hon. secretary of the Shifnal District
Nursing Fun d, head of the Mothers' Meeting, and an associate of
the Mothers' Unio n.
She had also been president of the local Woman's Institute, and
ho n. treasurer of the Woman's Conservative Association.
The funeral took place in Shifnal parish churchyard on
Wednesday, when the vari ous public bodies with which she had been
connected were represented. The service was choral, the
surplice choir being in attendance.
The p roceedings in church were conducted by the Rev. E.
Corbett-Winder, t he lesson being read by the Rev. J. K.
Swinburne (vicar). Appropria te music was rendered by Mr. A.
Roberts (organist), and the hymns, "Thr ough all the changing
scenes of life" and "Abide with Me" were sung, together with a
Psalm and the Nunc Dimittis.
The committal at the gr ave was taken by the Rev. W. J.
Stanton (Rugeley) and the vicar pro nounced the blessing. The
bearers were Messrs. H. R. and H. D. Spence r, E. H. and J. Jones,
T. Barker, S. Pointon, A. Beamand, and W. Fryer.
The mourners included: Major and Mrs. Garnett-Botfield,
Beamish, Albrighton (brother and sister-in-law); the
Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield (Colwny Bay, brother);
Major and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (Vaynor Park,
Welshpool, nephew and niece); Capt. and Mrs.
Corbett -Winder (Berriew, nephew and niece); Mrs. G. Ripley
(niece), the Rev. E. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (nephew and
niece); Dr. and Mrs M. Leg ge (Albrighton, nephew and niece);
Major Bardwell (nephew);
Mr. T. Aldersey (Shifnal, brother-in-law); Mrs Stanton
(Snelston Hall, Ash bourne); Col. J. A. Howard McLean (Aston Hall,
Shifnal); Col. the Hon F. H. C. Weld Forester
(Decker Hill), Dr. S. B. Legge, Mrs Grant Legge ...
[and other mourners also named].
Her will was proved at Shrewsury on Marc h 3, 1930. She appointed her
brother Walter Dutton GARNETT-BOTFIELD as execu tor and bequeathed legaies
to her relatives: Charles Ramsey GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Thomas Francis Garnett
ALDERSEY, Walter Massie ALDERSEY, Constance Rosemary LEGGE, William Scott
BARDWELL, Thomas Garnett Newman BARDWELL and many others 
Garnett-Botfield, Grace Catharine (I270012)
 
18


George Edmund GARNETT served in the Royal Artillery. His military records [from the Army List] show that he was commissioned as second Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery on June 25, 1899 and promoted to Lieutenant on February 16, 1901. He passed his final examination of advanced class at the ordnance college. On April 28 1905 he made the rank of Captain and was inspector of Staff from April 1, 1905 to May 31, 1908.

George Edmund GARNETT served in the Royal Artillery. His military
records [f rom the Army List] show that he was commissioned as second
Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery on June 25, 1899 and promoted to
Lieutenant on February 16, 1901. He passed his final examination of
advanced class at the ordnance coll ege. On April 28 1905 he made the
rank of Captain and was inspector of Staff from April 1, 1905 to May 31,
1908.
George Edmund Garnett married Leda Flor ence WADE on December 22, 1903 and
had two children: Richard (b. May 5, 1907 ), and Hubert Edmund
(1908-1924).
He died February 22, 1912 and was buried at Salwarpe. 
Garnett, George Edmund (I269623)
 
19


George Evelyn GARNETT was born on July 21, 1909 at Ladywood, Salwarpe in the County of Worcester. The birth was registered at Ladywood on August 18, 1909 by James W. Taylor, Registrar.

George Evelyn GARNETT was born on July 21, 1909 at Ladywood, Salwarpe in
the County of Worcester. The birth was registered at Ladywood on August
18, 1909 by James W. Taylor, Registrar. 
Garnett, George Evelyn Durant (I269645)
 
20


George GARNETT was born at Nantwich in about the year 1734. His father was Samuel GARNETT and his mother was Ann SALMON, daughter of George SALMON who was a mercer (a trader in textile goods) in Nantwich.

George Garnett became a cheesefactor--that is, he purchased cheese directly from the farmers in the area and resold it to other buyers in places as far away as London and Bristol.

There is an anecdote told about George Garnett that illustrates his business sense: the story goes that George once sold a shipment of cheese to a firm in London, but learned just afterward that the buyer was about to go bankrupt George immediately jumped on his horse and rode the 166-mile trip to London, arriving just in time to stop delivery and so saved his money.

George Garnett was successful in business and owned Haughton Hall in Nantwich. This manor house was purchased from the trustees of the Comberbach family in March, 1780. He also purchased additional property in Haughton township as well as in Nantwich.

In his will, George bequeathed Haughton Hall upon his death to his son William who died in 1828 leaving the property to his son the Reverend William Bishton Garnett.

George Garnett was described as being a handsome man of about 5-foot 10-inches in height. The Reverend Richard Craven Garnett (George's great grandson) had a large oil painting of George Garnett.

The painting was said to have been painted when George was about 80-years old. Another painting of George Garnett as a much younger man was believed to have been in the possession of Captain Alfred Ingleby Garnett (the Reverend William Biston Garnett-Botfield's brother), but its whereabouts is not known today. A painting of George's wife, Ann Sanders, was owned at one time by the Reverend William Bishton Garnett-Botfield , but that too has not been found.

In his will (written on July 22, 1813 and probated September 28, 1815 after his death), George Garnett left his entire estate valued at 1500 pounds to his six surviving children: William Garnett, Thomas Garnett, John Jasper Garnett, Sarah Catherine Grimshaw (widowed by that time), Ann Atkinson, and Rebecca Atkinson.

According to this will, all household goods and furniture, plate, linen, china, glasses and brewing vessels in and about the dwelling house in Hospital Street in Nantwich (which was owned by his son William) and in a second house known as Haughton Hall (also owned by his son William) were to be divided equally between his six children. Also all monies, goods, chattels, personal estate and effects were to be divided equally between John Jasper Garnett and his two sisters Ann Atkinson and Rebecca Atkinson.

There are three references to George Garnett recorded in James Hall's book
The History of the Town and Parish of Nantwich: Firstly, George Garnett was a signatory to proposed alterations being made to the Nantwich Church (vestry meeting held January 7, 1770).

Secondly, on November 24, 1779, George Garnett, cheesefactor of Nantwich, was elected a Trustee of Sir Edmund Wright's Charity founded in 1638.

And thirdly, George Garnett is recorded as a shareholder in a new workhouse erected in Nantwich in 1779-80.

Of the children of George Garnett and Ann Sanders, the following information is known:

George Garnett, the first son died as a child on February 22, 1769.

The second son, Samuel Garnett, died at the age of 7-years in 1768.

A third son, Thomas Garnett, also died either at birth or as a young infant.

The first daughters, Sarah Catherine and Anne Garnett, both born in 1764, grew to adulthood and married John GRIMSHAW and John ATKINSON respectively.

William Garnett, born in 1766, became the Reverend William Garnett and married Elizabeth Sophia BISHTON, daughter of John Bishton. The Bishtons were a wealthy family, and William Garnett's son, the Reverend William Bishton Garnett inherited the family estate at Decker Hill, Shifnel, as well as the royal license to use the BOTFIELD name in conjunction with the Garnett name.

Thomas Garnett, born 1768, was the second child in George Garnett's family to carry the name of Thomas. He married Mary HARWOOD on May 28, 1792.

Rebecca Garnett, born 1769, married Thomas ATKINSON (the brother of John ATKINSON who married Anne Garnett). They had a son, the Reverend Thomas ATKINSON of Yorkshire, and three daughters. One of these daughters, Emma Atkinson, married Mr. Charles Slingsby of Scriven. The son of Emma and Charles Slingsby, inherited the lands and titles of his uncle, and became the 10th (and last) baronet of Nova Scotia.

John Jasper Garnett, the last child of George Garnett born in 1775, married Elizabeth CRAVEN, one of three daughters of Richard Craven. The Cravens were also well-to-do and the father, Richard Craven , had purchased the Stoke Hall estate from the Wilbraham family in 1781. Upon the death of Richard Craven in 1804, the estate passed to John Jasper Garnett's wife, Elizabeth, and to her two sisters, Mary Richardson and Ann Kent. John Jasper Garnett had eight surviving children, one of whom was also named John Jasper Garnett---the progenitor of our line of the Garnett family.


GARNETT, George
[1734-1814]
Born: 1734 at Nantwich, Cheshire, England.
Died : November 30, 1814 at Nantwich, Cheshire, England
Father: Samuel GARNETT [171 3-1777]
Mother: Ann SALMON [1714-1791]
Spouse: Ann SANDERS [1731-1796]
Georg e Garnett was born at Nantwich in about the year 1734. His father
was Samuel Garnett and his mother was Ann Salmon, daughter of George
Salmon who was a m ercer (a trader in textile goods) in Nantwich.
George Garnett became a cheesef actor---that is, he purchased cheese
directly from the farmers in the area an d resold it to other buyers in
places as far away as London and Bristol.
T here is an anecdote told about George Garnett that illustrates his
business s ense. The story goes that George once sold a shipment of
cheese to a firm in London. But he learned just afterward that the buyer
was about to go bankru pt. George immediately jumped on his horse and rode
the 166-mile trip to Lond on, arriving just in time to stop delivery and
so saved his money.
George Ga rnett was successful in business and owned Haughton Hall in
Nantwich. This m anor house was purchased from the trustees of the
Comberbach family in March, 1780. He also purchased additional property
in Haughton township as well as in Nantwich.
In his will, George bequeathed Haughton Hall upon his death to h is son
William who died in 1828 leaving the property to his son the Reverend
William Bishton Garnett.
George Garnett was described as being a handsome ma n of about 5-foot
10-inches in height. The Reverend Richard Craven Garnett ( George's great
grandson) had a large oil painting of George Garnett.
The pai nting was said to have been painted when George was about 80-years
old. Ano ther painting of George Garnett as a much younger man was
believed to have be en in the possession of Captain Alfred Ingleby Garnett
(the Reverend William Bishton Garnett-Botfield's brother), but its
whereabouts is not known today. A painting of George's wife, Ann
Sanders, was owned at one time by the Reve rend William Bishton
Garnett-Botfield, but that too has not been found.
In h is will (written on July 22, 1813 and probated on September 28, 1815
after h is death), George Garnett left his entire estate valued at 1500
pounds to his six surviving children: William Garnett, Thomas Garnett,
John Jasper Garnett , Sarah Catherine Grimshaw (widowed by that time), Ann
Atkinson, and Rebecca Atkinson.
According to this will, all household goods and furniture, plate, li nen,
china, glasses and brewing vessels in and about the dwelling house in
Hospital Street in Nantwich (which was owned by his son William) and in a
sec ond house known as Haughton Hall (also owned by his son William) were
to be d ivided equally between his six children. Also all monies, goods,
chattels, p ersonal estate and effects were to be divided equally between
John Jasper Gar nett and his two sisters Ann Atkinson and Rebecca
Atkinson.
There are three references to George Garnett recorded in James Hall's
book The History of th e Town and Parish of Nantwich: Firstly, George
Garnett was a signatory to pro posed alterations being made to the
Nantwich Church (vestry meeting held Janu ary 7, 1770).
Secondly, on November 24, 1779, George Garnett, cheesefactor of Nantwich,
was elected a Trustee of Sir Edmund Wright's Charity founded in 163 8.
And thirdly, George Garnett is recorded as a shareholder in a new
workhou se erected in Nantwich in 1779-80.
Of the children of George Garnett and Ann S anders, the following
information is known:
George Garnett, the first son di ed as a child on February 22, 1769.
The second son, Samuel Garnett, died at th e age of 7-years in 1768.
A third son, Thomas Garnett, also died either at bir th or as a young
infant.
The first daughters, Sarah Catherine and Anne Garne tt, both born in 1764,
grew to adulthood and married John Grimshaw and John A tkinson
respectively.
William Garnett, born in 
Garnett, George (I269422)
 
21


George GARNETT, third child of John Jasper GARNETT II] and Ann ACTON, and younger brother of the Reverend Richard Craven GARNETT, was born at Stoke Hall Manor on August 27, 1845 at 12:45 pm.

This George Garnett is known to us primarily through his hand-written 24-page history and personal recollection of the Garnett family (dated October 6, 1910) which he prepared at the request of his two nieces Kate and Marion Garnett, the daughters of his brother Rev. Richard Craven Garnett.

George Garnett was educated at Acton Grammar School. He received tutelage from Mr. Grosvenors, the Curate of St. John's, Chester and Bassall, and coach for the army.

George passed his examination for entrance into the army at age 18 in February, 1864 (coming 54th out of 108 candidates who passed), and joined the Depot of the 57th Regiment of Foot stationed at Cork in the autumn of 1864. Army records show that he purchased his rank of Ensign and entered service on August 30, 1864.

He served with that regiment until 1871, at which time he quit the army at the request of his fiancee.

He married Mary Eleanor CURWEN, eldest daughter of Robert CURWEN of Berkly House, Bickley, Kent. Robert CURWEN was "a flannel warehouse man" in the city and his family originally came from Maryport, Cumberland.

George Garnett studied veterinary medicine at the Royal Veterinary College, Camden Town, London, from which he obtained a diploma. He served as horse mount officer at Durban, Natal during the Zulu War and in the Transvaal. Afterwards, he worked as veterinary surgeon with the rank of Captain in the Cape Mounted Rifles and was with them during the Basuto War (1880-1881). He was awarded a medal and clasp.

At the time he wrote his Garnett family history, George Garnett was aged 65 years old, weighed "somewhat over eleven stone" [about 154-pounds], and stood "5-foot 5-inches in height without boots". He was fond of horses, hounds and fishing, "the sound of a horn", and also enjoyed his three-ton yawl yacht Imogen.

A photostatic copy of George Garnett's original handwritten family history was made by my father, Geoffrey GARNETT, during a visit to Canada by his aunt Marion Garnett, who had brought the volume with her on the trip from England. This would have been in the late 1950s or early 1960s. Copies of this manuscript have been used extensively as the basis for this present account of the early history of the Garnett family.

In later life, George Garnett apparently lost contact with his two daughters Mary and Frances (whom, he says in the 1910 journal, he had not "heard from for many years".) He was living at that time at 7 Hove Park Villas, Hove, Sussex---an address on the south-east side of the street above Day and Hill fruiterers.

George Garnett died on New Years Day, 1924----probably at Hove in Sussex, a small town near Brighton on the south coast of England.


Custom Field:<_FA#> 25 Nov 1845Acton by Nantwich, Robert Mayer, Vicar
George G ARNETT, third child of John Jasper GARNETT II] and Ann ACTON,
and younger b rother of the Reverend Richard Craven GARNETT, was born at
Stoke Hall Manor on August 27, 1845 at 12:45 pm.
This George Garnett is known to us primarily t hrough his hand-written
24-page history and personal recollection of the Garn ett family (dated
October 6, 1910) which he prepared at the request of his tw o nieces Kate
and Marion Garnett, the daughters of his brother Rev. Richard Craven
Garnett.
George Garnett was educated at Acton Grammar School. He rece ived tutelage
from Mr. Grosvenors, the Curate of St. John's, Chester and Bas sall, and
coach for the army.
George passed his examination for entrance int o the army at age 18 in
February, 1864 (coming 54th out of 108 candidates who passed), and
joined the Depot of the 57th Regiment of Foot stationed at Cor k in the
autumn of 1864. Army records show that he purchased his rank of Ens ign
and entered service on August 30, 1864.
He served with that regiment unt il 1871, at which time he quit the army
at the request of his fiancee.
He ma rried Mary Eleanor CURWEN, eldest daughter of Robert CURWEN of
Berkly House, Bickley, Kent. Robert CURWEN was "a flannel warehouse man"
in the city and his family originally came from Maryport, Cumberland.
George Garnett studied v eterinary medicine at the Royal Veterinary
College, Camden Town, London, from which he obtained a diploma. He
served as horse mount officer at Durban, Na tal during the Zulu War and in
the Transvaal. Afterwards, he worked as vet erinary surgeon with the
rank of Captain in the Cape Mounted Rifles and was w ith them during the
Basuto War (1880-1881). He was awarded a medal and clasp .
At the time he wrote his Garnett family history, George Garnett was aged
65 years old, weighed "somewhat over eleven stone" [about 154-pounds],
and s tood "5-foot 5-inches in height without boots". He was fond of
horses, hound s and fishing, "the sound of a horn", and also enjoyed his
three-ton yawl yac ht Imogen.
A photostatic copy of George Garnett's original handwritten family
history was made by my father, Geoffrey GARNETT, during a visit to
Canada by his aunt Marion Garnett, who had brought the volume with her
on the trip from England. This would have been in the late 1950s or
early 1960s. Copies of this manuscript have been used extensively as the
basis for this present account of the early history of the Garnett family.
In later life, George Gar nett apparently lost contact with his two
daughters Mary and Frances (whom, he says in the 1910 journal, he had
not "heard from for many years".) He w as living at that time at 7 Hove
Park Villas, Hove, Sussex---an address on th e south-east side of the
street above Day and Hill fruiterers.
George Garnet t died on New Years Day, 1924----probably at Hove in
Sussex, a small town n ear Brighton on the south coast of England. 
Garnett, George (I269629)
 
22


Hubert GARNETT was the seventh child of the Reverend Richard Craven GARNETT [q.v. #8] and Charlotte Isabel LEACH [q.v. #9]. He was born at Northwich, Cheshire on November 28, 1881 during the period when his father was Rector of the Delamere parish church (1873-1889). The family lived then in a house at 37 Northwich Road, Delamere.

The Reverend Garnett and his family moved to Settle, NorthYorkshire in 1889 when Hubert was eight years old, and it was there that Hubert went to school and where the family continued to reside until 1901 when Reverend Garnett accepted the post of Rector at Salwarpe, Worchester.

Hubert grew up in a large family---nine of the eleven children of Richard and Charlotte Garnett survived to maturity. Several of Hubert's sisters (Marion, Kate, Isobel) are known to have been active in the church, but little is currently known about Hubert's childhood, education, or religious devotions.

At some point in the early 1900s, Hubert met and married Ethel Mairi CLAYTON [q.v. #5], daughter of George Edward CLAYTON and Sarah Jane VEEVERS. The date, place and circumstances of this marriage are as yet unknown, but their meeting and marriage perhaps occurred in Settle since both families lived in that area.

In about 1910 or 1912, they emigrated to Canada and resided close to Montreal. It is thought that Hubert was employed for a time on the construction of the Blue Bonnets racetrack in Montreal.

When the Great War broke out in 1914, the Northern Explosives munitions plant at Dragon, Quebec (which had been founded in 1907 by Colonel James Riley and his brother Major George Riley) was taken over by the English munitions firm of Curtiss and Harvey.

Hubert Garnett's great great grandfather, Richard CRAVEN and his brothers are believed to have been partners in the original formation of the Curtiss and Harvey gunpowder company. It is perhaps through this connection that Hubert came to work for the company plant at Dragon.

Hubert was working as a security guard in this munitions factory (where some 1,200 men were employed in round-the-clock shifts to supply the war effort). At about 8:40 am. on the morning of Saturday, August 18, 1917 a terrific blast occurred on the TNT production line, followed in quick succession by two other explosions as stored depots of explosives ignited.

The entire plant and much of the surrounding towns of Dragon, Hudson and Rigaud where devastated by the blast. Luckily only one man was killed (the plant manager Gordon Shortrede) and six others injured.

Hubert's wife, Ethel Mairi Garnett, along with a number of other people in the town were not found until three days after the explosion. The event undoubtedly had a profound effect on those who lived through it. Apart from the great explosion in Halifax harbor (also in 1917), the catastrophe at Dragon was the most powerful civilian blast to have taken place in Canada during the war.

The plant was later reopened by its old owners, Northern Explosives, and carried on operations on a smaller scale until 1927 when it was purchased by CIL and closed down. At that point, Hubert and the Garnett family (which by then included three children: Nancy Isobel born 1914; Edmund Jasper "Ted" born 1916; and Geoffrey born 1918) moved to McMasterville, Quebec.

Hubert continued to work for the CIL explosives division at the McMasterville plant until his retirement at age 65 in 1946 after over 25 years of service to the company.

In McMasterville the Garnett family lived first at a house located beside the Beloeil railway station on Richelieu Boulevard overlooking the river and the tressel bridge to Otterburn Park. Later, in the 1940s, Hubert purchased a house on Orsali Street in Beloeil where he and his wife continued to live until Ethel Mairi became incapacitated and was confined to a nursing home in Lachine, Quebec. She died there on March 12, 1961 and was buried in Hudson Heights not far from the site of the 1917 Dragon explosion.

Hubert sold the house on Orsali Street and lived with his daughter Nancy and her husband George Russell LUSBY at 553 Montee-des-Trente, St-Hilaire from 1962 until 1977.

Hubert Garnett died on July 11, 1977 at Hospital D'Argenteuil in Lachute, Quebec at the age of 96 years. He was buried next to his wife in the cemetery of St. James Anglican Church in Hudson Heights. Funeral arrangements were made through the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home in Lachute.

At the time of his death, he was survived by his daughter Nancy Isobel LUSBY, and two sons Edmund Jasper ("Ted") GARNETT, and Geoffrey GARNETT.

In addition to his immediate children, Hubert Garnett was also survived by eight grandchildren:

Donald Geoffrey GARNETT (1947)

Douglas James GARNETT (1947)

Clifford LUSBY (1949)

Brian GARNETT (1952)

Brenda GARNETT (1955)

Robert "Bobby" GARNETT (1958)

Natalie GARNETT (?)

Edmund "Teddy" GARNETT (?)

Under the provisions of his last Will and Testament (written and dated September 21, 1962 and probated upon his death by the Superior Court, district of St-Hyacinthe) Hubert Garnett instructed that the entire proceeds of his estate be divided equally among his three surviving children. The total net value of the estate at time of death amounted to $33,000.

Hubert GARNETT was the seventh child of the Reverend Richard Craven
GARNETT and Charlotte Isabel LEACH. He was born at Northwich, Cheshire
on November 2 8, 1881 during the period when his father was Rector of the
Delamere parish church (1873-1889). The family lived then in a house at
37 Northwich Road, De lamere.
The Reverend Garnett and his family moved to Settle, NorthYorkshire in
1889 when Hubert was eight years old, and it was there that Hubert went
to school and where the family continued to reside until 1901 when
Reverend Garnett accepted the post of Rector at Salwarpe, Worchester.
Hubert grew up in a large family---nine of the eleven children of Richard
and Charlotte Garnett survived to maturity. Several of Hubert's sisters
(Marion, Kate, Isobel) are known to have been active in the church, but
little is currently known about Hubert's childhood, education, or
religious devotions.
At some point in the early 1900s, Hubert met and married Ethel Mairi
CLAYTON], daughter of George Edward CLAYTON and Sarah Jane VEEVERS. The
date, place and circumstances of this marriage are as yet unknown, but
their meeting and marriage perhaps occurred in Settle since both families
lived in that area.
In about 1910 or 1912, they emigrated to Canada and resided close to
Montreal. It is thought that Hubert was employed for a time on the
construction of the Blue Bonnets racetrack in Montreal.
When the Great War broke out in 1914, the Northern Explosives munitions
plant at Dragon, Quebec (which had been founded in 1907 by Colonel James
Riley and his brother Major George Riley) was taken over by the English
munitions firm of Curtiss and Harvey.
Hubert Garnett's great great grandfather, Richard CRAVEN and his brothers
are believed to have been partners in the original formation of the
Curtiss and Harvey gunpowder company. It is perhaps through this
connection that Hubert came to work for the company plant at Dragon.
During World War I, Hubert was working at the Northern Explosives
munitions factory (where some 1,200 men were employed in round-the-clock
shifts to supply the war effort). At about 8:40 am. on the morning of
Saturday, August 18, 1917 a terrific blast occurred on the TNT production
line, followed in quick succession by two other explosions as stored
depots of explosives ignited.
The entire plant and much of the surrounding towns of Dragon, Hudson and
Rigaud were devastated by the blast. Luckily only one man was killed
(the plant manager Gordon Shortrede) and six others injured.
Hubert' s wife, Ethel Mairi Garnett, along with a number of other people
in the town were not found until three days after the explosion. The
event undoubtedly had a profound effect on those who lived through it.
Apart from the great explosion in Halifax harbor (also in 1917), the
catastrophe at Dragon was the most powerful civilian blast to have taken
place in Canada during the war.
The plant was later reopened by its old owners, Northern Explosives, and
carried on operations on a smaller scale until 1927 when it was purchased
by CIL and closed down. At that point, Hubert and the Garnett family
(which by then included three children: Nancy Isobel born 1914; Edmund
Jasper "Ted" born 1916; and Geoffrey born 1918) moved to McMasterville,
Quebec.
Hubert continued to work for the CIL explosives division at the company's
plant in McMasterville, Quebec until his retirement at age 65 in 1946
after over 25 years of service to the company.
In McMasterville the Garnett family lived first at a house located beside
the Beloeil railway station on Richelieu Boulevard overl ooking the river
and the tressel bridge to Otterburn Park. Later, in the 1940s, Hubert
purchased a house on Orsali Street in Beloeil where he and his wife
continued to live until Ethel Mairi became incapacitated and was
confined to a nursing home in Lachine, Quebec. 
Garnett, Hubert (I269596)
 
23


Ida Mary Garnett-Botfield [nee Aldersey] died at the vicarage in Moreton, Oswestry. Her will is recorded on our Garnett Probate Index:

GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Ida Mary (Mrs.) Female.
Died: 13 May 1923 at Moreton Vicarage near Oswestry, Shropshire. Probate issued 02 July 1923. Spouse: Rev. Charles Ramsay GARNETT-BOTFIELD. Probate issued at Shrewsbury to Harry BARNSTON [M.P.] & George Henry Wilson CRUTTWELL [solicitor]. Effects valued at L853-14s-3d. Microfilm #0251439.

Ida Mary Garnett-Botfield's will is a two page document hand-written in her own neat hand and dated August 18, 1922---just seven months before her death. It reads:

I give and bequeath all my furniture and personal effects unto my Trustees upon trust to allow my husband the said Charles Botfield to have the use and enjoyment thereof during his life he keeping the same in repair and insured and from and after his death I give and bequeath the same to my son Jack Massie Garnett-Botfield absolutely and I declare that it shall not be obligatory on my Trustees to make an inventory of such furniture and effects or to see that the same is properly insured. All the rest residue and remainder of my estate and effects of every description I give devise and bequeath unto my Trustees upon trust to pay over and transfer the same to my said son Jack Massie Garnett-Botfield for his own use and benefit absolutely. And I declare that I have not mentioned my daughter
Betty in this my Will not through lack of affection but because I consider she is already well provided for. And I declare that notwithstanding his executorship and trusteeship the said George Henry Wilson Cruttwell or his partners shall be entitled to charge and be paid his and their proper professional charges out of my estate for any work done by him or them relating thereto or the carrying out of the trusts of this my Will including acts which a Trustee not being in any profession or business could have done personally. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 18th day of August One thousand nine hundred and twenty two.


ALDERSEY, Ida Mary
[1865-1923]
Ida Mary Garnett-Botfield [nee Aldersey] died at the vicarage in Moreton,
Oswestry. Her will is recorded in the Probate In dex as follows:
GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Ida Mary (Mrs.) Female. Died: 13 May 1923 a t Moreton
Vicarage near Oswestry, Shropshire. Probate issued 02 July 1923.
Spouse: Rev. Charles Ramsay GARNETT-BOTFIELD. Probate issued at
Shrewsb ury to Harry BARNSTON [M.P.] & George Henry Wilson CRUTTWELL
[solicitor]. Ef fects valued at L853-14s-3d. Microfilm #0251439.
Ida Mary Garnett-Botfield's will is a two page document hand-written in
her own neat hand and dated Augus t 18, 1922---just seven months before
her death. It reads:
"...I give and be queath all my furniture and personal effects unto my
Trustees upon trust to a llow my husband the said Charles Botfield to
have the use and enjoyment ther eof during his life he keeping the same in
repair and insured and from and af ter his death I give and bequeath the
sameto my son Jack Massie Garnett-Botfi eld absolutely and I declare that
it shall not be obligatory on my Trustees to make an inventory of
such furniture and effects or to see that the sa me is properly insured.
All the rest residue and remainder of my estate and effects of every
description I give devise and bequeath unto my Trustees upon trust to pay
over and transfer the same to my said son Jack Massie Garnett- Botfield
for his own use and benefit absolutely. And I declare that I have n ot
mentioned my daughter Betty in this my Will not through lack of affection
but because I consider she is already well provided for. And I declare
tha t notwithstanding his executorship and trusteeship the said George
Henry Wils on Cruttwell or his partners shall be entitled to charge and be
paid his and their proper professional charges out of my estate for any
work done by him o r them relating thereto or the carrying out of the
trusts of this my Will inc luding acts which a Trustee not being in any
profession or business could hav e done personally. In witness whereof I
have hereunto set my hand this 18th day of August One thousand nine
hundred and twenty two." 
Aldersey, Ida Mary (I270151)
 
24


John Charles Ingilby GARNETT died on June 8, 1905 at Middleberg Military Hospital, Orange River colony, South Africa. His regular address was given as Hampton Post, Malpas, Cheshire. He was unmarried.

Probate was granted at London on July 7, 1905 to Francis Richard CLARKE [solicitor], and his brother George William GARNETT [esquire]. Net value of his estate was L1,660-12s-2d.

His Will read as follows:

This is the last will of me John Charles Ingilby Garnett of Malpas in the county of Chester. I bequeath five pounds to the Hunt Servants Benefit Society. I bequeath any stock or other security which I may be entitled to in the Great Central Railway to my sister Jane Sophia Garnett. I bequeath two hundred and fifty pounds to my sister Fanny Blanche Smith and two hundred and fifty pounds to my brother Alfred Egerton Garnett and I devise and bequeath the remainder of any property of which I may die posessed or over which I may have any disposing power at the time of my death to my brother George William Garnett. I appoint Francis Richard Clarke of Fosseway Lichfield and the said George William Garnett executors of this my will in witness whereof I have herunto set my hand this 13th day of May, 1904.

Witnesses were H. Bird of Fosseway Lichfield and A. Evans, also of Fosseway Lichfield.

John Charles Ingilby GARNETT died on June 8, 1905 at Middleberg Military
Hosp ital, Orange River colony, South Africa. His regular address was
given as Ha mpton Post, Malpas, Cheshire. He was unmarried.
Probate was granted at Lon don on July 7, 1905 to Francis Richard CLARKE
[solicitor], and his brother Ge orge William GARNETT [esquire]. Net value
of his estate was L1,660-12s-2d.
His Will read as follows:
This is the last will of me John Charles Ingilby Gar nett of Malpas in the
county of Chester. I bequeath five pounds to the Hunt Servants Benefit
Society. I bequeath any stock or other security which I may be entitled
to in the Great Central Railway to my sister Jane Sophia Garnett . I
bequeath two hundred and fifty pounds to my sister Fanny Blanche Smith
and two hundred and fifty pounds to my brother Alfred Egerton Garnett and
I devise and bequeath the remainder of any property of which I may die
posessed or over which I may have any disposing power at the time of my
death to my b rother George William Garnett. I appoint Francis Richard
Clarke of Fosseway Lichfield and the said George William Garnett
executors of this my will in wi tness whereof I have herunto set my hand
this 13th day of May, 1904.
Witness es were H. Bird of Fosseway Lichfield and A. Evans, also of
Fosseway Lichfiel d. 
Garnett, John Charles Ingilby (I270121)
 
25


John Jasper GARNETT I was the ninth and last child of George GARNETT and Ann SANDERS, and was probably born in the year 1774. He was christened at Nantwich church on January 17, 1775.

John Jasper Garnett married Elizabeth CRAVEN, one of the three heiresses of the Stoke Hall estate, which had been purchased by Elizabeth's father, Richard Craven in 1781 from Roger Wilbraham. John Jasper and Elizabeth Garnett had eight children, some of whom survived into adulthood---but with the exception of their son, John Jasper Garnett II, all of their other children died without leaving off-spring.

John Jasper Garnett lived in a large, somewhat modern house in the Welsh Row, Nantwich. The house had steps up to the front door and was nearly opposite to the Queen's Head.

He was a lieutenant in the Nantwich volunteer regiment, a treasurer of the Nantwich Bible Society in 1824, and along with two of his relations (John Richardson and William Acton) was elected a Trustee of Wright's Charity in 1817.

John Jasper Garnett started a bank in partnership with Mr. Charles Broughton the brother of Sir John Broughton of Doddington, and with another man by the name of Sprout. The bank opened on Saturday, November 12, 1808 in premises next to the Griffin Inn in Nantwich.

The bank stayed in operation for some eighteen years, but was forced to close on February 13, 1826. The story goes that Charles Broughton had an argument with his brother, Sir John Broughton, and when the rent was due on the bank, Sir John refused to accept the Broughton- Garnett bank notes---thereby causing a run on the deposits, and bringing about the bank's closure.

Following the crash of the banking venture, John Jasper took his family to live in Torrington Square, London where he started another business. But a fire put him out of business a second time.

John Jasper Garnett died at The Lodge in Nantwich on June 6, 1840 at the age of 65 years. Attending physician at his death was Doctor John Richardson, his brother-in-law. He was buried in the Garnett family tomb at Acton church cemetery near Nantwich.

His wife, Elizabeth (Craven) Garnett continued to live in Nantwich, and died at the age of 73-years on May 12, 1851 at the Garnett residence on Hospital Street. Cause of death was indicated as paralysis.

All of the family of John Jasper Garnett died of consumption or other diseases of a respiratory nature. Charlotte Frances Garnett died in July, 1838 of a broken blood vessel in the lungs (possibly brought on by tuberculosis).

George Garnett, the first son born to John Jasper in 1806, died of pleurisy at the Stoke Hall estate in July, 1845.

John Jasper Garnett II (1816-1870), was also not of a strong physical constitution, but did live to the age of 54 years and fathered three surviving children as well as possibly two others who are believed to have died in infancy. John Jasper Garnett's surviving children were: The Reverend Richard Craven Garnett (1843-1926) ]; Elizabeth Ann Butler (1844-1910); and George Garnett (1845-1924).



Custom Field:<_FA#> 17 Jan 1775Nantwich, Cheshire
Custom Field:<_FA#> 13 Jun 1 840Acton by Nantwich, by Robert Mayer [vicar]
GARNETT, John Jasper
[1774-1840 ]
John Jasper GARNETT I was the ninth and last child of George GARNETT
and Ann SANDERS, and was probably born in the year 1774. He was
christened at Nantwich church on January 17, 1775.
John Jasper Garnett married Elizabeth CRA VEN, one of the three heiresses
of the Stoke Hall estate, which had been pur chased by Elizabeth's
father, Richard Craven in 1781 from Roger Wilbraham. John Jasper and
Elizabeth Garnett had eight children, some of whom survived into
adulthood---but with the exception of their son, John Jasper Garnett II ,
all of their other children died without leaving off-spring.
John Jasper G arnett lived in a large, somewhat modern house in the Welsh
Row, Nantwich. T he house had steps up to the front door and was nearly
opposite to the Queen' s Head.
He was a lieutenant in the Nantwich volunteer regiment, a treasurer o f
the Nantwich Bible Society in 1824, and along with two of his relations
(John Richardson and William Acton) was elected a Trustee of Wright's
Charit y in 1817.
John Jasper Garnett started a bank in partnership with Mr. Charles
Broughton [his brother in law] and another man by the name of Sprout.
Charl es Broughton was the brother of Sir John Broughton of Doddington.
The bank o pened on Saturday, November 12, 1808 in premises next to the
Griffin Inn in N antwich.
The bank stayed in operation for some eighteen years, but was force d to
close on February 13, 1826. The story goes that Charles Broughton had a n
argument with his brother, Sir John Broughton, and when the rent was due
on the bank, Sir John refused to accept the Broughton-Garnett bank
notes---t hereby causing a run on the deposits, and bringing about the
bank's closure.
Following the crash of the banking venture, John Jasper took his family
to live in Torrington Square, London where he started another business.
But a f ire put him out of business a second time.
John Jasper Garnett died at The Lod ge in Nantwich on June 6, 1840 at the
age of 65 years. Attending physician a t his death was Doctor John
Richardson, his brother-in-law. He was buried in the Garnett family tomb
at Acton church cemetery near Nantwich.
His wife, E lizabeth (Craven) Garnett continued to live in Nantwich, and
died at the age of 73-years on May 12, 1851 at the Garnett residence on
Hospital Street. Cau se of death was indicated as paralysis.
All of the family of John Jasper Garne tt died of consumption or other
diseases of a respiratory nature. Charlotte Frances Garnett died in
July, 1838 of a broken blood vessel in the lungs (po ssibly brought on by
tuberculosis).
George Garnett, the first son born to Jo hn Jasper in 1806, died of
pleurisy at the Stoke Hall estate in July, 1845.
John Jasper Garnett II (1816-1870), was also not of a strong physical
cons titution, but did live to the age of 54 years and fathered three
surviving c hildren as well as possibly two others who are believed to
have died in infa ncy. John Jasper Garnett's surviving children were:
The Reverend Richard C raven Garnett (1843-1926) ]; Elizabeth Ann Butler
(1844-1910); and George Garnett (1845-1924). 
Garnett, John Jasper (I269501)
 
26


John Jasper GARNETT II was the youngest son of John Jasper GARNETT and Elizabeth CRAVEN. As a young man he was always of delicate health, but fortunately was the one child in his family to live long enough to bear off-spring.

He married Ann ACTON [q.v. #17], daughter of James ACTON, a farmer of Wardle Hall estate and son of Thomas ACTON. This family is related to the Acton family of Alderleigh---one of the most illustrious families in English history and one that traces its ancestry back to Saxon times.

John Jasper Garnett farmed successfully at Stoke Hall estate (inherited through his mother Elizabeth Craven) for seven years. He gave up farming because his wife Ann Acton became ill. The family went to live in one of the "pretty little houses in Welsh Row", Nantwich, on the right hand side of the street going to Chester. The house was raised above the road and had grass in front. Ann Acton died there of consumption on November 6, 1848 at the age of only 30-years. She was buried November 14, 1848 at Acton.

After the premature death of his wife, John Jasper and the three children (Richard Craven, Elizabeth Ann, and George) lived for a while with John Jasper's mother (Elizabeth Craven) at Sweetbriar Hall on Hospital Street, Nantwich. Elizabeth Craven Garnett died there May 12, 1851 at age 73 of paralysis and was buried at Acton on May 20th.

After Elizabeth Garnett's death, John Jasper took his three children to live for a while in Madeira, Spain. His son, George Garnett later recounts in his family history that they travelled to Madeira in a Brig call the Comet Captive Earth and that the voyage took 17-days.

While in Spain, the children had a governess, a Miss Major, who died in Madeira. Their aunts, Mary Richardson and Ann Kent, sent out a new governess---Miss Mary Elizabeth Pankhurst who came from Wynbunbury.

This Miss Pankhurst was about 24-years of age at the time and John Jasper Garnett was about 35. Apparently they fell in love but did not marry. George Garnett's journal relates that this Miss Pankhurst was a "regular nuisance" to the three children.

John Jasper Garnett and his three children returned from Madeira around the year 1855 and for about a year rented a house in the Welsh Row on the same side of the street as the Wilbraham Arms but nearer to Chester. Aunt Mary Richardson died about this time, and so the family went to live at Stoke cottage---a smaller house on the Stoke Manor estate, which John Jasper enlarged to accommodate the family.

Around the year 1860, the Nantwich volunteer regiment was formed, and John Jasper became a lieutenant, later becoming captain of the regiment---a post which he held until his death in 1870.

John Jasper died on June 30, 1870 from a broken blood vessel in his lung. The day before his death he had driven out to John Richardson's house (The New Bell outside Nantwich), and had lunch there.

At about four o'clock in the afternoon, he was taken ill and died without warning the following day at 5:15 in the afternoon.

John Jasper Garnett is buried in the Garnett family vault in Acton churchyard near Nantwich along with his great-grandfather Samuel Garnett (1713-1777), Samuel Garnett's wife Ann Salmon (1714-1791), his grandfather George Garnett (1734-1814), his grandmother Ann Sanders (1731-1783).

The will of John Jasper Garnett of Stoke cottage was proved at the Principal Probate Registry, London on October 10, 1870. His effects amounted to less than 2,000 pounds.

In 1910, John Jasper's three children (George, Richard Craven, and Elizabeth Ann Butler) put up a brass plate to his memory in Acton Church. The inscription reads: "In memory of John Jasper Garnett of Stoke in this Parish. Died 30th June, 1870."

Of the children of John Jasper Garnett, the following is known:

Richard Craven Garnett (1843-1926) [q.v. #8] married firstly Charlotte Isabel LEACH and had eleven children---one of whom (Hubert Garnett, q.v. #4) was the grandfather of the author of this biography. He married secondly Lucy Bryans (no children from this marriage).

Elizabeth Ann Garnett (1844-1910) married John Bell BUTLER of Farringdon, Berkshire, and had three children: Margaret; William Bernard; and Geoffrey.

George Garnett (1845-1924) married Mary Eleanor CURWEN and had two daughters, Mary and Frances.



Custom Field:<_FA#> 7 Aug 1814Nantwich, Cheshire
Custom Field:<_FA#> 6 Jul 187 0Acton by Nantwich, by Robert Redfern
GARNETT, John Jasper
[1814-1870]
John Jasper GARNETT II was the youngest son of John Jasper GARNETT and
Elizabeth CRAVEN. As a young man he was always of delicate health, but
fortunately was the one child in his family to live long enough to bear
off-spring.
He marr ied Ann ACTON], daughter of James ACTON, a farmer of Wardle Hall
estate and son of Thomas ACTON. This family is related to the Acton
family of Alderleig h---one of the most illustrious families in English
history and one that trac es its ancestry back to Saxon times.
John Jasper Garnett farmed successfully a t Stoke Hall estate (inherited
through his mother Elizabeth Craven) for seven years. He gave up farming
because his wife Ann Acton became ill. The fami ly went to live in one
of the "pretty little houses in Welsh Row", Nantwich, on the right hand
side of the street going to Chester. The house was raised above the road
and had grass in front. Ann Acton died there of consumption o n November
6, 1848 at the age of only 30-years. She was buried November 14, 1848 at
Acton.
After the premature death of his wife, John Jasper and the t hree
children (Richard Craven, Elizabeth Ann, and George) lived for a while
with John Jasper's mother (Elizabeth Craven) at Sweetbriar Hall on
Hospital Street, Nantwich. Elizabeth Craven Garnett died there May 12,
1851 at age 73 of paralysis and was buried at Acton on May 20th.
After Elizabeth Garnett's death, John Jasper took his three children to
live for a while in Madeira, Spain. His son, George Garnett later
recounts in his family history that the y travelled to Madeira in a Brig
call the Comet Captive Earth and that the vo yage took 17-days.
While in Spain, the children had a governess, a Miss Major , who died in
Madeira. Their aunts, Mary Richardson and Ann Kent, sent out a new
governess---Miss Mary Elizabeth Pankhurst who came from Wynbunbury.
T his Miss Pankhurst was about 24-years of age at the time and John Jasper
Garn ett was about 35. Apparently they fell in love but did not marry.
George Ga rnett's journal relates that this Miss Pankhurst was a "regular
nuisance" to the three children.
John Jasper Garnett and his three children returned from M adeira around
the year 1855 and for about a year rented a house in the Welsh Row on the
same side of the street as the Wilbraham Arms but nearer to Cheste r.
Aunt Mary Richardson died about this time, and so the family went to live
at Stoke cottage---a smaller house on the Stoke Manor estate, which John
J asper enlarged to accommodate the family.
Around the year 1860, the Nantwich v olunteer regiment was formed, and
John Jasper became a lieutenant, later be coming captain of the
regiment---a post which he held until his death in 1870 .
John Jasper died on June 30, 1870 from a broken blood vessel in his
lung. The day before his death he had driven out to John Richardson's
house (The N ew Bell outside Nantwich), and had lunch there.
At about four o'clock in the afternoon, he was taken ill and died without
warning the following day at 5:1 5 in the afternoon.
John Jasper Garnett is buried in the Garnett family vault in Acton
churchyard near Nantwich along with his great-grandfather Samuel Gar nett
(1713-1777), Samuel Garnett's wife Ann Salmon (1714-1791), his
grand father George Garnett (1734-1814), his grandmother Ann Sanders
(1731-1783).
The will of John Jasper Garnett of Stoke cottage was proved at the
Princip al Probate Registry, London on October 10, 1870. His effects
amounted to les s than 2,000 pounds.
In 1910, John Jasper's three children (George, Richard Cr aven, and
Elizabeth Ann Butler) put up a brass plate to his memory in Acton
Church. The inscription reads: "In memory of John Jasper Garnett of
Stoke in this Parish. Died 30th June, 1870."
Of the ch 
Garnett, John Jasper (I269593)
 
27


Leda Florence [WADE] GARNETT died at age 84 years on September 3, 1962 at the Nazareth House, Bexhill, Sussex. Cause of death was cerebral thrombosis and cerebral artiorsclorosis. Certificate of death was signed by J. H. K. Mackie M.B. The informant was listed as R. Garnett, son, resident at
Ponteficio College, Beda, Viole St. Paolo 18, Rome, Italy.

Leda Florence [WADE] GARNETT died at age 84 years on September 3, 1962 at
the Nazareth House, Bexhill, Sussex. Cause of death was cerebral
thrombosis and cerebral artiorsclorosis. Certificate of death was signed
by J. H. K. Macki e M.B. The informant was listed as R. Garnett, son,
resident at
Ponteficio College, Beda, Viole St. Paolo 18, Rome, Italy. 
Wade, Leda Florence (I269648)
 
28


Major Walter Dutton Garnett- Botfield died on December 6, 1933
and was buried in the Albrighton parish churchyard.

His obituary in the Advertiser fills in the gaps of his life of guns and roses:

The remains of Major W. D. Garnett-Botfield of Beamish, Albrighton, Wolverhampton, were interred in Albrighton parish churchyard on Saturday. The deceased, who was in his 80th year, was a son of the late Mr. Garnett-Botfield of Decker Hill, Shifnal.

During the Great War he commanded the Northumbrian District, and was stationed at No. 1 Field Artillery Training School at South Camp, Ripon. He was a Justice of the Peace for Shropshire, sitting on the Shifnal Bench. He married a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs McConnel, and sister of Mrs Banister (Caynton Hall, Peckbury), by whom he is survived, together with one daughter.

The late Major Garnett-Botfield was an excellent shot, and was also very much interested in horticulture.

The funeral service was conducted by the vicar
(the Rev. G. K. M. Green). The coffin, which was covered by the Union Jack, was brought to the church by motor, being preceded by a uniformed escort of members of the Shropshire Constabulary, under Deputy Chief Constable
J. Fulcher (Wellington), Sgt Harrison (Shifnal) being second in command.

The choral service included the humns, "The King of Love," Psalm 103, and the Nunc Dimittis. The bearers were employees of the deceased officer---Messrs. F. C. Broom, R. Broom, C. Perry and J. Jordan.

The mourners included: Major and Mrs. D. F. McConnel (son-in-law and daughter), Mrs. Bannister (Caynton Hall (sister-in-law), Commander and Mrs. Bannister (nephew and niece), Mr. C. Banister (nephew), Mr. W. M. Aldersey (nephew, Bewdley), Mrs. Corbett-Winder (niece), Mrs. F. Corbett-Winder (niece), Dr. and Mrs. M. Legge (nephew and niece, Albrighton), Mr. J. I. McConnel, Mr. F.W. McConnel, Miss Carmichael (Beamish), Dr. S. B. Legge (Shifnal), Mr. E. G. Legge (Bridgnorth), Col. J. H. Howard-MacLean (Aston Hall, Shifnal)...[and many others]
Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield married Susan Katherine Houldsworth McConnel of Hale Carr, Bowdon, Cheshire on August 2, 1894. They had one daughter, Ruth, who married her cousin Major-General Douglas Fitzgerald McConnel of Heath Ends, Basingstoke on April 29, 1920.

By his will, made and signed on February 13, 1933 and probated on March 17, 1934 at Birmingham, Major W. D. Garnett-Botfield left the bulk of his estate to his wife.

His military records [from the Army List] show that he was a Major in the Royal Artillery, and retired on April 14, 1897. He later saw service in World War I.

Major Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield died on December 6, 1933
and was buried i n the Albrighton parish churchyard.
His obituary in the Advertiser fills in th e gaps of his life of guns and
roses:
The remains of Major W. D. Garnett-Bo tfield of Beamish, Albrighton,
Wolverhampton, were interred in Albrighton par ish churchyard on
Saturday. The deceased, who was in his 80th year, was a so n of the late
Mr. Garnett-Botfield of Decker Hill, Shifnal.
During the Gre at War he commanded the Northumbrian District, and was
stationed at No. 1 Fie ld Artillery Training School at South Camp,
Ripon. He was a Justice of t he Peace for Shropshire, sitting on the
Shifnal Bench. He married a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs McConnel,
and sister of Mrs Banister (Caynton Ha ll, Peckbury), by whom he is
survived, together with one daughter.
The late Major Garnett-Botfield was an excellent shot, and was also very
much interes ted in horticulture.
The funeral service was conducted by the vicar (the Rev. G. K. M.
Green). The coffin, which was covered by the Union Jack, was brough t to
the church by motor, being preceded by a uniformed escort of members of
the Shropshire Constabulary, under Deputy Chief Constable J. Fulcher
(Welli ngton), Sgt Harrison (Shifnal) being second in command.
The choral service in cluded the humns, "The King of Love," Psalm 103,
and the Nunc Dimittis. Th e bearers were employees of the deceased
officer---Messrs. F. C. Broom, R. Br oom, C. Perry and J. Jordan.
The mourners included: Major and Mrs. D. F. McCo nnel (son-in-law and
daughter), Mrs. Bannister (Caynton Hall (sister-in-law) , Commander and
Mrs. Bannister (nephew and niece), Mr. C. Banister (nephew), Mr. W. M.
Aldersey (nephew, Bewdley), Mrs. Corbett-Winder (niece), Mrs. F.
Corbett-Winder (niece), Dr. and Mrs. M. Legge (nephew and niece,
Albrig hton), Mr. J. I. McConnel, Mr. F.W. McConnel, Miss Carmichael
(Beamish), Dr. S. B. Legge (Shifnal), Mr. E. G. Legge (Bridgnorth),
Col. J. H. Howa rd-MacLean (Aston Hall, Shifnal)...[and many others]
Walter Dutton Garnett-Bo tfield married Susan Katherine Houldsworth
McConnel of Hale Carr, Bowdon, Che shire on August 2, 1894. They had one
daughter, Ruth, who married her cousi n Major-General Douglas Fitzgerald
McConnel of Heath Ends, Basingstoke on Apr il 29, 1920.
By his will, made and signed on February 13, 1933 and probated o n March
17, 1934 at Birmingham, Major W. D. Garnett-Botfield left the bulk o f
his estate to his wife.
His military records [from the Army List] show tha t he was a Major in the
Royal Artillery, and retired on April 14, 1897. He l ater saw service in
World War I. [The Army List of 1918 records that his date of birth was 16
June 1854, date of first commission in the army was 12 Febr uary 1874,
and date of substantive Major was 10 February 1891. He retired fr om the
Royal Artillery on 14 April 1897.] 
Garnett-Botfield, Walter Dutton (I270127)
 
29


Reverend William Bishton Garnett-Botfield's second wife, the former Emily Jane Wright, died just seven months before he did.

She had been a shadowy, unknown figure in our family history until her obituary was discovered in the newspaper morgue of the Wellington-Shrewsbury Journal. Although it says little about her life and personal accomplishments, it is still of interest to us for the sincere admiration and public outpouring of sympathy that occurred throughout the town of Shifnal on the occasion of her death. The obituary is also of note for the synopsis of the BOTFIELD family [much of which is incorrect] which occupies more than half of the eulogy.

The funeral of Mrs. W. B. Garnett-Botfield, whose decease was announced in the last issue of the Journal, took place in Shifnal Parish Churchyard on Monday afternoon.

The mournful cortege on its way from the hall was met near the top of High Street by the members of the deceased's Sewing Meeting, which included some of the oldest inhabitants of the town, and by a large body of tradesmen and others who joined in the procession.

The following order was observed; The hearse containing the coffin, a carriage with the bereaved husband and members of the family, mourning coach, Mr Howard McLean's carriage, another mourning coach, the servants from the hall and work people on the estate, members of the Women's Sewing Meeting, tradesmen, and the general public.

Throughout the town windows were shuttered and blinds drawn and at every point testimony was borne to the high qualities which had made the late Mrs. Garnett-Botfield beloved of everyone. The procession was met at the Parish Church by the Rev. J. Lavis-Brown (vicar) and the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield (son of the deceased), who ushered the coffin into the sacred edifice.

The hymn "For ever with the Lord" was sung by the choir and congregation, and the opening portion of the burial service was taken by the Vicar. Afterwards the hymn "Peace, perfect peace" was sung, and as the church as left Mr. R. Owen (organist) played the "Dead March".

The body was interred in a grave beautifully lined with moss and flowers. The service at the graveside was jointly conducted by the Vicar and the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield, the Rev. J. T Peters (curate) being also present.

Numerous floral emblems were placed on the coffin and grave.

The chief mourners were: the Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield husband), the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield, Mr. W. E. Garnett-Botfield (Bishop's Castle), and Major Garnett-Botfield (sons); Mr. Bardwell and Mr. Aldersey (sons-in-law), Mr. Gilmour (nephew), Mr. J. R.Howard-McLean (Aston Hall), Mr. N. Howard McLean (Donington), Mr. J. W. Brooke (Haughton Hall), Mr. A. C. Lyon (Albrighton Hall), and Mr. Harvey (agent).

[There follows at this point a long listing of other mourners and well-wishers not directly connected with the Garnett-Botfield family]

The ancient family of Botfield of Decker Hill and of Norton Hall, co. Northampton, is a branch of that formerly spelled "Botevyle", founded by Geoffrey and Oliver Botegyle, who assisted King John to war against the barons in 1210.

Fifth in descent from Sir Geoffrey was Thomas, the father of two remarkable men---John, ancestor of the Shropshire Botfields (which family is merged in these modern times, and now known as Garnett-Botfields); and William Botefelde; no other than the powerful man of old known also as William De la Inn, founder of the Thynnes, bearing the noble titles of Marquises of Bath, and other territorial lords.

The grandson of John (brother of De la Inn) was that William Botevyle of Church Stretton, whose family spread. Of these, John's son Thomas, there was a still wider extension of the family, branches of which thrived at Shrewsbury, Frodesley, and other places, until in the Stuart period, Thomas Botfield of Dawley had a son named Beriah, in 1702, just 300 [it should say 200] years ago.

Beriah's son, Thomas of Dawley and Ditton Stoke, was born on St. Valentine's Day, 1736. That gentleman took to wife, Margaret, only daughter of William Baker of Worfield, and Margaret Botfield lived right on until 1803, and her husband, Thomas Botfield lived until 1841.

Their eldest son, also named Thomas, of Decker Hill and Norton Hall, was childless, but the younger brother Beriah was father of the learned gentleman who, besides being a justice of the peace for Salop, was a Fellow of the Royal Society and of the Society of Antiquaries; was M.P. for Ludlow from 1840 to 1847, and a Chevalier of the Order of Albert the Brave of Saxony.

But his learning was against his marrying. Another younger son of Thomas and Margaret Botfield was William, the one who kept to Decker Hill, the elder being on the Northamptonshire estates.

William, son of Thomas and Margaret, was he who, by his marriage with Lucy Bishton (daughter of John Bishton of Kilsall) gave the Bishton name as a baptismal one to the Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield, who now in 1902 is again left a widower.

But this William Botfield of Decker Hill, husband of Lucy Bishton, died childless at Christmas, 1850, and his widow lived but one short year longer. Thus the brothers, William and Thomas Botfield, both died without leaving children, and the only other brother, Beriah, had, by Charlotte, daughter of Dr. Withering of Edgbaston, the son Beriah, whose learning appears to have unfitted him for the softer side of domestic life.

Here then ends the Shropshire line of the formerly powerful Botfields, whilst that descended from that oddly named "John o' th' Inne" (corrupted to Thynne) still goes on in the noble folk known as relatives of the Marquise of Bath.

The Garnetts for some generations were settled at Bunbury, Acton, and Nantwich. The Rev. William Garnett of Haughton Hall, the rector of Church Tilston (he who died in 1829), was the fortunate husband of Sophia, daughter of Mr. John Bishton of Kilsall House, Salop. The son of this rev. gentleman is the aged owner of Decker Hill---the Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield, who on Coronation Day, 1902, will enter upon his 87th year.

His mother, it will be seen, was Sophia (otherwise Elizabeth) Bishton. It was not until 1863 when he was 47 years of age, that the Rev. gentleman took the name of Botfield. This he did by Royal license, taking at the same time the Botfield arms as lodged at Heralds College, London. The date of the license is 30th Oct. 1863, and it was in compliance with the will of William Botfield, who died in 1860, leaving the Rev. gentleman the Decker Hill real estate.

The Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield, now of Decker Hill, was twice married; first on 2nd November, 1848, to Sarah, daughter of Mr. William Dutton, and secondly (his first wife having died 18th February, 1867), to Emily, daughter of Mr. Alexander Wright of Guildford Law, Dover in 1872.

This lady died 6th June, 1902. There were seven children by the first-named lady---1. William Egerton, born 16th August, 1849, who married in 1881 Elizabeth, only daughter of Mr. J. Howard McLean of Aston Hall.
He is a J.P., and lives at The Hut, Colebatch, Bishop's Castle; 2. Alfred Stanton, born 1850; 3. Walter Dutton, born 1854; 4. Charles Ramsay, born, 1868. And their three sisters are Lucy Sophia, Grace Catherine and Anne Augusta.

Emily Jane Garnett-Botfield appointed as the executors of her Will, her sister Eliza Mary Wright and her nephew Alexander Wallace Gilmour.

Under the terms of her will, she gave the following specific legacies, free of all duty:

...to the said Eliza Mary Wright, my diamond brooch;
to the said Alexander Wallace Gilmour my old silver coffee pot and silver mug; to my sister Rosa Montgomery Campbell, my diamond hoop ring and sapphire and diamond rose ring and two silver salt cellars; to my sister Alice Sophia Gilmour, my diamond and sapphire hoop ring and diamond star and two silver salt cellars; to my stepdaughter Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield, my single diamond ring and I request her to bequeath the same on her death to my goddaughter Constance Rosemary Garnett-Botfield, but it is not my intention to create or impose on her any trust condition or obligation in that behalf.

And if the said Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield shall die in my lifetime, then I bequeath to my said goddaughter Constance Rosemary Garnett-Botfield my same single diamond ring.

To my stepdaughter Annie Augusta Aldersey, my ruby ring; to my stepdaughter-in-law Susan Katharine Garnett-Botfield, my diamond and red enamel brooch;
to my stepdaughter-in-law Ida Garnett-Botfield, my signet ring and gold bangle; to my maid Margaret Cromer if she shall be in my service at the time of my death, all my wearing apparel but not including any lace attached thereto.

And as to all the remainder of my furniture, plate and plated articles, china, glass, books, prints, pictures, watches, jewels, jewellery, lace, trinkets and other articles of domestic and personal use or ornament wheresoever situate of which I may be possessed at the time of my death, I give and bequeath the same to my said sisters Eliza Mary Wright, Alice Sophia Gilmour, and Rosa Montgomery Campbell to be divided between them in as nearly as may be equal share as they shall arrange between them or in the event of the death of any of my said sisters in my lifetime then I give and bequeath the same articles to the survivors or survivor of them.

...I give and bequeath the following pecuniary legacies all free of duty: to the said Annie Augusta Aldersey and Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield the sum of one hundred pounds each; to my godchildren William Henry Coffin Bolton, Grace Frederica Bardwell, Francis Garnett Aldersey and the said Constance Rosemary Garnett-Botfield the sum of twenty pounds each...

...to my butler William Higgins if he shall be in my service at the time of my death the sum of twenty-five pounds; to my cook Martha Vaughan if she shall be in my service at the time of my death the sum of twenty-five pounds, to Kate Masters of 4 Guilford Lawn Dover the sum of twenty pounds; to Bertha Christian of 21 Carlton House Terrace London the sum of twenty pounds; to my said maid Margaret Cromer if she shall be in my service at the time of my death the sum of one hundred pounds.

In the remainder of her Will, Emily Jane Garnett-Botfield instructs her two executors and trustees to put into a trust fund any and all remaining securities, property, "the fortune settled by me on my marriage by deed" [the deed dated December 10, 1870], or inheritances due to her, and to invest such sums into a trust fund.

The income from this trust fund was to be paid to her husband during his lifetime, and after his death the trust was to be paid to her three sisters and to their children---any sons to be paid their share upon attaining the age of 21 years, and any daughters to be paid at age 21 or upon their marriage.

The will was signed and dated on December 7, 1901 in the presence of witnesses John Lavis Brown [Vicar of Shifnal] and Isabelle Ross, nurse. The will was probated on July 11, 1902 and granted to the named executors Eliza Mary Wright and Alexander Wallace Gilmour.


Reverend William Bishton Garnett-Botfield's second wife, the former Emily
Jan e Wright, died just seven months before he did.
She had been a shadowy, unkn own figure in our family history until her
obituary was discovered in the new spaper morgue of the
Wellington-Shrewsbury Journal. Although it says little about her life
and personal accomplishments, it is still of interest to us f or the
sincere admiration and public outpouring of sympathy that occurred
t hroughout the town of Shifnal on the occasion of her death. The
obituary is also of note for the synopsis of the BOTFIELD family [much of
which is incorr ect] which occupies more than half of the eulogy.
The funeral of Mrs. W. B. Garnett-Botfield, whose decease was
announced in the last issue of the Journal, took place in
Shifnal Parish Churchyard on Monday afterno on.
The mournful cortege on its way from the hall was met near the top
of H igh Street by the members of the deceased's Sewing Meeting,
which inc luded some of the oldest inhabitants of the town, and by a
large body o f tradesmen and others who joined in the procession.
The following order was observed; The hearse containing the
coffin, a carriage with the bereaved husband and members of the
family, mourning coach, Mr Howard McLean's carriage, another
mourning coach, the servants from the hall and work people on the
estate, members of the Women's Sewing Meet ing, tradesmen, and the
general public.
Throughout the town windows w ere shuttered and blinds drawn
and at every point testimony was borne t o the high qualities
which had made the late Mrs. Garnett-Botfield beloved of
everyone. The procession was met at the Parish Church b y the Rev. J.
Lavis-Brown (vicar) and the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield ( son of the
deceased), who ushered the coffin into the sacred edifice.
The hymn "For ever with the Lord" was sung by the choir and
congre gation, and the opening portion of the burial service was
taken by th e Vicar. Afterwards the hymn "Peace, perfect peace"
was sung, and a s the church as left Mr. R. Owen (organist) played the
"Dead March".
The body was interred in a grave beautifully lined with
moss and flower s. The service at the graveside was jointly
conducted by the Vicar and the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield, the Rev.
J. T Peters (curate) being als o present.
Numerous floral emblems were placed on the coffin and grave.
The chief mourners were: the Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield
husband), the Rev. C. Garnett-Botfield, Mr. W. E.
Garnett-Botfield (Bishop's C astle), and Major
Garnett-Botfield (sons); Mr. Bardwell and Mr . Aldersey
(sons-in-law), Mr. Gilmour (nephew), Mr. J. R.Howard-McL ean (Aston
Hall), Mr. N. Howard McLean (Donington), Mr. J. W. Brooke (H aughton
Hall), Mr. A. C. Lyon (Albrighton Hall), and Mr. Harvey (agent).
[There follows at this point a long listing of other mourners and
well-wi shers not directly connected with the
Garnett-Botfield family]
The ancient family of Botfield of Decker Hill and of Norton
Hall, co. Northampton, is a branch of that formerly spelled
"Botevyle", founded by Geoffrey and Oliver Botegyle, who
assisted King John to war against the barons in 1210.
Fifth in descent from Sir Geoffrey was Thomas, the father of
two remarkable men---John, ancestor of the Shropshire Botfiel ds
(which family is merged in these modern times, and now known as
Garnett-Botfields); and William Botefelde; no other than the
powerfu l man of old known also as William De la Inn, founder of
the Thynnes , bearing the noble titles of Marquises of Bath, and
other territorial lords.
The grandson of John (br 
Wright, Emily Jane (I270196)
 
30


Richard Craven GARNETT, Clerk in Holy Orders for more than 49 years, was born at 5:15 pm on February 18, 1843---the first child of John Jasper GARNETT [q.v. #16] and Ann ACTON [q.v. #17].

At the time of Richard Craven Garnett's birth, his father John Jasper was farming the estate at Stoke Hall Manor, which had been inherited by John Jasper's mother, Elizabeth Craven Garnett [q.v. #33] from her father Richard Craven upon his death in 1804.

Richard's sister Elizabeth Ann ("Lizzie") was born in 1844, followed closely by his brother George in 1845.

Just three years later, their mother Ann (Acton) Garnett died of consumption on November 6, 1848 at the age of only 30 years. Richard was only 5 years old at the time.

Following the death of his wife Ann, John Jasper took the three young children to live for a while with their grandmother Elizabeth Craven Garnett at Sweetbriar Hall on Hospital Street, Nantwich. A governess, Sarah Charlton was retained to look after the children.

In 1851, grandmother Elizabeth also died (age 73) and afterwards John Jasper and the children went to live in Madeira, Spain.

Richard's bother George later recounts in his family journal that they travelled to Spain on a brig called Comet Captive Earth and the voyage took 17 days.

The children's governess, Miss Major, died in Madeira and was replaced by a new one sent out from England---Mary Elizabeth Pankhurst, who became a "regular nuisance" to the children as well as a paramour to both John Jasper Garnett and later to the children's cousin, John Edward Richardson (from whom she swindled large sums of money and property).

Around 1855, the family returned from Spain and rented a house in the Welsh Row, Nantwich. Their great aunt, Ann Kent also died at this point and so John Jasper and the family took over a small farm house on the Stoke property, called Stoke Bank.

Richard was sent off for tutoring at Mr. Grosvenor's boarding school. He went on to study at Trinity College, Cambridge where he received a B.A. in 1866 and and M.A. in 1869.

Upon graduation, Richard Craven Garnett entered the ministry, first as a curate of Leck in Lancashire, then at Mansfield- Woodhouse, Nottinghamshire. He was ordained Deacon in 1867 and Priest at Manchester Cathedral in 1869.

On July 20, 1871, the Reverend Richard C. Garnett married Charlotte Isabel LEACH, daughter of Thomas LEACH of Thornton in Lonsdale. The same year, he was made curate of Calveley-under-Bunbury where he and his wife resided until 1873. At Bunbury their first two children were born---Ann Craven Garnett on May 3, 1872, and John Jasper on May 2, 1873.

From 1873 to 1889, Reverend Garnett was Rector of Delamere, and it was there that Kate (August 11, 1874), Marion (October 2, 1875) and Craven (August 5, 1877) were born.

While at Delamere the family also suffered a heartbreaking tragedy when the two oldest of their children, Ann (age 7) and John Jasper (age 6) both died within weeks of eachother in June 1879 from diphtheria. A stained glass window in Delamere Church commemorates the tragic death of these two children.

Between March, 1880 and November, 1888 the remaining six Garnett children came into the world in quick succession, all at Delamere: George Edmund on March 12, 1880; Hubert on November 28, 1881, Charlotte Octavia on January 29, 1883; Acton on August 22, 1884; Ruth on April 11, 1886; and Isabel on November 28, 1888.

In 1889, Reverend Garnett was appointed Vicar of Settle in North Yorkshire, a position he held until 1901. It was at Settle that the children grew up, went to school, made friends and decided their future vocations in life.

And it was also at Settle that Garnett's wife Charlotte died on April 6, 1893 at the young age of 43. Cause of death was recorded as influenza, pneumonia and acute rheumatic endocarditis. She was buried in the churchyard at Settle.

A few years after the death of his first wife, Reverend Garnett met Lucy BRYANS [q.v. #9-2], daughter of William Bryans a fellow Church of England clergyman. They were married at the Parish Church of Eltham in the county of London on February 1, 1900.

Lucy, age 37 at the time of the marriage was 20 years younger than the groom.

Reverend Richard Craven Garnett was Rector of St. Michael's Church at Salwarpe, Droitwich from 1901 to 1916.

When he retired from that post in October, 1916 at the age of 73, he was presented with a handsome Sheraton sideboard enscribed with a brass plate bearing the following inscription:

"Presented to the Rev. R.C. Garnett, M.A., by the people of Salwarpe, on his leaving after 15 years ministry in the parish, October 7, 1916."

The presentation ceremony was written up in the Berrows Worchester Journal on October 11, 1916. Mrs. Lucy Garnett was presented with a silver coffee pot engraved on one side with her initials "L.G." Miss Kate Garnett was presented with a suitcase and Miss Marion Garnett (in appreciation for her efficient work with the choir) was given a case of fish eaters and carvers.

The Reverend Garnett lived another ten years in retirement, succuming on March 3, 1926 after an attack of Haut Mal and Coma. He died at The Hayes, Park Road, Chandlers Ford, Winchester, County of Southhampton. His son Craven Garnett, living at East Mead Avenue, Greenford, Middlesex, was listed as informant on the death certificate.

Of the children of Richard Craven Garnett, the following information is known:

Ann Craven Garnett and John Jasper Garnett died at the ages of 7 and 6 respectively as a result of a diptheria outbreak in June, 1879.

Kate Garnett died unmarried at New Baskerville, Shubbery, Worchester on about November 10, 1943 at age 69.

Marion Garnett died also unmarried on March 5, 1967. She was living at the time in Oxford, at 28 Bickerton Road Headington, having undergone care at the Gilmore Home for the elderly. Funeral arrangements from S. W. French and Son, with instructions in her Will that she be cremated.

Craven Garnett married Winifred Marion Harry and had two sons: George Evelyn Durant Garnett (b. 1909), and Craven Llewellyn Garnett [died 22 Sept. 1945]. Craven Garnett was a civil engineer and was living in Greenford, Middlesex at the time of his father's death in 1926. He died on October 26, 1955 at age 78 in Settle, Yorkshire of a cerebral haemorrhage, and his wife Winifred Marion Garnett died just a few weeks later on December 12, 1955.

George Edmund Garnett married Leda Florence WADE on December 22, 1903 and had two children: Richard (b. May 5, 1907), and Hubert Edmund (1908-1924). He died February 22, 1912 and was buried at Salwarpe.

Hubert Garnett [q.v. #4] married Ethel Mairi CLAYTON of Settle, North Yorkshire and emigrated to Canada in the early 1900s. He lived near Montreal for the rest of his life, being employed for over 25 years with the Explosives Division of Canadian Industries Limited (CIL). He died July 11, 1977 at Lachute, Quebec and was buried at St. James Anglican Church. Hudson Heights. He left three surviving children: Nancy Isobel LUSBY, Edmund Jasper Garnett and Geoffrey Garnett] and eight grandchildren.

Charlotte Octavia Garnett died unmarried at the age of 91 on April 25, 1974.
At the time of her death, she was a resident of the Greengates Home located at 2 Hernes Road, Oxford.

Acton Garnett was an agriculturist who died of tuberculosis at the age of 49 years on March 8, 1934 at Nordach Sanitorium, Ubley, Somerset. Until shortly before his death, Acton Garnettt lived with his sister Ruth in Headington, Oxford.

Ruth Garnett became a pharmacist by profession. She lived at 28 Bickerton Road, Headington, Oxford following the death of her brother Acton Garnett in 1934. She died at Oxford on April 13, 1966.

Isabel Garnett, a Roman Catholic Nun, was a missionary in China for a number of years. She became blind. Later she moved to the United States where she taught braile at a school for the blind in Maine. She died January 12, 1972 and is believed to be buried in Arlington, Massachusetts.




Custom Field:<_FA#> 27 Feb 1843Acton by Nantwich, by Robt. Mayer, Vicar
GARNET T, Richard Craven
[1843-1926]
Richard Craven GARNETT, Clerk in Holy Orders fo r more than 49 years, was
born at 5:15 pm on February 18, 1843---the first c hild of John Jasper
GARNETT and Ann ACTON.
At the time of Richard Craven Ga rnett's birth, his father John Jasper
was farming the estate at Stoke Hall M anor, which had been inherited by
John Jasper's mother, Elizabeth Craven Gar nett from her father Richard
Craven upon his death in 1804.
Richard's siste r Elizabeth Ann ("Lizzie") was born in 1844, followed
closely by his brother George in 1845.
Just three years later, their mother Ann (Acton) Garnett die d of
consumption on November 6, 1848 at the age of only 30 years. Richard wa s
only 5 years old at the time.
Following the death of his wife Ann, John J asper took the three young
children to live for a while with their grandmothe r Elizabeth Craven
Garnett at Sweetbriar Hall on Hospital Street, Nantwich. A governess,
Sarah Charlton was retained to look after the children.
In 185 1, grandmother Elizabeth also died (age 73) and afterwards John
Jasper and t he children went to live in Madeira, Spain.
Richard's bother George later reco unts in his family journal that they
travelled to Spain on a brig called Come t Captive Earth and the voyage
took 17 days.
The children's governess, Miss Major, died in Madeira and was replaced by
a new one sent out from England--- Mary Elizabeth Pankhurst, who became a
"regular nuisance" to the children as well as a paramour to both John
Jasper Garnett and later to the children's c ousin, John Edward
Richardson (from whom she swindled large sums of money a nd property).
Around 1855, the family returned from Spain and rented a house in the
Welsh Row, Nantwich. Their great aunt, Ann Kent also died at this po int
and so John Jasper and the family took over a small farm house on the
S toke property, called Stoke Bank.
Richard was sent off for tutoring at Mr. Gro svenor's boarding school. He
went on to study at Trinity College, Cambridge w here he received a B.A.
in 1866 and and M.A. in 1869.
Upon graduation, Rich ard Craven Garnett entered the ministry, first as a
curate of Leck in Lancash ire, then at Mansfield- Woodhouse,
Nottinghamshire. He was ordained Deacon in 1867 and Priest at Manchester
Cathedral in 1869.
On July 20, 1871, the Reverend Richard C. Garnett married Charlotte
Isabel LEACH, daughter of Thomas LEACH of Thornton in Lonsdale. The same
year, he was made curate of Calveley-under-Bunbury where he and his wife
resided until 1873. At Bunbury their first two children were born---Ann
Craven Garnett on May 3, 1872, and John Jasper on May 2, 1873.
From 1873 to 1889, Reverend Garnett was Rector of Delamere , and it was
there that Kate (August 11, 1874), Marion (October 2, 1875) and Craven
(August 5, 1877) were born.
While at Delamere the family also suffer ed a heartbreaking tragedy when
the two oldest of their children, Ann (age 7) and John Jasper (age 6)
both died within weeks of eachother in June 1879 from diphtheria. A
stained glass window in Delamere Church commemorates the tragic death of
these two children.
Between March, 1880 and November, 1888 the remaining six Garnett children
came into the world in quick succession, all a t Delamere: George Edmund
on March 12, 1880; Hubert on November 28, 1881, Charlotte Octavia on
January 29, 1883; Acton on August 22, 1884; Ruth on Ap ril 11, 1886;
and Isabel on November 28, 1888.
In 1889, Reverend Garnett w as appointed Vicar of Settle in North
Yorkshire, a position he held until 19 01. It was at Settle that the
children grew up, went to school, made friends and decided their future
vocations in life.
And it was also at Settle that Garnett's wife Charlotte died on April 6,
1893 at the young age of 43. Ca use of death was recorded as influenza,
pneumonia. 
Garnett, Richard Craven (I269616)
 
31


The fourth child of William Bishton Garnett-Botfield and Sarah Dutton, a girl, was born in 1853 in Findon, Sussex.

On April 29, 1880 Lucy Sophia Garnett-Botfield married Thomas Newman Frederick Bardwell of Bolton Hall in Yorkshire. She died intestate on November 20, 1899 at age 46 years. Letters of Administration were granted by the High Court of Justice, York, on March 15, 1900.

Gross value of her estate was L1,053 with a net personal value of L883-2s-2d, but was subsequently resworn in October of 1903 at a revised value of L1,691-9s-2d.

The Administration papers read:

Lucy Sophia Bardwell (wife of Thomas Newman Frederick Bardwell ) of Bolton Hall, Wilberfoss in the County of York deceased, who died on the 20th day of November 1899 at Bolton Hall aforesaid, intestate, and who at the time of her death, had a fixed place of abode at Bolton Hall aforesaid within the District of the North and East Ridings of the County of York including the City of York and Ainsly thereof were granted by Her Majesty's High Court of Justice at the District Probate Registry thereof at York to the said Thomas Newman Frederick Bardwell of Bolton Hall aforesaid Esquire the lawful Husband of the said intestate.


The fourth child of William Bishton Garnett-Botfield and Sarah Dutton, a
girl , was born in 1853 in Findon, Sussex.
On April 29, 1880 Lucy Sophia Garnett-B otfield married Thomas Newman
Frederick Bardwell of Bolton Hall in Yorkshire. She died intestate on
November 20, 1899 at age 46 years. Letters of Admini stration were
granted by the High Court of Justice, York, on March 15, 1900.
Gross value of her estate was L1,053 with a net personal value of
L883-2s-2d , but was subsequently resworn in October of 1903 at a revised
value of L1,6 91-9s-2d.
The Administration papers read:
Lucy Sophia Bardwell (wife of Tho mas Newman
Frederick Bardwell ) of Bolton Hall, Wilberfoss in the County
of York deceased, who died on the 20th day of No vember 1899 at
Bolton Hall aforesaid, intestate, and who at the time o f her
death, had a fixed place of abode at Bolton Hall aforesaid with in
the District of the North and East Ridings of the County of
Yo rk including the City of York and Ainsly thereof were granted
by Her Majesty's High Court of Justice at the District Probate
Registry thereof at York to the said Thomas Newman Frederick
Bardwell of Bolton H all aforesaid Esquire the lawful Husband
of the said intestate. 
Garnett-Botfield, Lucy Sophia (I270013)
 
32


The life and passion of Thomas Aldersey was as precise and
well-measured as a gold watch. He was a cautious, careful, and devote man...as his obituary amply demonstrates:


The death occurred on Monday of Mr. Thomas Aldersey, aged 75, late of The Cottage Park Street, at the home of his son (Mr. Walter Corbett Aldersey) at Chaddesley Corbett Kidderminster.

The late Mr. Aldersey was a son of Thomas Aldersey of Aldersey Hall, near Chester. He married the youngest daughter of the late Rev. Garnett-Botfield, Decker Hill.

Mr. Aldersey many years ago left England for Iowa, America, and was there for seven years. He returned to England and lived in Shrewsbury where he became inspector of weights and measures, and after the war, he moved to The Cottage, Shifnal, where he lived until a short time after the death of his wife.

He then went to live with his son at Kidderminster and was with him for about two years.

Mr. Aldersey was an ardent worker on behalf of Shifnal Parish Church and held many of its honorary offices.

The funeral service took place at Shifnal Church on Thursday, when the officiating minister was the vicar (Rev. J. H. Hall). The service was fully choral. The committal service was taken by the vicar. The mourners included Mr. and Mrs. W. C. [M] Aldersey (son and daughter-in-law), the Sister Mary Veronica of the Convent of the Holy Cross, Hayward's Heath, Sussex (daughter), Capt. and Mrs. Ralph Aldersey, Mr. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder,
Dr. and Mrs Melville Legge (nephew and niece).

A copy of Thomas Aldersey's will is on record at the local probate office in Shrewsbury. In the opening paragraphs of the will, he appoints his son, Walter Massie Aldersey of Holloway House, Chaddesley Corbett, Worcester and Charles Valentine Carlisle of Bedford Square, London as his executors and trustees.

He then names the following beneficiaries:

I give the following legacies free of legacy duty, namely:

(a) To my son Thomas Frances Garnett Aldersey my gold watch chain, my gold rings and all my other jewellery, trinkets and personal ornaments.

(b) To the said Walter Massie Aldersey, all the silver and other articles which he has from time to time given to me

(c) To my daughter Gladys Valentine Aldersey, the sum of Fifty pounds as a small appreciation of her love and goodness to her Mother and me

(d) To Mary Heighway, if in my service at my death, and not under notice to leave whether given or received the sum of Ten pounds

(e) To the Shifnal Cottage Hospital all my wearing apparel it being my wish that it shall be sold and that the proceeds shall be applied for the benefit of the Nurses Pension Fund of the said Hospital.

I give to the said Gladys Valentine Aldersey free of all death duties that may be payable in respect thereof at my death an annuity of Sixteen pounds for her life to begin from my death and to be payable by equal quarterly payments the first payment thereof to be made at the expiration of three calendar months from my death.

I direct my Trustees to set apart as soon as conveniently may be and invest in their names with power to vary investments, a sum the income of whereof when invested shall be sufficient at the time of investment to pay the said annuity and to pay the same accordingly with power to resort to the capital of the appropriated fund whenever the income shall be insufficient, And until such sum shall be so appropriated I charge my residuary personal estate with the said annuity but after appropriation my residuary estate shall thereby be discharged from the said annuity...

I give to the said Walter Massie Aldersey free of all duty all my interest in the freehold property known as The Cottage, Shifnal in the County of Salop and all my interest in the furniture, chattels, and effects in or upon the said property except those hereinbefore specifically mentioned and except money and securities for money...

In witness whereof I the said Thomas Aldersey have to this my Will set my hand this third day of September One thousand nine hundred and thirty one.

The Will of Thomas Aldersey was written just six months after the departure of his wife, Annie Augusta who died on March 8, 1931 at Church Stretton.


ALDERSEY, Thomas
[1860-1935]
The life and passion of Thomas Aldersey was as precise and well-measured
as a gold watch. He was a cautious, careful, and de vote man...as his
obituary amply demonstrates:
"...The death occurred on Mon day of Mr. Thomas Aldersey, aged 75, late of
The Cottage Park Street, at the home of his son (Mr. Walter Corbett
Aldersey) at Chaddesley Corbett Kiddermin ster.
The late Mr. Aldersey was a son of Thomas Aldersey of Aldersey Hall,
near Chester. He married the youngest daughter of the late Rev.
Garnett-Bot field, Decker Hill.
Mr. Aldersey many years ago left England for Iowa, America , and was there
for seven years. He returned to England and lived in Shrewsb ury where he
became inspector of weights and measures, and after the war, he moved to
The Cottage, Shifnal, where he lived until a short time after the d eath
of his wife.
He then went to live with his son at Kidderminster and was with him for
about two years.
Mr. Aldersey was an ardent worker on behalf of Shifnal Parish Church and
held many of its honorary offices.
The funer al service took place at Shifnal Church on Thursday, when the
officiating min ister was the vicar (Rev. J. H. Hall). The service was
fully choral. The co mmittal service was taken by the vicar. The
mourners included Mr. and Mrs. W . C. [M] Aldersey (son and
daughter-in-law), the Sister Mary Veronica of the Convent of the Holy
Cross, Hayward's Heath, Sussex (daughter), Capt. and Mrs . Ralph
Aldersey, Mr. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder, Dr. and Mrs Melville Legge
(nephew and niece).
A copy of Thomas Aldersey's will is on record at the loca l probate office
in Shrewsbury. In the opening paragraphs of the will, he ap points his
son, Walter Massie Aldersey of Holloway House, Chaddesley Corbett,
Worcester and Charles Valentine Carlisle of Bedford Square, London as
his executors and trustees.
He then names the following beneficiaries:
I give t he following legacies free of legacy duty, namely:
(a) To my son Thomas France s Garnett Aldersey my gold watch chain, my
gold rings and all my other jewell ery, trinkets and personal ornaments.
(b) To the said Walter Massie Aldersey, all the silver and other articles
which he has from time to time given to me
(c) To my daughter Gladys Valentine Aldersey, the sum of Fifty pounds as
a s mall appreciation of her love and goodness to her Mother and me
(d) To Mary He ighway, if in my service at my death, and not under notice
to leave whether g iven or received the sum of Ten pounds
(e) To the Shifnal Cottage Hospital all my wearing apparel it being my
wish that it shall be sold and that the proce eds shall be applied for the
benefit of the Nurses Pension Fund of the said H ospital.
I give to the said Gladys Valentine Aldersey free of all death dutie s
that may be payable in respect thereof at my death an annuity of Sixteen
pounds for her life to begin from my death and to be payable by equal
quarter ly payments the first payment thereof to be made at the expiration
of three c alendar months from my death.
I direct my Trustees to set apart as soon as con veniently may be and
invest in their names with power to vary investments, a sum the income of
whereof when invested shall be sufficient at the time of in vestment to
pay the said annuity and to pay the same accordingly with power t o resort
to the capital of the appropriated fund whenever the income shall be
insufficient, And until such sum shall be so appropriated I charge
my residuary personal estate with the said annuity but after
appropriation my r esiduary estate shall thereby be discharged from the
said annuity...
I give to the said Walter Massie Aldersey free of all duty all my
interest in the fr eehold property known as The Cottage, Shifnal in the
County of Salop and all my interest in the furniture, chattels, and
effects in or upon the said prope rty except those hereinbefore
specifically ment 
Aldersey, Thomas (I270030)
 
33


The Reverend Charles Ramsay Garnett-Botfield was the seventh child and youngest son of the Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield. In point of fact, he was born on May 7, 1858 at Bunbury, Cheshire while his father was still the Preacher of St. Boniface Church, and before the Garnett family had succeeded to the Botfield name and fortune.

Charles Ramsay Garnett-Botfield grew up in the lap of luxury. The family moved to the mansion at Decker Hill when he was but a lad of six. He was educated at Harrow and Magdalen College, Oxford where he took an M.A. in 1884. He entered the ministry and became Vicar of Moreton, Oswestry in the county of Salop.

From the Wellington Journal, which published his obituary on September 24, 1932 [five days following his death] we can now outline a much clearer sketch of the man, his life and loves...

The death occurred at a nursing home in Colwyn Bay on Monday [September 19, 1932] of the Rev. Charles Ramsay Garnett-Botfield, of Rhos-on-Sea, and formerly vicar of Moreton for many years.

Deceased, who was 74 years of age, was born at Decker Hill, Shifnal [the location of his birth given here is incorrect] being a member of a well-known Shropshire family. He was educated at Harrow, and graduated an M.A. of Magdalen College, Oxford.

In his early years he was curate of Rochdale, and after a period under the Dean of Manchester, he was given a living at Adwick, Yorkshire, in 1888.

In 1893 he succeeded the late Rev. W. E. Price at Moreton, where he remained until 1929, when he was succeeded by the present vicar, the Rev. F.A. Owen.

Deceased is survived by one brother, Mr. Walter Garnett-Botfield, Albrighton; one son, Mr Jack Garnett-Botfield, Victoria, Australia; two daughters,
Mrs. Legge, Albrighton and Miss Evelyn Garnett-Botfield (who resided with him at Rhos-on-Sea), and one grandson in Australia. Capt. C. S. [Sidney] Garnett-Botfield (son) was killed in the Great War [at the close of 1914].

In his younger days, deceased was a keen athlete and gloried in a game of Rugger. He could shoot with the best and was also very fond of following the hounds. Fishing also greatly attracted him and for many years he had the lease on Livnelys Pool. Among his many hobbies must be included floriculture: he was, in fact a specialist where roses were concerned, and in the springtime the Moreton Vicarage gardens were always a mass of tulips, daffodils, narcissi and crocuses.

He was very fond of children, and many of the young men of Moreton will remember the time when he allowed them the use of his paddock and orchard. Rain, hail, or snow,
he was always the keenest spectator at the school football matches.

He had a keen ear for music, as well as being a candid critic of the church choir, he delighted in periodically coming over to the Moreton School and asking Mr. Cecil Evans, then headmaster of Moreton, to ask the children to sing the old Harrow school song, "Forty Years On".

His greatest interest was, however, always his church. Every Saturday afternoon he would visit the church and put everything in readiness for the Sunday, and he always took a big part in the decorations of the church.

With Mr. Cecil Evans, he was a prime mover in the providing of Moreton School playing field; and it was always his wish that a village institute should be built on the ground.

For many years he was partially incapacitated, and towards the close his infirmities became greater, his retirement being on the grounds of ill-health.

The funeral took place at the family grave at Moreton, on Thursday. In the morning the school flag was flown at half-mast in his memory. The choir, under the leadership of Mr. A. D. Narraway, was in attendance, and the organist, Mr. Francis W. Williams, played appropriate music. Included in the service was deceased's favourite hymn: "Abide with Me", the Nune Dimittis (in place of the psalm), and "O rest in the Lord".

The service was conducted by the Rev. F. Owen, who was assisted by the Rev. W. Armour (Knutsford) and the Rev. E. Evans (vicar of Holy Trinity, Oswestry). Other clergy present were the Rev. Poole Hughes (Llanvmynech), the Rev. J. Allen Jones (Llanyblodwel), the Rev. A. C. Roberts (Kinnerley).

The mourners were Dr. and Mrs. Melville Legge (son-in- law and daughter), Mr. T. Aldersey, Shifnal (brother-in-law), Major and Mrs. Garnett-Botfield (brother and sister-in-law), Capt. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder, Berriew (nephew and niece), Mr. G. Legg and Nurse Oliver.

[There follows here a long list of other mourners who attended the funeral]



Custom Field:<_FA#> 31 May 1858Bunbury, Cheshire, ENGLAND
GARNETT-BOTFIELD, Ch arles Ramsay [Rev.]
[1858-1932]
The Reverend Charles Ramsay Garnett-Botfield was the seventh child and
youngest son of the Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Bo tfield. In point of
fact, he was born on May 7, 1858 at Bunbury, Cheshire w hile his father
was still the Preacher of St. Boniface Church, and before the Garnett
family had succeeded to the Botfield name and fortune.
Charles Ra msay Garnett-Botfield grew up in the lap of luxury. The family
moved to the mansion at Decker Hill when he was but a lad of six. He was
educated at Harr ow and Magdalen College, Oxford where he took an M.A. in
1884. He entered th e ministry and became Vicar of Moreton, Oswestry in
the county of Salop.
Fro m the Wellington Journal, which published his obituary on September
24, 1932 [five days following his death] we can now outline a much
clearer sketch of the man, his life and loves...
The death occurred at a nursing home in Col wyn Bay on Monday [September
19, 1932] of the Rev. Charles Ramsay Garnett-B otfield, of Rhos-on-Sea,
and formerly vicar of Moreton for many years.
Dece ased, who was 74 years of age, was born at Decker Hill, Shifnal [the
locatio n of his birth given here is incorrect] being a member of a
well-known Shrop shire family. He was educated at Harrow, and graduated
an M.A. of Magdalen C ollege, Oxford.
In his early years he was curate of Rochdale, and after a peri od under
the Dean of Manchester, he was given a living at Adwick, Yorkshire, in
1888.
In 1893 he succeeded the late Rev. W. E. Price at Moreton, where he
remained until 1929, when he was succeeded by the present vicar, the Rev.
F.A. Owen.
Deceased is survived by one brother, Mr. Walter Garnett-Botfield,
Albrighton; one son, Mr Jack Garnett-Botfield, Victoria, Australia;
t wo daughters, Mrs. Legge, Albrighton and Miss Evelyn Garnett-Botfield
(who resided with him at Rhos-on-Sea), and one grandson in Australia.
Capt. C. S. [Sidney] Garnett-Botfield (son) was killed in the Great War
[at the close o f 1914].
In his younger days, deceased was a keen athlete and gloried in a gam e of
Rugger. He could shoot with the best and was also very fond of followin g
the hounds. Fishing also greatly attracted him and for many years he had
the lease on Livnelys Pool. Among his many hobbies must be included
floricu lture: he was, in fact a specialist where roses were concerned,
and in the s pringtime the Moreton Vicarage gardens were always a mass of
tulips, daffodi ls, narcissi and crocuses.
He was very fond of children, and many of the yo ung men of Moreton
will remember the time when he allowed them the use of his paddock and
orchard. Rain, hail, or snow, he was always the keenest spe ctator at the
school football matches.
He had a keen ear for music, as well as being a candid critic of the
church choir, he delighted in periodically c oming over to the Moreton
School and asking Mr. Cecil Evans, then headmaste r of Moreton, to ask
the children to sing the old Harrow school song, "Forty Years On".
His greatest interest was, however, always his church. Every Satur day
afternoon he would visit the church and put everything in readiness for
the Sunday, and he always took a big part in the decorations of the
church.
With Mr. Cecil Evans, he was a prime mover in the providing of Moreton
Schoo l playing field; and it was always his wish that a village
institute should be built on the ground.
For many years he was partially incapacitated, and tow ards the close his
infirmities became greater, his retirement being on the gr ounds of
ill-health.
The funeral took place at the family grave at Moreton, on Thursday. In
the morning the school flag was flown at half-mast in his me mory. The
choir, under the leadership of Mr. A. D. Narraway, was in attenda nce,
and the organist, Mr. Francis W. Williams, 
Garnett-Botfield, Charles Ramsey (I270128)
 
34


The second son after William Egerton Garnett-Botfield , born on September 25, 1850 never married and died at age 41 in 1891. Alfred Stanton Garnett-Botfield attended Rugby and Brasenose College and later took a B.A. from Oxford.

Administration papers for his estate were granted on February 19, 1891. The gross value of his personal effects was L3,181-3s-3d. The estate was resworn in December, 1895 at a revised value of L3,333-18s-1d.


The second son after William Egerton Garnett-Botfield , born on September
25, 1850 never married and died at age 41 in 1891. Alfred Stanton
Garnett-Botfie ld attended Rugby and Brasenose College and later took a
B.A. from Oxford.
A dministration papers for his estate were granted on February 19, 1891.
The gross value of his personal effects was L3,181-3s-3d. The estate
was resworn in December, 1895 at a revised value of L3,333-18s-1d. 
Garnett-Botfield, Alfred Stanton (I270011)
 
35


Vera Dorothy Garnett-Botfield, widow of William McLean Garnett-Botfield, died on September 7, 1967 [at age 56] at St. Peters Hospital, Chertsey, Surrey. She was living with her brother at time of death at
19 Walton Park, Walton, Surrey and was listed as "of independent means". She died three weeks after a thyroidectomy operation, her death caused by an attack of bilateral pneumonia and myasthenia gravis. Informant was her brother John Wrangle Hetherington.

Mrs. Garnett-Botfield, unlike her husband, did leave a will. It was written on September 13, 1962---a year and four months after the death of her husband, and probated on November 27, 1967 at London. She left personal effects valued at only L5,808 and the letters of probate were issued to her executor---her brother John Wrangle Hetherington, an engineer.

According to the terms of Mrs Garnett-Botfield's will, she bequeathed her eyes to the Royal Eye Hospital to be used for therapeutic purposes, and her body was made available for anatomical examination and scientific experimentation.

After debts and funeral expenses, the residue of her possessions was bequeathed to her mother Florence Mabel Hetherington.

Nothing else of the Garnett-Botfield family or fortunes seems to have remained after the death of "Billie" Garnett-Botfield and his wife.

They were the very last of the GARNETT- BOTFIELDs in captivity---the end of the line. With them died the dynasty and the name.


Vera Dorothy Garnett-Botfield, widow of William McLean Garnett-Botfield,
die d on September 7, 1967 [at age 56] at St. Peters Hospital,
Chertsey, Surrey . She was living with her brother at time of death at
19 Walton Park, Walto n, Surrey and was listed as "of independent
means". She died three weeks af ter a thyroidectomy operation, her death
caused by an attack of bilateral pne umonia and myasthenia gravis.
Informant was her brother John Wrangle Hetheri ngton.
Mrs. Garnett-Botfield, unlike her husband, did leave a will. It wa s
written on September 13, 1962---a year and four months after the death of
her husband, and probated on November 27, 1967 at London. She left
person al effects valued at only L5,808 and the letters of probate were
issued to he r executor---her brother John Wrangle Hetherington, an
engineer.
Accordin g to the terms of Mrs Garnett-Botfield's will, she bequeathed
her eyes to th e Royal Eye Hospital to be used for therapeutic purposes,
and her body was m ade available for anatomical examination and scientific
experimentation.
A fter debts and funeral expenses, the residue of her possessions was
bequeathe d to her mother Florence Mabel Hetherington.
Nothing else of the Garnett-Botfi eld family or fortunes seems to have
remained after the death of "Billie" Gar nett-Botfield and his wife.
They were the very last of the GARNETT- BOTFIELD s in captivity---the end
of the line. With them died the dynasty and the name 
Hetherington, Vera Dorothy (I270135)
 
36


When William Egerton Garnett-Botfield married Elizabeth Clulow Howard- McLean the celebration overtook the entire countryside around Shifnal.

This happy event, which unites the two houses of Decker Hill and Aston Hall, Shifnal, in the persons of the son and heir of the former, and the only daughter of the latter, took place on Thursday morning last, at Sheriffhales Church.

It would not be easy to overrate the esteem felt in Shifnal for both families, and the union of the heir of the one to the beautiful and accomplished young member of the other excited the greatest possible interest. This was manifested in the extraordinary number and value of the marriage presents which came from all classes, and in the number of visitors to Sheriffhales to witness the ceremony.

The morning broke beautifully fine, the sun shining out as it had not done lately. The streets were fully peopled and gay with flags, banners, and arches, bearing mottoes of goodwill. Aston Street, leading to the hall, was perhaps most thickly occupied, though High Street and the Market Place bore a large share. The start was made from Aston Hall at 10 o'clock in nine carriages, with positions and grey horses, making a splendid appearance, the bride, in the last, escorted by her father, Mr. J. Howard McLean. Sheriffhales Church, three miles distant, was soon reached, and here was such a gathering of neighbours from all around, and such a crowd inside the church, as was a sight of itself, to such as were fortunate enough to gain a place. The pathway to the church was laid with red cloth, and lined with old and young people of both sexes eager to obtain a good sight of the bridal party on its alighting at its destination, and again when the ceremony was concluded.


The excitement of expectancy was very evident amongst those inside the church as the wedding party entered, and, as it got into full view, that feeling of course gave way to those pleasant sensations of interest and gratified curiosity which are surely inevitable on such a happy occasion as this, in the feminine constitution especially. The bride was naturally the first object of interest, and then her four fair attendants, and (shall it be said?) perchance their dresses. Miss Garnett-Botfield, Miss A. Garnett-Botfield (sisters of the bridegroom), Miss Howard and Miss E. Howard, of Boughton Hall, Cheshire (cousins of the bride), were the bridesmaids, and Mr. A. G. Botfield [Alfred Garnett-Botfield] (the bridegroom's brother) "best man."

The dress of the bride was of rich brocade satin, trimmed with Brussels lace with pearls and orange blossoms, orange floral wreath, and Brussels lace veil. She also wore a diamond locket, the gift of her father; a pearl locket, the gift of the bridegroom; and a pearl suite, the gift of her mother.

The bridesmaids' dresses were of pale blue plush and brocade, with plush hats, and pendants, the gift of the bridegroom. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield (father of the bridegroom), assisted by the Rev. C. R. Bradburne (the vicar of Sheriffhales). The register was signed, "W. E. Garnett-Botfield", "E.C. Howard McLean", "Helen E. Howard McLean",
"Robert Howard", "T. N. F. Bardwell", and "John Howard McLean".

The return journey was speedily commenced after the ceremony, amidst the ringing of bells, and connon-firing reports, and at Aston Hall more than 50 guests partook of the magnificent dejeuner provided. The ladies and gentlemen invited including Mr. and Mrs Howard McLean, Rev. W. B. and Mrs. Garnett-Botfield, Captain and Mrs. Garnett, Lady Macdonald Lockhart, Miss and Sir S. Macdonald Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. E. Dutton, Miss Dutton, Mrs Latham Bailey, Miss Bailey, Mr. J. L. Bailey, Mr Lt. C. Bailey, Mr and Mrs. Bardwell,
Mr. Hector McLean, Mr. and Mrs J. Dutton, Mr. and Mrs.Fitzgerald, Miss Fitzgerald, Mr. and Mrs McLean, Mr. J.R. Howard McLean, Mr. N. W. Howard McLean,
Mr A. Garnett-Botffield, Mr. C. Garnett Botfield, Rec. C.
and Mrs Bradburne, Miss E. Smith, Mr. Moreton Wood, Miss A.A. Garnett-Botfield, Miss Garnett-Botfield,
Mr. Cullimore.

The health of the happy pair, proposed by the Rev. C. R. Bradburne, was enthusiastically honoured, and also the health of the bridesmaids, proposed by Sir Simon Macdonald Lockhard and other toasts.

The happy pair took their departure from Shifnal Station by the 2:40 train, en route for the Continent.

[a long list of well-wishers and their wedding gifts is here included in the newspaper report]


Fifteen years after the death of William Egerton Garnett-Botfield, his widow followed him into the family vault in the churchyard at Bishop's Castle.

From her obituary, which appeared in the local Newport and Market Drayton newspaper, we get a brief glimpse of her life, from her wedding until her death.

The death of Mrs E. C. Garnett-Botfield, widow of
Mr. W. E. Garnett-Botfield, The Hut, Bishop's Castle, and Decker Hill, Shifnal, took place on Thursday last week at Vaynor Park, Berriew, the residence of Major F. F. and Mrs. Corbett-Winder (son-in-law and daughter), at the age of 59 years.

The deceased lady was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs Howard McLean, Aston Hall, Shifnal. Mr. Garnett- Botfield died in April, 1906, six weeks after the celebration of their silver wedding.

There were two sons---Mr. Wm. McLean Garnett-Botfield and Lieut. Clulow Garnett-Botfield (who died early in the war)---and one daughter (Mrs. Corbett-Winder) who survives.

Mrs. Garnett-Botfield was a member of the Bishop's Castle sub-pension war committee until she resigned last year owing to ill-health. She took a great interest in the British and Foreign Bible Society, was a member of the Ladies' Kennel Association and a successful exhibitor of Chow-Chows. She was interested in religious and social welfare of the district as evidenced by the fact that she laid one of the principal stones of the Congregational Church in 1913, and converted "Ivy Cottage" into a reading room for the workmen at Colebatch.

During the war she was a generous supporter of many efforts on behalf of war charities.

A muffled peal was rung on the bells of the Parish Church on Thursday night. The funeral took place on Tuesday when deceased was laid to rest in the vault beside her husband.

The cortege was met at the Old Hall by tenantry, tradesmen, members of the Corporation and others. The officiating clergymen were the Rev. C. R. Garnett-Botfield of Moreton (brother-in-law) and the Rev. W. E. Glenn. A large congregation assembled in the church and included representatives of the local and county families. The hymns "Jesus lover of My Soul" and "Abide with Me" were sung by the choir and congregation. The committal portion was taken by the Rev. C. R. Garnett-Botfield. There were a large number of beautiful floral emblems.

When she died, Elizabeth Clulow Garnett-Botfield left personal effects valued at L6,195-0s-5d. Carrying out her will, probated on March 16, 1921, was entrusted to her three executors: John Robert Howard McLean [her brother], Thomas Penson Griffithes, and William Sydney Bence Bosanquet.

Her will basically left everything to her daughter, Alix Corbett-Winder.



When William Egerton Garnett-Botfield married Elizabeth Clulow
Howard-McLean the celebration overtook the entire countryside around
Shifnal.
This happy e vent, which united the two houses of Decker Hill and Aston
Hall, Shifnal, in the persons of the son and heir of the former, and the
only daughter of the latter, took place on Thursday February 24, 1881at
Sheriffhales Church in Shi fnal, Shropshire.
It would not be easy to overrate the esteem felt in Shifnal for both
families, and the union of the heir of the one to the beautiful and
accomplished young member of the other excited the greatest possible
intere st. This was manifested in the extraordinary number and value of
the marriag e presents which came from all classes, and in the number of
visitors to Sher iffhales to witness the ceremony.
The morning broke beautifully fine, the sun shining out as it had not
done lately. The streets were fully peopled and ga y with flags, banners,
and arches, bearing mottoes of goodwill. Aston Street , leading to the
hall, was perhaps most thickly occupied, though High Street and the
Market Place bore a large share.
The start was made from Aston Hall at 10 o'clock in nine carriages, with
positions and grey horses, making a sp lendid appearance, the bride, in
the last, escorted by her father, Mr. J. Ho ward McLean. Sheriffhales
Church, three miles distant, was soon reached, and here was such a
gathering of neighbours from all around, and such a crowd in side the
church, as was a sight of itself, to such as were fortunate enough t o
gain a place. The pathway to the church was laid with red cloth, and
lin ed with old and young people of both sexes eager to obtain a good
sight of th e bridal party on its alighting at its destination, and again
when the ceremo ny was concluded.
The excitement of expectancy was very evident amongst those inside the
church as the wedding party entered, and, as it got into full view , that
feeling of course gave way to those pleasant sensations of interest a nd
gratified curiosity which are surely inevitable on such a happy occasion
as this, in the feminine constitution especially. The bride was
naturally t he first object of interest, and then her four fair
attendants, and (shall it be said?) perchance their dresses. Miss
Garnett-Botfield, Miss A. Garnett-B otfield (sisters of the bridegroom),
Miss Howard and Miss E. Howard, of Bou ghton Hall, Cheshire (cousins of
the bride) were the bridesmaids, and Mr. A. G. Botfield [Alfred
Garnett-Botfield]---the bridegroom's brother as "best man ."
The dress of the bride was of rich brocade satin, trimmed with Brussels
lace with pearls and orange blossoms, orange floral wreath, and Brussels
lac e veil. She also wore a diamond locket, the gift of her father; a
pearl lock et, the gift of the bridegroom; and a pearl suite, the gift of
her mother.
The bridesmaids' dresses were of pale blue plush and brocade, with plush
hat s, and pendants, the gift of the bridegroom. The ceremony was
performed by t he Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield (father of the bridegroom),
assisted by the Re v. C. R. Bradburne (the vicar of Sheriffhales). The
register was signed, "W. E. Garnett-Botfield", "E.C. Howard McLean",
"Helen E. Howard McLean", "Rob ert Howard", "T. N. F. Bardwell", and
"John Howard McLean".
The return journ ey was speedily commenced after the ceremony, amidst the
ringing of bells, an d connon-firing reports, and at Aston Hall more than
50 guests partook of the magnificent dejeuner provided. The ladies and
gentlemen invited including M r. and Mrs Howard McLean, Rev. W. B. and
Mrs. Garnett-Botfield, Captain and Mrs. Garnett, Lady Macdonald
Lockhart, Miss and Sir S. Macdonald Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. E. Dutton,
Miss Dutton, Mrs Latham Bailey, Miss Bailey, Mr. J . L. Bailey, Mr Lt. C.
Bailey, Mr and Mrs. Bardwell, Mr. Hector McLean, Mr. and Mrs J. Dutton,
Mr. and Mrs.Fitzgerald, Mi 
Howard-Mclean, Elizabeth Clulow (I270014)
 
37


William Bishton GARNETT, was born on June 27, 1816, the first son of Reverend William GARNETT and Elizabeth Sophia BISHTON. His brother Alfred Ingilby GARNETT was born 6 years later.

He was educated at Shrewsbury School and later took an M.A. at Brasenose College, Oxford. He entered the ministry, serving as Curate of Findon near Worthing (county Sussex) and in 1853 was preacher at Bunbury Church, Tarporley.

It was largely as a result of his efforts that the Bunbury Grammar School was completely transformed and a full time certified teacher (William Bailey) was hired. Garnett and Bailey together originated a novel scheme by which the children of families in any sphere of life could receive an excellent education at the school by paying tuition fees based according to the family's means.

On November 2, 1848 he married Sarah DUTTON, daughter of William DUTTON of Halewood House, Lancashire. Their first son, William Egerton Garnett was born August 16, 1849. Another son came along the following year, Alfred Stanton Garnett, born September 25, 1850. In 1853, daughters Grace Catharine and Lucy Sophia arrived. These first four children were born at Findon, Sussex while Reverend William Bishton Garnett was a Curate there.

The following year, the family moved to Bunbury to take up new parish duties and Walter Dutton was added to the rapidly growing Garnett brood.

The last two of their children, Annie Augusta and Charles Ramsay Garnett rounded out the family in 1857 and 1858 respectively.

When the 1861 Census was taken (April 15, 1861), the family of the Reverend William Bishton Garnett (age 44 and preacher at Bunbury Parish Church) was living at Bunbury Heath. Besides Rev. Garnett, his wife Sarah (age 37) and their seven children, the house was also occupied by his widowed 62-year old mother (Elizabeth Sophia Bishton Garnett), and his unmarried sister-in-law Anne Dutton (age 35).

There were also four house servants living with the family: Anne Moulton (age 59, housekeeper), Sarah Moulton (age 54, housemaid), May Rolf (age 26, nurse), and Effie Lydraid (age 17, housemaid). The Garnett family appear to have lived a comfortable and well-attended life for a humble preacher.

In 1863, the life and fortunes of the Garnetts took a remarkable turn for the better.

As it happened, William Bishton Garnett's cousin, Beriah Botfield (son of Beriah Botfield "the elder", and the nephew of Lucy BISHTON's sister) died without off-spring or heirs in that year.

Beriah Botfield was a Conservative Member of Parliament for the riding of Norton (from 1840-1847; 1857-1863), and had married Isabella LEIGHTON on October 21, 1858 at Alderbury.

Under a clause in the last Will and Testament of Beriah's uncle, William Botfield, if there were no heirs upon the death of his nephew, then the Botfield estate, property and family name was to pass to the Reverend William Bishton Garnett.

When Beriah Botfield died, his wife Isabella Leighton Botfield was asked if she was pregnant with an heir. She replied in the negative and "there was great jubilation" among the Garnetts.

The Botfield estate yielded an income of about 8,000-pounds a year (after some 20,000-pounds had been insured in trust for the younger children).

By Royal license dated October 30, 1863, William Bishton Garnett was also granted the right to take the surname BOTFIELD in addition to and after that of GARNETT and to use the arms of Botfield quarterly with those of Garnett. From that point onward, this branch of the Garnett family bore the name of GARNETT-BOTFIELD.

The income from the BOTFIELD inheritance and estate supported the family of Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield in a high style of life. The 1871 census shows the following hired help living at the Garnett-Botfield Decker Hill estate: a governess, housekeeper, cook, laundry maid, house maid, ladies maid, under housemaid, kitchen maid, butler, footman, coachman, two gardeners, groom, garden laborer, and a game keeper.

William Bishton Garnett-Botfield was appointed Justice of the Peace for Decker Hill, Shifnal and Chairman County Magistrates for Shifnal Petty Sessional Division in 1891. He was a strong supporter of local charities and a wall monument in his honour can still be seen at the parish church in Shifnal. In politics he was an extreme radical [a devoted liberal] who advocated free education and the establishment of a federation of British colonies---an idea that perhaps foreshadowed the formation of the British Commonwealth many years later.

In his account of the Garnett Family History, George Garnett in 1910 recounts his boyhood recollection of the Reverend William Bishton Garnett as "an extreme radical but otherwise a good fellow, told a story well and gave me [George Garnett], when I was a boy, a 5-pound and 10-pound note. He was a good fly fisherman for trout and a popular man."

Of the children of William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD and Sarah DUTTON (who died February 18, 1867), the following information is currently known:

William Egerton GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born August 16, 1849, was educated at Oxford. He married Elizabeth Clulow HOWARD-McLEAN on February 24, 1881 and had two sons and one daughter. He died April 3, 1906.]

Alfred Stanton GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born September 25, 1850, was educated at Rugby and Brasenose College, Oxford (B.A.) He died unmarried on January 15, 1891.

Grace Catherine, who was born in 1853, and died on January 4, 1930. She continued to live unmarried at Shifnal where she became closely identified with all local good works. She was secretary of the Shifnal District Nursing Fund, head of the Mother's Meeting and an associate of the Mothers' Union. Grace Catherine was also president of the lcoal Woman's Institute and honorary treasurer of the Woman's Conservative Association.

Lucy Sophia, born also in 1853, married Thomas Newman Frederick BARDWELL of Bolton Hall, Yorkshire in April, 1880. They had no children. She died November 20, 1899.

Walter Dutton GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born June 16, 1854 was educated at Rugby and the Royal Military Academy (R.M.A.), Woolwich. He became a Major in the Royal Artillery, and married Susan Katherine Houldsworth McConnel of Hale Carr, Bowdon, Cheshire on August 2, 1894. Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield died December 6, 1903 leaving one daughter: Ruth GARNETT-BOTFIELD who married her cousin Major-General Douglas Fitzgerald McConnel of Heath Ends, Basingstoke on April 29, 1920.

Annie Augusta, born in 1857, married Thomas ALDERSEY on April 19, 1887. They had three children: Thomas Francis Garnett ALDERSEY, Walter Massie ALDERSEY, and Gladys Valentine ALDERSEY (Sister Mary Veronica). Annie Augusta died March 8, 1931.

Charles Ramsay GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born May 7, 1857, was educated at Harrow and Magdalen College, Oxford (M.A. 1884). He went into the ministry and became Vicar of Moreton, Oswestry. In 1886, he married Ida Mary ALDERSEY, the sister of his brother-in-law, Thomas ALDERSEY. He died September 19, 1932 and was succeeded by his son Jack Massie GARNETT-BOTFIELD (1890-1938).

William Bishton Garnett-Botfield died on Sunday, January 11, 1903 at the age of 86 years. He was well-known and highly regarded throughout Shropshire and his original home county of Cheshire, and a long obituary for him appeared in the "Wellington Journal" on the Saturday following his death.

After an illness extending over some period, the
Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield of Decker Hill, Shifnal, passed away on Sunday, at the ripe age of 86 years. The
rev. gentleman, who was well known throughout Shropshire and Cheshire, had resided at Decker Hill for a great number of years.

He was a justice of the peace, and had for a considerable period taken an active part in the magisterial proceedings at the local and county sessions. As a landlord he was thoughtful and kind, and was a friend true and loyal. Always sympathetic to the cry of the distressed and needy, he identified himself with many works of a philanthropic nature, and the poor of Shifnal and the neighbourhood especially constantly benefited by his deeds of generosity.

In politics he was a Liberal, and for some years had been the president of the Newport Divisional Liberal Association.

Born in 1816, the deceased was the eldest son of the late Rev. W. Garnett of Haughton Hall, Chester, rector of Church Tilston, his mother being the only daughter and heiress of Mr. J. Bishton of Kilsall House, Shropshire.

He was authorised by Royal license in 1863, in compliance with a proviso contained in the will of Mr. W. Botfield of Decker Hill, to take the surname of Botfield in addition to Garnett, and to bear the arms of Botfield quartered with those of Garnett. He was educated first at Shrewsbury School and afterwards at Brasenose College, Oxford, where he graduated in 1840. In 1853 he was appointed "The Preacher" of Bunbury, Cheshire, which appointment he held until 1863.

The Rev. gentleman married in 1848 as his first wife the daughter of Mr. W. Dutton of Halewood House, Lancashire; she died in 1867 leaving four sons and three daughters. The eldest son, Mr. W. E. Garnett-Botfield of The Hut, Bishop's Castle, succeeds his father. Some years after his first wife's death, the deceased gentleman married a daughter of Mr. A. Wright of Dover, and this lady predeceased her husband only in June last.

The funeral of the deceased gentleman took place at Shifnal Parish Church on Wednesday. The cortege left Decker Hill in the early afternoon, and was met near the entrance to the town by a large concourse of local tradesmen and the general public, who followed the procession to the church.

All business houses were closed, and houses along the route had their windows closely shuttered. The procession was headed by a detachment of police, which was followed by the hearse, containing the coffin, and the bearers.

The principal mourners and private carriages came next, and after them a number of the neighbouring gentry and magistrates. Following these were representatives of the Shifnal Rural Council and Shifnal Parish Council, the local fire brigade (in uniform), tradesmen, members of the Foresters' and Oddfellows' Friendly Societies, and the general public.

On arrival at the church gates the cortege was met by the Re. W.E. Malaher (vicar) and the Rev. J. T. Peters (curate), both of whom took part in the service.
The hymn, "The King of Love my Shepherd is", was sung in the church, and before leaving the edifice the organist (Mr. R. Owen) played the "Dead March".

The church was crowded, but special arrangements had been made for the seating of the congregation by the churchwardens, assisted by Messrs. W. J. Fenn,
H. L. Lawrence, and J. Morton (sidesmen).

At the graveside the surpliced choir sang "Glory to Three".

The mourners were: Mr. and Mrs W. E. Garnett (son and daughter-in-law), Major and Mrs Garnett-Botfield (son and daughter-in-law), Rev. C. Botfield (son), Mr. Aldersey (son in law), Mr. Craven Garnett, Mr. J. Dutton, Mr. H. Stanton, Mr. C. H. Smith, Mr. A. W. Gilmour, Mr. J. R. Howard McLean,
Mr. N. Howard McLean, and Mr. C. W. Harvey (agent),

[A long list of mourners and also those who sent floral tributes are printed here].

William Bishton Garnett-Botfield's will was probated on April 3, 1903.
The net value of his estate amounted to L41,239-0s-5d.

To oversee his wishes, he appointed three executors and trustees: his two sons William Egerton Garnett- Botfield and Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield, and his son-in-law Thomas Newman Frederick Bardwell.

The first part of the will outlines the provisions of a trust fund which he established in 1870 for the benefit of his wife and children. The funding of this trust fund was based on an Indenture put upon his manor and estates at Haughton and elsewhere in Cheshire as well as on moneys payable from certain life insurance policies.

One-sixth shares of this trust fund had already been paid to three of his children: Lucy Sophia Bardwell, Annie Augusta Aldersey and Charles Ramsey Garnett-Botfield at the time of their respective marriages.

Under terms of the will, the trustees were to administer the distribution of two additional one-sixth shares of the fund to two other children, namely---Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield and Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield. The last remaining one-sixth share [that share belonging to Alfred Stanton Garnett- Botfield who had died intestate and unmarried in 1891] was to be split among all of his surviving children.

At his death, Alfred Stanton Garnett-Botfield had also left a messuage and land near Cwm Maur Dingle, other real estate properties, and L1,500 in ready money. The administration papers had turned these properties and cash over to William Bishton Garnett-Botfield as rightful next of kin.

In the terms of his own will, William Bishton G-B bequeathed the property at Cwn Maur Dingle to William Egerton Garnett-Botfield on condition that W.E. G-B pay the sum of L400 to Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield. If after 12-months this sum wasn't paid, then the property was to revert directly to Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield completely. The trustees are instructed to divide the L1,500 in cash among all the other children [except W. Egerton G-B].

All the balance of Alfred Stanton's possessions held by Wm. Bishton G-B is bequeathed to Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield.

Further bequests are made as follows:

I bequeath to the said William Egerton Garnett-Botfield my presentation plate from Bunbury, all the family portraits in oil which I brought with me to Decker Hill and my oak chair made of wood from Bunbury and presented to me by my old parishioners there.

I bequeath to the said Walter Dutton Garnett-Botfield all my furniture and other effects at the Camp Caradoc's Well near Bishop's Castle.

I bequeath the household furniture, linen and other household effects now contained in my residence at Decker Hill and placed there by me since my succession to the estate and also my presentation plate from Findon and all other of my silver plate to my daughter Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield absolutely.

And all other of my chattels and effects at Decker Hill and placed there as aforesaid among such of my children (other than the said William Egerton Garnett-Botfield) as shall be living at my decease in equal shares as they shall mutually agree to divide the same.

I give and bequeath the following pecuniary legacies (all free of duty) namely To each of the children of my late brother Alfred Ingilby Garnett, two hundred pounds.

To Eliza Wright Rosa Campbell and Alice Gilmour (my sisters-in-law) twenty pounds each.

To the said Thomas Newman Frederick Bardwell and James Roger Dutton twenty pounds each.

To my said son William Egerton Garnett-Botfield that he may not think I have forgotten him though he is amply provided for, fifty pounds for a ring or watch.

To my Estate Bailiff John Leech1, twenty pounds.

To my indoor servant William Higgins, thirty pounds.

To my Coachman James Higgins, ten pounds.

To my Gardener John Barnett and my servant Martha Vaughan, twenty pounds each.

And to my said daughter Grace Catherine Garnett-Botfield fifty pounds to be distributed by her at her absolute discretion among my servants or any of them in such shares and manner as she shall think best. And I declare that in the case of a legacy given to a servant the same shall only take effect provided the legatee is in my service at the time of my decease.

And lastly I devise and bequeath all the residue of my personal estate and effects whatsoever and wheresoever (including all Policies of Assurance on my life) and all my real estate of every tenure and wheresoever situate not hereby otherwise disposed of (including as well real as personal estate over which I may have any general power of appointment or disposition by Will) unto and to the use of my trustees their heirs executors administrators and assigns respectively upon trust to sell call in collect and convert into money the same and to pay there out my funeral and testamentary expenses and debts and the pecuniary legacies bequeathed by this my Will or any codicil hereto and the duties on the said pecuniary legacies and subject thereto in trust for all or any my children or child living at my death [except William Egerton Garnett-Botfield] and the children of child then living of any then deceased child of mine who being male attain the age of twenty-one years, or being female attain that age or marry; if more than one as tenants in common, equal shares but so that the children of any deceased child of mind shall take equally between them as tenants in common only the share which their parent would have taken had he or she survived me and attained a vested interest.

In witness whereof I have to this my Will contained in this and the preceding three sheets of paper set my hand this twenty sixth day of September one thousand nine hundred and two.

The personal library and papers of William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD are today preserved for historical and genealogical study in the Shropshire Public Record Office at Shrewsbury, Shropshire.




GARNETT, William Bishton
[aka GARNETT-BOTFIELD]
[1816-1903]
William Bishton GARNETT, was born on June 27, 1816, the first son of
Reverend William GARNETT and Elizabeth Sophia BISHTON. His brother
Alfred Ingilby GARNETT was born 6 years later.
He was educated at Shrewsbury School and later took an M. A. at Brasenose
College, Oxford. He entered the ministry, serving as Curate of Fin don
near Worthing (county Sussex) and in 1853 was preacher at Bunbury Church,
Tarporley.
It was largely as a result of his efforts that the Bunbury Gramm ar School
[The Aldersey School] was completely transformed and a full time
certified teacher (William Bailey) was hired. Garnett and Bailey together
ori ginated a novel scheme by which the children of families in any sphere
of lif e could receive an excellent education at the school by paying
tuition fees b ased according to the family's means.
On November 2, 1848 he married Sarah DUT TON, daughter of William DUTTON
of Halewood House, Lancashire. Their first s on, William Egerton Garnett
was born August 16, 1849. Another son came along the following year,
Alfred Stanton Garnett, born September 25, 1850. In 18 53, daughters
Grace Catharine and Lucy Sophia arrived. These first four chil dren were
born at Findon, Sussex while Reverend William Bishton Garnett was a
Curate there.
The following year, the family moved to Bunbury to take up ne w parish
duties and Walter Dutton was added to the rapidly growing Garnett br ood.
The last two of their children, Annie Augusta and Charles Ramsay Garnett
rounded out the family in 1857 and 1858 respectively.
When the 1861 Census w as taken (April 15, 1861), the family of the
Reverend William Bishton Garnett (age 44 and preacher at Bunbury Parish
Church) was living at Bunbury Heath. Besides Rev. Garnett, his wife
Sarah (age 37) and their seven children, the house was also occupied by
his widowed 62-year old mother (Elizabeth Sophia Bishton Garnett), and
his unmarried sister-in-law Anne Dutton (age 35).
Ther e were also four house servants living with the family: Anne Moulton
(age 59 , housekeeper), Sarah Moulton (age 54, housemaid), May Rolf (age
26, nurse), and Effie Lydraid (age 17, housemaid). The Garnett family
appear to have liv ed a comfortable and well-attended life for a humble
preacher.
In 1863, the life and fortunes of the Garnetts took a remarkable turn
for the better.
As it happened, William Bishton Garnett's cousin, Beriah Botfield (son
of Beri ah Botfield "the elder", and the nephew of Lucy BISHTON's sister)
died witho ut off-spring or heirs in that year.
Beriah Botfield was a Conservative Mem ber of Parliament for the riding
of Norton (from 1840-1847; 1857-1863), and h ad married Isabella LEIGHTON
on October 21, 1858 at Alderbury.
Under a cla use in the last Will and Testament of Beriah's uncle, William
Botfield, if t here were no heirs upon the death of his nephew, then the
Botfield estate, pr operty and family name was to pass to the Reverend
William Bishton Garnett.
When Beriah Botfield died, his wife Isabella Leighton Botfield was asked
if s he was pregnant with an heir. She replied in the negative and "there
was gre at jubilation" among the Garnetts.
The Botfield estate yielded an income of ab out 8,000-pounds a year (after
some 20,000-pounds had been insured in trust f or the younger children).
By Royal license dated October 30, 1863, William Bi shton Garnett was
also granted the right to take the surname BOTFIELD in addi tion to and
after that of GARNETT and to use the arms of Botfield quarterly w ith
those of Garnett. From that point onward, this branch of the Garnett
family bore the name of GARNETT-BOTFIELD.
The income from the BOTFIELD inheri tance and estate supported the family
of Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfiel d in a high style of life. The
1871 census shows the following hired help li ving at the Garnett-Botfield
Decker Hill estate 
Garnett-Botfield, William Bishton (I270116)
 
38


William Egerton GARNETT- BOTFIELD was the first born son and heir of the Reverend William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD and his wife Sarah DUTTON.

There were six other children in the family besides William Egerton when his father the Reverend William Bishton Garnett inherited the fortune, estate and name of the BOTFIELD family in 1863. Alfred Stanton (September 25, 1850); Walter Dutton (b. June 1, 1854); Charles Ramsay (b. May 7, 1858); Lucy Sophia and Grace Catherine (b. 1853); and Annie Augusta (b. 1857).

William Egerton Garnett-Botfield was educated at Christ Church, Oxford.

He married Elizabeth Clulow HOWARD-McLEAN, the only child and heir of John Howard McLean of Aston Hall, Salop, on February 24, 1881. Together they had three children---two sons and a daughter:

William McLean GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born December 29, 1881, who married twice but left no children or heirs.

Alfred Clulow FitzGerald GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born June 16, 1892 was killed during World War I at the age of 23, and was unmarried.

Helen Stella Alexandrina GARNETT-BOTFIELD married Frederick Feilden CORBETT-WINDER on January 7, 1919 and had one daughter Riba Clulow CORBETT-WINDER.

In the 1906 edition of Bye-Gones, we find the following obituary notice for William Egerton Garnett-Botfield:

It is with great regret that we record the death, which took place at his seat, The Hut, Bishop's Castle, last evening week, of Mr. William Egerton Garnett-Botfield, one of the best known and most esteemed of Shropshire gentlemen.

Mr. Garnett-Botfield was the eldest son of the late Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield, who assumed the additional surname of Botfield by Royal licence in 1863 on succeeding to the estates of his uncle, Mr. William Botfield, of Decker Hill, Shifnal.

Born at Findon, Sussex, on August 16, 1849, he was educated privately and at Christ Church, Oxford. he married in 1881, Elizabeth Clulow, only daughter of the late Mr. John Howard McLean, of Aston, Hall, Shifnal, who, with three children---Mr. W. McLean Garnett- Botfield, Miss Alexandria Garnett-Botfield, and Mr. Clulow Garnett-Botfield---survives him.

He was placed on the Commission of the Peace for the county of Salop in 1872, and later became a magistrate for Montgomeryshire also. On the formation of the County Council of Salop he became a councillor for the Bishop's Castle Division, and remained their representative until 1904, when he was raised to the aldermanic bench.

He had a long connection with the borough of Bishop's Castle. He was elected councillor in 1885 at the first election under Sir Charles Dilke's Act; alderman in 1889, and six times---1888-9, 1896-97, 1898-99, and 1901-93,
he served as Mayor.

He was president of the local auxiliary of the Bible Society, the welfare of which he had very much at heart; and he turned a literary bent to good account for the benefit of local societies by reading many informing papers on subjects of general interest. He was president of the Mutal Improvement Society, and of the football Club, and everything that tended to the development of the young life of the neighbourhood received his generous support.

He was a member of the Board of Guardians, and one of the managers of the Council Schools, after having served for many years on the School Board. He took a great interest in the Agricultural Society, and served as its president, and the Society owes much of its success to his strenuous support.

As a landlord, he was one of the most considerate, and was held in much regard and esteem by all his tenants. He was a Fellow of the Geological Society, and had been president of the Caradoc and Severn Valley Field Club since 1893.

His services in this connection, as in all others with which he was identified, were marked by that tact and sweetness which endeared him to all whose privilege it was to know him.

He had travelled a good deal, especially in countries round the Eastern Mediterranean, Switzerland and Norway.

Mr. Garnett-Botfield was fond of shooting, an ardent angler, and some years ago hunted a pack of beagles. Scientifically, his strong point was geology. He was a keen lover of nature in all her aspects; and found supreme delight in observing the common things of his own pretty country side.

[From Bye-Gones, April 11, 1906, pages 223-224---a copy of which can be found in the archives of the Shropshire Records and Research Unit at Shrewsbury, Shropshire]


An obituary for William Egerton Garnett-Botfield also appeared in the April 7, 1906 edition of the Market Drayton Advertiser. It provides additional details about his life and further support for his benevolent character:

We regret to have to announce the decease of Mr. William Egerton Garnett-Botfield, J.P. of Decker Hill, Shifnal, and of The Hut, Bishop's Castle, who died after a short illness, at his last-named residence, on Tuesday last, in his fifty-eighth year.

The deceased gentleman took a keen interest in public matters: he was six times elected Mayor of Bishop's Castle, and was a member of the Salop County Council. He was a Liberal in politics. Every philanthropic movement had his sympathy and support.


He was married a little over twenty-five years ago to Miss Howard McLean, daughter of Mrs Howard-McLean of Aston Hall, Shifnall; and, on the recent occasion of the silver wedding, the people of Shifnal presented to them a massive silver rose bowl and an address, as a token of the affection and esteem in which they and their respective families were held.

The deceased gentleman, who was born on August 16th, 1849, was the eldest son of the Rev. William Bishton Garnett-Botfield, M.A., of Decker Hill; his mother was Sarah, wife [daughter] of William Dutton, Esq. Halewood House, Lancashire.

The Rev. W. B. Garnett-Botfield was the eldest son of the Rev. William Garnett of Haughton Hall, Cheshire, and Rector of Church Tilston, who was married to [Elizabeth] Sophia, only daughter and heiress of John Bishton, of Kilsall House, near Shifnall.

This Rev. William [Bishton] Garnett, grandfather [father] of Mr. W. E. Garnett-Botfield was authorised by royal license, dated October 30th 1863, in compliance with the last will and testament of Mr. William Botfield, of Decker Hill, to take and henceforth use the name of Botfield, in addition to and after that of Garnett, and to bear the arms of Botfield quarterly with that of Garnett.

For many generations the Garnett family was settled in the parishes of Bunbury, Acton, and Nantwich, Cheshire.

Mrs. Garnett-Botfield survives the deceased gentleman, and he is succeeded in the ownership of the estates by his son, Mr. McLean Garnett-Botfield, who came of age about twelve months ago.

The funeral took place yesterday (Friday) at Bishop's Castle, at four o'clock.

[From the Market Drayton Advertiser, April 7, 1906]


GARNETT-BOTFIELD
[1849-1906]
William Egerton GARNETT- BOTFIELD was the first born son and heir of the
Reverend William Bishton GARNETT-BOTFIELD and his wife Sarah DUTTON.
There were six other children in the family besides William Egerton when
his father the Reverend William Bishton Garnett inherited the f ortune,
estate and name of the BOTFIELD family in 1863. Alfred Stanton
(Se ptember 25, 1850); Walter Dutton (b. June 1, 1854); Charles Ramsay
(b. May 7 , 1858); Lucy Sophia and Grace Catherine (b. 1853); and Annie
Augusta (b. 185 7).
William Egerton Garnett-Botfield was educated at Christ Church, Oxford.
H e married Elizabeth Clulow HOWARD-McLEAN, the only child and heir of
John How ard McLean of Aston Hall, Salop, on February 24, 1881. Together
they had th ree children---two sons and a daughter:
William McLean GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born December 29, 1881, who married
twice but left no children or heirs.
Alfred Clulow FitzGerald GARNETT-BOTFIELD, born June 16, 1892 was killed
during Wor ld War I at the age of 23, and was unmarried.
Helen Stella Alexandrina GARNETT -BOTFIELD married Frederick Feilden
CORBETT-WINDER on January 7, 1919 and had one daughter Riba Clulow
CORBETT-WINDER.
In the 1906 edition of Bye-Gones, we find the following obituary notice
for William Egerton Garnett-Botfield:
It is with great regret that we record the death, which took place at his
s eat, The Hut, Bishop's Castle, last evening week, of Mr. William
Egerton Gar nett-Botfield, one of the best known and most esteemed of
Shropshire gentleme n.
Mr. Garnett-Botfield was the eldest son of the late Rev.William Bishton
G arnett-Botfield, who assumed the additional surname of Botfield by Royal
lice nce in 1863 on succeeding to the estates of his uncle, Mr. William
Botfield, of Decker Hill, Shifnal.
Born at Findon, Sussex, on August 16, 1849, he was educated privately
and at Christ Church, Oxford. he married in 1881, Elizab eth Clulow, only
daughter of the late Mr. John Howard McLean, of Aston, Hall, Shifnal,
who, with three children---Mr. W. McLean Garnett-Botfield, Miss
A lexandria Garnett-Botfield, and Mr. Clulow Garnett-Botfield---survives
him.
He was placed on the Commission of the Peace for the county of Salop in
187 2, and later became a magistrate for Montgomeryshire also. On the
formation of the County Council of Salop he became a councillor for the
Bishop's Castle Division, and remained their representative until 1904,
when he was raised t o the aldermanic bench.
He had a long connection with the borough of Bishop' s Castle. He was
elected councillor in 1885 at the first election under Sir Charles
Dilke's Act; alderman in 1889, and six times---1888-9, 1896-97, 1898 -99,
and 1901-93, he served as Mayor.
He was president of the local auxili ary of the Bible Society, the welfare
of which he had very much at heart; an d he turned a literary bent to
good account for the benefit of local socie ties by reading many
informing papers on subjects of general interest. He wa s president of
the Mutal Improvement Society, and of the football Club, and e verything
that tended to the development of the young life of the neighbourho od
received his generous support.
He was a member of the Board of Guardian s, and one of the managers of the
Council Schools, after having served for ma ny years on the School Board.
He took a great interest in the Agricultur al Society, and served as
its president, and the Society owes much of its suc cess to his
strenuous support.
As a landlord, he was one of the most con siderate, and was held in much
regard and esteem by all his tenants. He was a Fellow of the Geological
Society, and had been president of the Caradoc and Severn Valley Field
Club since 1893.
His services in this connection, as in all others with which he was
identified, were marked by that tact and swee tness which endeared him to
all whose privilege 
Garnett-Botfield, William Egerton (I270010)
 
39


William McLean GARNETT- BOTFIELD, was the eldest son of William Egerton GARNETT-BOTFIELD] and Elizabeth Clulow HOWARD-McLEAN the only daughter of John Howard-McLean of Aston Hall, Salop.
William McLean Garnett-Botfield was born December 29, 1881---eleven years before his only brother, Alfred Clulow FitzGerald Garnett-Botfield. In addition to this one brother, William McLean also had a sister named Helen Stella Alexandrina who married Fredrick Feilden CORBETT- WINDER of Vaynor Park, Berriew on January 7, 1919.

William McLean was educated at Cheam School, Eton and Trinity College Cambridge where he received an M.A.

When his father died prematurely in 1906, young Billie [as he was popularly known] inherited the family estates at Decker Hill and Bishop's Castle. But he had little interest and talent for managing the family properties, and entrusted the day-to-day operation of the estates to his agent and property manager [a man named Harvey] and his solicitor, Salt & Sons.

Billie first went to Canada in about 1912, and purchased a farm near Edmonton, Alberta which he named Decker Hill Farm. He intended to build a farm house there and hired an architect to draw up blueprints. But he had to return to England shortly afterwards, partly to obtain money and attend to the demands of the Shropshire properties.

Billie evidentally planned to return to Canada, but this was hindered first by his falling gravely ill with typhoid fever, then by the outbreak of war in Europe. Billie, as well as his younger brother Clulow enlisted as officers in the British army. Clulow was killed fighting in France in May of 1915, but Billie managed to avoid front line duty and so survived the war.

Perhaps relations between Billie and his mother and sister were never on good terms, but they took a definite turn for the worse when Billie inherited all the Botfield properties under his father's will.

The squabbling soon erupted.

Billie's mother received none of the Botfield properties, although she was supposed to retain use of "The Hut" at Bishop's Castle as a residence for the duration of her life. The Hut, despite its humble name, was a hug two story residence consisting of 7 bedrooms on the second floor; a drawing room, library, dining room and smoking room on the first floor, two kitchens, scullery, larder and boiler house in the rear. The house itself was on a 10 acre plot of land, with an adjoining 11 acres on one side. There was a three-stall stable, harness room and double coach house also on the property. A separate parcel of land, comprising the 182 acre Star Farm was located adjacent to The Hut and was also owned by the Garnett-Botfields.

As the oldest maile heir, Billie was legally entitled to everything---lock, stock and barrel. But under the vague terms of his father's will, Billie was providing The Hut as well as an annual stipend to his mother. The records show that Billie was annually paying half of all the income from the Botfield estates to his mother, thus leaving an insufficient remainder for proper upkeep on the farms.

Billie was always strapped for cash in those days. Taxes were high on the properties. His mother was bleeding him dry.

The ill-will created by this feud over property and inheritance certianly did not died with the demise of Billie's mother in January, 1921. Mrs. Garnett-Botfield left everything she had power of appointing or disposing of to her daughter Alex, and nothing to Billie. "Very rough on him as he get neither stick nor sliver of anything belonging to his father or Decker Hill pictures, furniture or silver unless Alix wishes" says a letter from Harvey to Salt on January 20, 1921 after the reading of Mrs. Garnett-Botfield's will.

The wrangle then continued between Billie and his sister Alix. When the houses at Decker Hill and Bishop's Castle were put up for sale, Alix ordered most of the family furniture, pictures, household effects and moveable property trucked off to her own home at Vaynor Park. Through their respective lawyers, Billie and Alix fought vendictively with each other over every personal item in the houses that Billie wished to lay claim to. And to add insult to injury, Alix had bills for repairs on her motor car sent directly to Billie for payment as well as charging him for the wages of servants to pack the belongings for shipment to Vaynor Park.

Unwisely, Billie had great blocks of the Garnett-Botfield land holdings put up for sale at the same time...thereby lowering their market value. Tenants were offered first right to purchase the lands they occupied, and the remainder was auctioned off at a fraction of their real value. It seems Billie was in very desperate straights financially.

It can charitably be said that Billie did not have a good head for business, and he placed too much trust in his advisors, land agents and especially in his lawyer Mr. Salt [who seems to have greatly profited from Billie's inexperience and gullibility].

On June 22, 1912, he married his first wife, Elspeth Chisholm DICKSON, fourth daughter of David Dickson of Travant, Midlothian. She died May 12, 1937---there were no children by this marriage.

In the same year (August 19, 1937), he married his second wife, Vera Dorothy HETHERINGTON, elder daughter of Charles Hetherington of Kingston, Surrey.

They also had no children.

Billie [at age 79] died on May 4, 1961 at Surbiton Hospital, Surbiton, Surrey of Carcinomatosis [cancer of the rectum]. His home address at time of death was #1, Endsleigh Gardens, Surbiton and his occupation was listed as "of private means". The informant was G. W. Hetherington, his brother-in-law.

There is absolutely no trace of either a will or administration being probated for William McLean Garnett-Botfield---there is no registration of any such documents in the Annual Calendars of Probate from 1961 to 1995. Perhaps he died bankrupt, or had given away all of his possessions prior to his illness and death to avoid the ravages of British death duties and inheritance taxes.

When William McLean Garnett-Botfield finally succumbed to the ravages of caner in 1961, the Garnett-Botfield name, and the great wealth the family had once possessed was at an end. He was the last of the breed...the end of the line.



William McLean GARNETT- BOTFIELD, was the eldest son of William Egerton
GARN ETT-BOTFIELD] and Elizabeth Clulow HOWARD-McLEAN the only daughter of
John Ho ward-McLean of Aston Hall, Salop.
William McLean Garnett-Botfield was born Dec ember 29, 1881---eleven years
before his only brother, Alfred Clulow FitzGer ald Garnett-Botfield. In
addition to this one brother, William McLean also had a sister named
Helen Stella Alexandrina who married Fredrick Feilden CORB ETT-WINDER of
Vaynor Park, Berriew on January 7, 1919.
William McLean was ed ucated at Cheam School, Eton and Trinity College
Cambridge where he received an M.A.
When his father died prematurely in 1906, young Billie [as he was
p opularly known] inherited the family estates at Decker Hill and
Bishop's Cas tle. But he had little interest and talent for managing the
family propertie s, and entrusted the day-to-day operation of the estates
to his agent and pro perty manager [a man named Harvey] and his solicitor,
Salt & Sons.
Billie fi rst went to Canada in about 1912, and purchased a farm near
Edmonton, Albert a which he named Decker Hill Farm. He intended to build
a farm house there a nd hired an architect to draw up blueprints. But he
had to return to England shortly afterwards, partly to obtain money and
attend to the demands of the Shropshire properties.
Billie evidentally planned to return to Canada, but th is was hindered
first by his falling gravely ill with typhoid fever, then by the outbreak
of war in Europe. Billie, as well as his younger brother Clulow enlisted
as officers in the British army. Clulow was killed fighting in Fra nce in
May of 1915, but Billie managed to avoid front line duty and so survi ved
the war.
Perhaps relations between Billie and his mother and sister wer e never on
good terms, but they took a definite turn for the worse when Billi e
inherited all the Botfield properties under his father's will.
The squabbl ing soon erupted.
Billie's mother received none of the Botfield properties, al though she
was supposed to retain use of "The Hut" at Bishop's Castle as a re sidence
for the duration of her life. The Hut, despite its humble name, was a
hug two story residence consisting of 7 bedrooms on the second floor; a
d rawing room, library, dining room and smoking room on the first floor,
two ki tchens, scullery, larder and boiler house in the rear. The house
itself was on a 10 acre plot of land, with an adjoining 11 acres on one
side. There wa s a three-stall stable, harness room and double coach
house also on the prope rty. A separate parcel of land, comprising the
182 acre Star Farm was locate d adjacent to The Hut and was also owned by
the Garnett-Botfields.
As the ol dest male heir, Billie was legally entitled to
everything---lock, stock and b arrel. But under the vague terms of his
father's will, Billie was providin g The Hut as well as an annual stipend
to his mother. The records show that Billie was annually paying half of
all the income from the Botfield estates t o his mother, thus leaving an
insufficient remainder for proper upkeep on the farms.
Billie was always strapped for cash in those days. Taxes were high on
the properties. Paying his mother stipend was bleeding him dry
financiall y.
The ill-will created by this feud over property and inheritance certianly
did not died with the demise of Billie's mother in January, 1921. Mrs.
Garn ett-Botfield left everything she had power of appointing or disposing
of to h er daughter Alex, and nothing to Billie. "Very rough on him as
he get neith er stick nor sliver of anything belonging to his father or
Decker Hill pictur es, furniture or silver unless Alix wishes" says a
letter from Harvey to Sal t on January 20, 1921 after the reading of Mrs.
Garnett-Botfield's will.
The wrangle then continued between Billie and his sister Alix. When the
houses at Decker Hill and Bishop's Castle were put up fo 
Garnett-Botfield, William McLean (I270015)
 
40

44. WILLIAM GREGG (THE43 QUAKER) (WILLIAM42 GREGG, JOHN41, JOHN CLAN40 GREGOR, JOHN39 MCGREGOR, PATRICK38, BLACK OR DUBH JOHN CLAN37 GREGOR, PATRICK CLAN36, MALCOLM CLAN35, JOHN DUBH CLAN34, JOHN CHAM CLAN33, MALCOLM CLAN32, JOHN DE GLENURCHY CLAN31, GREGOR30 MCGREGOR, WILLIAM GREGOR29 LORD, SIR MALCOLM28 MCGREGOR, LAIRD JOHN27, MALCOLM CLAN26 GREGOR, GREGOR25 GARBH, JOHN OF THE24 STANDARD, DOUNGEAL23, GREGOR OF THE22 STANDARD, PRINCELY JOHN THE21 LUCKY, MALCOLM20, DUNCAN THE19 LITTLE, DUNCAN FROM18 STWLEE, GILLEFEALAN OR WILLIAM OF THE17 AMBUSH, HUGH OF16 URCHY, KENNETH OF THE POINTED SPEAR15 MCALPINE, GREGORIUS OR GREGORY14 ALPINE, ALPIN13, EOCHY-ANNUINE (EUGENIUS III) OR12 ACHAIUS, ED-FIN (ETFINIUS OF HUGH THE11 WHITE), EOCHY II10 RINNVAL, DOMAGART9 (DONGARDUS), DONALD8 I, EOCHY II (EUGENIUS7 I), AIDAN6, GORRAN5 (GORANUS), DOMANGART (4 DONGARDUS), FERGUS THE GREAT (FERGUS MOR3 EARCA), KING OF DALREIDA (COUNTY ULSTER)2 ERC, EOCHY MUNREVAR1 (EUGENIUS)) was born Abt. 1642, and died July 01, 1687 in Newcastle County , Delaware. He married ANN WILKERSON.

Children of WILLIAM QUAKER) and ANN WILKERSON are:
i. JOHN44 GREGG, b. 1668.
ii. ANN GREGG, b. 1670.
iii. GEORGE GREGG, b. 1674.
iv. RICHARD GREGG, b. 1676.


Generation No. 44

45. JOHN44 GREGG (JOHN43, WILLIAM42, JOHN41, JOHN CLAN40 GREGOR, JOHN39 MCGREGOR, PATRICK38, BLACK OR DUBH JOHN CLAN37 GREGOR, PATRICK CLAN36, MALCOLM CLAN35, JOHN DUBH CLAN34, JOHN CHAM CLAN33, MALCOLM CLAN32, JOHN DE GLENURCHY CLAN31, GREGOR30 MCGREGOR, WILLIAM GREGOR29 LORD, SIR MALCOLM28 MCGREGOR, LAIRD JOHN27, MALCOLM CLAN26 GREGOR, GREGOR25 GARBH, JOHN OF THE24 STANDARD, DOUNGEAL23, GREGOR OF THE22 STANDARD, PRINCELY JOHN THE21 LUCKY, MALCOLM20, DUNCAN THE19 LITTLE, DUNCAN FROM18 STWLEE, GILLEFEALAN OR WILLIAM OF THE17 AMBUSH, HUGH OF16 URCHY, KENNETH OF THE POINTED SPEAR15 MCALPINE, GREGORIUS OR GREGORY14 ALPINE, ALPIN13, EOCHY-ANNUINE (EUGENIUS III) OR12 ACHAIUS, ED-FIN (ETFINIUS OF HUGH THE11 WHITE), EOCHY II10 RINNVAL, DOMAGART9 (DONGARDUS), DONALD8 I, EOCHY II (EUGENIUS7 I), AIDAN6, GORRAN5 (GORANUS), DOMANGART (4 DONGARDUS), FERGUS THE GREAT (FERGUS MOR3 EARCA), KING OF DALREIDA (COUNTY ULSTER)2 ERC, EOCHY MUNREVAR1 (EUGENIUS)) was born Abt. 1690 in Waterford County, Ireland, and died 1758 in Augusta County, Virginia. He married NANCY WOOD 1717 in Cumberland, Pa.. She was born Abt. 1694 in Virginia, and died Bet. 1758 - 1760 in Virginia.

Children of JOHN GREGG and NANCY WOOD are:
i. MARGARET45 GREGG.
ii. THOMAS GREGG, b. 1728, Augusta County, Virginia; d. 1773, Harrisonburgh, Va.; m. ELIZABETH SAMPLE.
iii. JOHN GREGG, b. Abt. 1725; d. 1784.
iv. ROBERT GREGG, b. Abt. 1732; m. LYDIA HARRISON. 
Gregg, John (I366573)
 
41

George Gallup
George Gallup founded the Gallup Poll at Princeton, New Jersey, which became the world's first system to objectively and scientifically measure public and customer opinion. He was also the inventor of market research and the ultimate saviour of the customer.
The very existence of the Gallup Poll has changed forever the future of the human race. The Gallup Poll makes it increasingly difficult for individuals to claim "I-am-right", to claim they alone "know what's best" for the public now that accurate scientific measurement of the public/customer viewpoint is possible.
As inventor of market research and the Gallup Poll, Professor George Gallup has so empowered the public viewpoint that his invention may be the greatest act of democracy ever performed by any scientist.
His research covered the fields of: Health; Religion; Politics; Journalism; Advertising; Entertainment; Business; Education and Human Thinking. It can be said that no other person in history has ever had the opportunity to notice and record the views of so many humans on so many aspects of their existence, and in so many parts of their world!
A lesser known side of Dr. Gallup was his interest in humans and the factors which influence their opinions, attitudes, thinking and aspirations. He told me "teaching people to think for themselves was the most important thing in the world to do."
Born in Jefferson, Iowa, in 1900, he attended the University of Iowa and spent ten years as a teacher there and at Drake, Northwestern, and Columbia universities. He had a strong interest in education and what could be done to improve it. He had more than ten honorary Doctorate Degrees from colleges and universities around the world. George died at his Switzerland home in 1984.
As my mentor, Professor Gallup helped with the design of cognetics by impressing upon me the need to measure or notice the CVS (the Current View of the Situation) as a basis for moving to the BVS (the Better View of the Situation).
Dr. Gallup's work stands as one of the first great examples of the practical application of the new field of cognitive science. Among the founders of cognitive science, the work of Gallup, along with that of de Bono and others, may be condsidered fundamental as we evolve into the future with computers.

(Take from the Web page: http://www.sot.com.au/gallup.htm) 
Gallup, George Horace (I306283)
 
42

I have come across a fascinating story about Jacob, and wonder if anyone else can coroborate (or refute) the story. According to the story, sometime after 1790, Jabob moved his family from New London County, Connecticut to Pennsylvania (possibly near Wilkesbarre?), and he invested his wife's money in a flat-boat. Jacob and a partner floated down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans to bring back molassas, sugar, rum, etc. However, somewhere on the return trip, they were attacked by Indians or river pirates, and Jacob was killed. His partner returned and told Jacob's widow, Rebecca, of the attack and the death of Jacob. - Lee James 
Gallup, Jacob (I304239)
 
43

Sir Henry Goodricke In 1668 he married Mary, daughter of Colonel Sir William Legge, "the faithful servant of Charles I.," and sister to George Legge, who was elevated to the Peerage, 2nd December 1682, as Baron Dartmouth .
Lady Goodricke also shared the excitement and dangers with Sir Henry
The following note by Sir John Reresby is interesting: -
" 1681. Nov. 5th I told the King the story of Sir Henry Goodricke, then ambassador in Spain, whom I called brother, of whom I had received a late account, that going out to shoot some miles from Madrid, on his return home he lighted upon some thieves that had set upon a coach full of ladies, with an intent to rob them; but before they could effect it, Sir Henry and his followers attacked them, wounded some and dispersed the rest, and rescued the ladies."

"1683. Feb. 10th. Paris.
A courier who arrived upon Wednesday night last from Madrid brings a confirmation of the report which hath run here for some time, that they are resolved in Spain to forbid the use of the English manufactures, and the letters from thence also say that Sir Henry Goodricke is departed in some haste and that he hath left my lady to follow him some days after."


Letter from Lord Preston to his Aunt Mrs. Graham.
"1683. March 6th. Paris.
I received letters yesterday from Madrid. Which tell me that the 28th of January last my Lady Goodricke left Madrid and joined Sir Henry upon the road some ten leagues from thence, and continued their journey together homewards. I expect them here in a few days, having yesterday received a packet of letters for Sir Henry. From Spain."

Letter from Lord Preston to Sir H. Goodricke.
"1683. March 24th. Paris.
I hope this will find you and my lady safely arrived at London; the notice of which would be very acceptable to me. I had the misfortune to be detained by some business a little too long that morning which you left Paris, so that I got to your lodging just a quarter of an hour after you had left it. Which was a very great trouble to me that I was deprived of the happiness of seeing yourself and my lady before you left this place."

In the chapel on the south wall is a tablet bearing the following inscription

THIS ANCIENT FREE CHURCH OF St ANDREW WAS
REPAIRED AND EMBELLISHED BY Sir HENRY GOODRICKE
IN THE TWELFTH YEAR OF KING WILLIAM OUR DELIVERER
FROM POPERY AND SLAVERY WHO WITH MARY HIS
BELOVED WIFE DESIGN TO BE INTERRED IN GOD'S
APOINTED TIME IN THE NEW VAULT AT THE WEST END
OF 'THIS CHURCH. SHE WAS DAUGHTER TO COLL:
LEGGE AND SISTER TO GEORGE La DARTMOUTH
AND HAS LIVED WITH HER HUSBAND
IN GREAT UNION NEARE 36 YEARES
1703.
This slab was formerly on the front of the Communion-table. 
Legge, Mary (I268975)
 
44
S E A L E F A M I L Y

When I started doing my research, I never dreamed I would find such a treasure trove of information, nor find cousins who were willing to share their information with me. That is why I am writing this book. To pass what little we have been able to preserve and find about our ancestors and pass on to the future generations.

I am so thankful to a man named, Alton Greene, from Sanger, TX. He spent years traveling, visiting relatives, writing, and preserving genealogy history none of us may ever have known or found out. Because of him, I have been able to discover who my Trent, Seale, and Brewer ancestors were. The Greene family is richly entwined with all of our families, including the Amyx family. In genealogy, one learns to accept the so-called (colorful) stories along with those you might consider appealing or important. You find out things you may not necessarily want to know. But all of this is just life. Now I would like to continue with our Seale family history.

Our first proven Seal ancestor, was William Seale. The first records on him are found in Halifax County, VA. in 1753. William was probably born in 1730, probably in the American Colonies, and probably VA.

William always spelled his name with an (e), which points to his English ancestry. Proper names in England such as Seal were always spelled with this final e. Seal was a place, a dwelling, an area, but as a proper name the English spelled it SEALE. Seals, Seale, Seal - England, means Dweller in, or near, a hall, one who came from Seal (hall or small wood), the name of places in Kent and Derbyshire, or from Seale (hall) in Surry.

William Seale was born a subject of King George II, who was more interested in his German land and titles than he was in England or his American colonies. During his rule the war between England and France began. It moved to America and became "The French and Indian War." The French in Canada enlisted the American Indians to help fight the English and the Colonies, thus we find our William Seale, subject of King George II, caught up in this war and it brings us to Halifax Co. VA. in 1753.

William Seale, during his life, was a farmer, a deputy sheriff and a school teacher. These occupations have been followed by countless descendants of his.
William Seale:
Born about 1730, place unknown. Died after 1815 in Pittsylvania Co. or Halifax Co. VA. Married Nancy Anna__________?

Following is a partial list of records which can be found on William Seale:
Land and Property records. Pittsylvania Co. VA.
William Seale bought 400 acres of land in Halifax County, VA in 1756 at head of
Rocky River running toward the Lich of Wolfe Hill.

Colonial Soldiers of Halifax Co. VA. 1758. French and Indian War.
Colonel Abraham Maury:Captains, Lieutenants, and Privates listed.
William Seale was a private.

Halifax county, VA, book 3, Page 257, 1766, July Court.
Ordered that the Church Warden of Antrim Parish in this County do bind out
Zackary, Peter, James, and Solomon Seale, poor children of William Seale
according to law. It appearing to the court that said father is not able to maintain
and instruct them in Christian principals.

(The all powerful and strong Church of England at that time could do things like
that in the early colonies).

Pittsylvania County, VA. Defendants Index to Court Orders, August 1799.
Book 9, Page 137. William Seale appointed Constable of this county.

Following is a lively interesting story about our forebear, William Seale:

Halifax County, VA. 1753
Plaintiff - Murphy
Defendant - Seale
Joseph Murphy an infant under the age of twenty one years by Elenor Smith
his mother and next friend--against William Seale. For reasons appearing to this
court ordered that this suit be dismissed.

From other records it would seem that Elenor Smith had first married ____Murphy, that said Murphy left his son, Joseph also some money. Elenor married second time to Gideon Smith who had also been married before and he had left her and his Smith children some money which seemly said Elenor was spending freely. It appears that William Seale had borrowed or took as a gift, money from Elenor that belonged to her son Joseph Murphy and was helping her spend Smith money. 
Seale, William (I366778)
 
45
"We are the children 0f many sires, and every drop of blood in us in its turn betrays its ancestor."

Ralph Waldo Emmerson

Daniel Rice was the fourth son of Henry Rice, the Tennessee Grist miller. He was born in SC ca 1765 - 1770. He died before 1822 in Claiborne Co. TN. He Md. Susannah Senter Dec. 18, 1797 in Hawkins Co. TN. He owned and operated the gristmill that his father, Henry Rice built at Kingsport, TN on the Holston River known as Rice's Mill. He lived not far from Cumberland Gap and was also a gunsmith. I do not believe he had a will but there was a lawsuit amongst his children concerning land of his wife after his death. Daniel and Susannah had 8 children.

Grantor, Rice, Daniel to Grantee, William Hord, date: 28, Feb. 1814. Hawkins County, $500.00 for 10 acres, "Island on Holston River opposite to the mouth of Rice's Mill Creek, known by the name of Rices Island--------." (Daniel owned his father's Rice Mill.)

In the presence of:
Hugh Graham Danl. Rice (Seal)
William Young

Campbell County, deed:
Grantor Grantee Instrument Date Book Page Amount
Hord, Wm. Rice, Daniel Deed 1813 D 183 $1400
Rice, Danl. Robinson, Absalom " 1820 F 123 350
Hord, Wm. Rice, Daniel " 1819 G 4 1
Hord, Wm. Rice, Daniel Bond 1827 H 348 ----

Claiborne Co. TN Index to Deeds:
Daniel Rice John Baker Deed 1818 F 5 100
Daniel Rice Absalom Deed 1820 F 123 350

Daniel Rice, the gunsmith, had a land grant from the state of Tennessee:
Tennessee State Grant No. 5999, Book 12, 15 acres, date November 2, 1818, Greene
County Co. location East Tennessee District. Book 5, page 374.

Hawkins Co. Tax List, 1809-1812: McWilliams Company, 1809---Daniel Rice---640
acres---1 white poll---1 black poll.

Hawkins Co. Deed Book #12
Grantor, Rice, Daniel to Grantee, Wm. Hord, date 27 Feb. 1813
Hawkins Co, $5,000, Claiborne Co. 643 acres

North side of Holston River, Robert Young's line, Beard's Creek, Wm. Engle's line. Grant from The State of North Carolina #347, dated 10th November 1784.

In presence of John Young
George Wright Danl. Rice (Seal)
Wm. Weaver
August Session 1813, Registered 9 Sept. 1813

Martin Rice in his remembrance wrote about Daiel:

"Daniel Rice, I believe the fourth son, lived and died in Claiborne Co. TN. not far from the Cumberland Gap. His sons were Henry, Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and his daughters were Temperance (our line), and Patience. Some of these I have seen and remember, but have no knowledge of them or their descendants for 50 years past. Daniel was a gunsmith, and his son Henry, was a militia Colonel in 1832 or about that time."

I do not believe Daniel Rice had a will, but there are records of a lawsuit amongst his children and on page 161 of Wilson County, TN Wills, Book I-13, 1802-1850, we find a "Susannah Rice Settlement, 19 Jan. 1848, p. 206." The lawsuit will be picked up and discussed in the chapter on our great-great grandmother, Temperance (Rice) Rice Campbell.

The following document was found in:
Claiborne County, TN Roll 19, Book E. pp. 34-35, 12 February 1816
McClung Historical Collection, Knoxville, TN

Daniel Rice to Isham Wheles:
This Indenture made this 12th Day of February in the year of our Lord 1816 between Daniel Rice of the one part Isham Wheles of the other part, both of the County of Claiborne and State of Tennessee Witnessed that the said Daniel Rice for and in consideration of the sum of five hundred and Sixty eight dollars to Him in hand paid the Receipt whereof and payment is here by acknowledged hath granted bargained and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain Sell and convey unto the said Isaam Wheelus his heirs and assigns a certain peace or parcel of Land containing one hundred Eighty four acres be the same more or less situate lying and being on Mulberry Creek in Claiborne County bounded as follows Viz. Beginning at a Buckeye and Beach thence North twenty Six Degrees west fifty poles to a Beach sugar tree and dogwood on the East side of a branch thence south Sixty five Degrees West one hundred and thirty four poles to a dogwood and chestnut thence south fifteen degrees East two hundred and twenty poles to a Buckeye Beach and Hack berry thence North Sixty five Degrees East one hundred forty two poles to a stake thence North fifteen Degrees west one hundred and Seventy one poles to the begining it being part of the tract of land where on the said Daniel Rice now lives and now in the possession of the said Isham Wheles together with Every of the appurtenances there unto belonging or in any wise appertaining also all the Estate Right title interest and ? of in and to the same to have and to hold the above land and promises therewith the appurtenances unto the said Isham Wheles his heirs and assigns for Ever and the said Daniel Rice and his heirs the fee Simple Right and title of the aforesaid tract of Land and every part and parcel there of unto the said Isham Wheles his heirs and assigns and all other persons what so ever and does by these presents Warrant and will for ever depend in Witness whereof the said Daniel Rice hath hereunto set his hand and Seal the day and date above written signed, sealed and delivered in presents of us.

Daniel Rice (Seal)

John Ramsey
David Chadwell 
Rice, Daniel Hezekiah (I366452)
 
46
After the close of the Revolutionary War, Silas with his brothers Levi, Samuel, Ezra, and their cousin John Gallup and several other families from the towns of Groton and Stonington, Connecticut moved to Albany County, NY and established the towns of Knox and Berne, NY. 
Gallup, Silas (I303959)
 
47
Benadam Gallup was a distinguished soldier who served in the French and Indian Wars and many other colonial expeditions. He acquired the title of Col. in the old French Wars in Feb. 1757. The Connecticut Assembly raised 1400 men and established them as the 12th Co. made up of men mostly from Groton and Preston under the command of Col. Benadam Gallup. In June 1776, he and his company of men went to reinforce Washington in New York.
Military - French and Indian Wars, Revolutionary War - 
Gallup, Col. Benadam III (I304223)
 
48
He was connected with the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railrood for 40 years - the town of Gallup, New Mexico is named for him. 
Gallup, David Leeds (I304116)
 
49
He was stationed at Ft. Griswold in 1779, served in Lieut. Col. Sullivan's Expidition to RI in 1778. He was appointed Col. and commander of the 27th "reg of foot" by Gov. Jonathan Trumball in 1780.
Military - - Revolutionary War Soldier 
Gallup, Col. Nathan (I304214)
 
50
In 1753, he became and original member of the Susquehanna Co. of Connecticut and a shareholder in first organization. He and his elder son, Hallet, participated in the battle of Wyoming, July 3, 1778, at which time his family found refuge in Forty Fort. Following the surrender of the fort, the family returned to Connecticut.
Military - - Battle of Wyoming, French and Indian Wars 
Gallup, Capt. William (I304212)
 

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